Free Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Essays and Papers

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Free Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Essays and Papers

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    Paramount Pictures (originally named Famous players), Mutual Film Corporation, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, and Fox Film Corporation. Warner Bros. Pictures, incorporated in 1923 by the brothers (Jack, Harry, Albert, and Sam); the studio's first principal asset was Rin Tin Tin. MGM, first named Metro-Goldwyn Pictures - in 1924 formed from the merger of Metro Pictures (1915), Samuel Goldwyn Picture Corporation (1917), and the Louis B. Mayer Pictures Company (1918).

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    Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's Beginnings

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    Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in the 1920’s The roaring twenties would be nothing without the roar of the MGM Lion. “If Hollywood had no other studio than Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the town still would have been the movie capital of the world” (Fricke para 1). MGM enchanted audiences with its high-budgeted films and glamorous list of stars (Hanson para 1). Three failing movie companies came together in 1924 in hopes to make it big in the motion picture industry, and it did (Fricke para 3). Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer created

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    Sam Goldwyn

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    Man. [1] The Goldwyn Productions was started in 1916 when Goldfish paired up with Broadway's Edgar and Alan Selwyn. Liking the elegant sound of the Goldwyn name, he adopted it as his own, and so Schmuel “Goldfish” became Samuel Goldwyn. In 1924, theater owner, Marcus Loew procured a business package including Metro Pictures, The Goldwyn Company, and Louis B. Mayer Productions. Adopting Goldwyn's lion logo, inspired by the statue outside the New York Public Library, the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM)

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    Sony Merger

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    Sony Merger A great deal of companies and corporations, whether diminutive or immense, merge to become one company. Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) refers to the aspect of corporate strategy, corporate finance and management dealing with the buying, selling and combining of different companies that can aid, finance, or help a growing company in a given industry grow rapidly without having to create another business entity. For instance, the Merger between Sony and MGM in 2005, Sony even took the

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    Singin' in the Rain

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    Singin' in the Rain Produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer for budget of $2.54 million, released April 10, 1952 by MGM and grossed $3.6 million, Technicolor 35mm negative, 1.37:1 screen aspect ratio, mono sound, 103 mins.; Laserdisc released 1991; restored theatrical print from original 3-strip Technicolor negatives released 1992; DVD released 1997 with remastered Dolby digital sound Production: Directed by Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly Written by Betty Comden, Adolph Green Produced by Arthur Freed

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    The Cameraman (Rough Draft) The Cameraman (1928), an MGM Buster Keaton feature, is one of the last truly great feature films of the silent era. From the artistic balance it finds between the simplicity of an all-too-familiar storyline and the complexity of technique and cinematography, to the very-entertaining and captivating performances of its actors, the film that was nearly lost to the annals of motion-picture history is a multi-faceted gem that is joyous to watch. Simplicity is one of the big

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    The Way American Culture Has Changed Over Time

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    It is obvious American culture has changed drastically over time. American culture today is a lot different than it was one hundred, fifty , even twenty years ago. Styles, music, entertainment, and technology have all altered significantly. There are many people that influence our culture with their new talents, ideas, and personalities. During the 1930’s, your go-to girl for a good movie would be Judy Garland. With her diverse talents and unique beauty, she was always a sight to see on screen,she

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    The 30s

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    Elmer Sheeley). Set Decorator (Edwin B Willis), and Costume Design (Adrian). The most important part of the crew would have to be the director, assistant director and production management. Such as ( Ulric Busch, Charles Chic, Joe Cook, Louis B Mayer, Keith Weeks, Al Shenberg, Wallaee Wasle Jr.) ( crew.imdb.com) The Technology was a big important part of the movie as well. It was because of the technology that the tornado was even possible. The first tornado was a thirty-five foot tall rubber

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    The Wizard of Oz is the 1939 film musical released by the studio Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer that became a cultural icon defining family entertainment for decades after its initial release. Though it did not turn a profit until 1956 when it aired on television, it has been considered a wide success, spawning several re-releases and sequels. The Wizard of Oz set the precedent for visual effects, innovations Hollywood still utilizes today in an age of computer generated images. The film has stood the test

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald in Hollywood

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    begun his painful relationship with Hollywood, which for the remainder of his life would simultaneously represent endless promise and unceasing frustration. The second time Fitzgerald went to Hollywood was in 1931, under the invitation of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer who wanted Scott to do an adaptation of Red-Headed Woman, a book by Katherine Brush.

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