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    Methodist Church

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    The United Methodist Church My home church is United Methodist. I have gone there ever since I was a child because that is where my mother went to church. Through researching this paper I found many interesting things about my church. There are many points and issues I agree with and many I disagree with. Writing this really made me think about my denomination closely and if it’s the right one for me. The United Methodist Church shares a common history and heritage with other Methodist and Wesleyan

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    The Methodist Movement in America

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    middle of the 19th century, Methodism enjoyed a meteoric rise. At the time of the American Revolution Methodists comprised a very small percentage of the American religious population, and yet by the mid 1800s Methodism was a dominant religious movement. In fact, historian William Warren Sweet claims that while “of all the religious bodies in America at the close of the American Revolution, the Methodists were the most insignificant,” it can now safely be said that “Methodism was to the West what Puritanism

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    like the Methodist. Methodism was an evangelical regeneration movement within the Church of England in the early eighteenth century that extended to the American colonies in the 1760s. In both Britain and America, the original members came mostly from the poorest and most marginal social classes. By 1830 the Methodist Episcopal Church had become the largest religious denomination in the United States despite Methodism split into various denominational forms over the years, the Methodist Episcopal

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    History of the Methodist Church

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    By 1913 the major Methodist church in the East End was Milby Memorial, formerly Harrisburg, which had entered into the appointment system by 1873. Park Place Methodist Episcopal Church, South in 1917, soon followed the Milby church. This particular church, Park Place, history was emblematic of the church growth in the Houston area. In the East end just south of the city of Houston a suburban community called Park Place had developed. This particular community was not significantly different than

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    United Methodist Church

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    How do we stay Wesleyan if we don't heed the Notes and Sermons of John Wesley in some way You need to not preach your personal theology but preach the theology of the church United Methodists are not supposed to contradict the church's doctrinal standards, but can "go beyond and expand Wesley believed that the doctrine of the Trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit was a "fundamental belief" of Christian faith Believing in the "complete divinity" of Christ was also "essential" to Christianity Wesley

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    Methodist Mission Work

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    wellbeing of others. The Methodist Mission work is the act of helping people around the world by giving them knowledge of Christ. The Methodist Church greatly supports the work of missionaries, they believe that we are disciples doing the work of God. The Church supports Missionaries in many ways such as prayer, donations, or even supports a missionary or a group financially. MIssionaries help overseas or even in their own community by spreading the knowledge of Christ. Methodist Missionaries (notice

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    The Methodist Church The Lee family arrived in the United States approximately around 1748 or 1750. The Lee family would play significant role in the transformation of this country as time went on. During the Second Great Awaking there were many social issues that developed during this era. One of the social issues that resulted from the Second Great Awakening was arrival of the Methodist Church to the United States in 1768 and the rapid growth of the Methodist church. This became a problem for

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    The African Methodist Episcopal Church also known as the AME Church, represents a long history of people going from struggles to success, from embarrassment to pride, from slaves to free. It is my intention to prove that the name African Methodist Episcopal represents equality and freedom to worship God, no matter what color skin a person was blessed to be born with. The thesis is this: While both Whites and Africans believed in the worship of God, whites believed in the oppression of the Africans’

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    Methodist Churches around the World

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    the United Methodist, African Methodist Episcopal Church, and Judaism all have ideals in common but throughout their histories have changed and turned into their own separate churches or synagogues with their own ways of worship. That is why I wonder what causes members of these religions to join these ways of worship. The Methodist Church was created in 1787 by John Wesley in England. The Methodist denomination is a branch of the Protestant religions. When creating the Methodist Church John

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    full understanding of the United Methodist Church’s practices and doctrines, it is important to compare and contrast the modern tradition of the Methodist Church to Wesley’s original tradition; by considering Wesleyan-influenced worship specifically relating to Methodist preaching, the Methodist sacraments, order of worship, significance and meaning of various baptism ceremonies, open communion, and the nature of the early Methodist worship service. The Methodist tradition and it’s future has been

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