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    of claiming the social impact like the Methodist. Methodism was an evangelical regeneration movement within the Church of England in the early eighteenth century that extended to the American colonies in the 1760s. In both Britain and America, the original members came mostly from the poorest and most marginal social classes. By 1830 the Methodist Episcopal Church had become the largest religious denomination in the United States despite Methodism split into various denominational forms over the years

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    Methodism and Deism

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    Vol. 33, No. 4 (1972): 561-576. Steensland, Brian, et al. "The measure of American religion: Toward improving the state of the art." Social Forces 79.1 (2000): 291-318. Turner, John Munsey. John Wesley: the evangelical revival and the rise of Methodism in England. Epworth Press, 2002. Wesley, John. The character of a Methodist. S. Powell, 1747. Wesley, John. An earnest appeal to men of reason and religion. W. Pine, 1771.

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    Eliot and Methodism in Adam Bede

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    Eliot and Methodism in Adam Bede Adam Bede was George Eliot's-pseudonym of Mary Ann Evans-second book and first novel. Eliot was raised in a strict Methodist family. Her friendships with two skeptical philosophers, Charles Bray and Charles Hennell, brought her to challenge and eventually reject her rigid religious upbringing  ("George Eliot" 91). Adam Bede was based on a story told to Eliot by one of her Methodist aunts, a tragicomedy, and the moral of the novel is that man cannot escape the

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    I have been a firm believer that if one does not understand where you come from you can have little understanding of where your heading. The first thirty-two pages of the book on “Methodism and the Christian Heritage in England” gave a background as to Wesley’s foundation that so many authors overlook. The first page summed it up best in: “The long course of English ecclesiastical history met the force of a new concern for renewal, both individual and institutional. A long tradition of propositional

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    Taking Heaven by John H. Storm Wiggers

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    In his book Taking Heaven by Storm, John H. Wiggers argues that Methodism has played a vital role in shaping current day American society by developing an innovative method of blending Methodist pious ideals with American values (191). A History Professor at University of Missouri, Wiggers adequately supports his thesis with three main arguments of Methodist innovation in America and their effects evangelism, community, and equality. Wiggers argues these points through a combination of personal

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    The American Revolution

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    The American Revolution was a pivotal time for American Methodism. Had Asbury not stayed in the country, Methodism might have failed in America. Though he was confined to Delaware and parts of Maryland, and persecuted by those who opposed Methodists, Asbury still elevated his influence. Through unifying Methodists all over the American colonies and leading itinerant preachers during the conflict of war, Asbury successfully expanded Methodism. At the end of the American Revolution, there were 14,988

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    Methodist Church

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    Atlantic voyage to the New World. Organized Methodism in America began as a lay movement. Among its earliest leaders were Robert Strawbridge, an immigrant farmer who organized work about 1760 in Maryland and Virginia, Philip Embury and his cousin, Barbara Heck, who began work in New York in 1766, and Captain Thomas Webb, whose labors were instrumental in Methodist beginnings in Philadelphia in 1767. The American Revolution had a profound impact on Methodism. John Wesley’s Toryism and his writings against

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    two things should be undertaken. Methodism is based on three pillars, including: devotion in studies, prayer, and helping the underprivileged. Methodism was first considered a movement that centered on old Christian tradition. Therefore, modern Methodism is still comprised of Anglican beliefs. Although the Methodist Church has changed in its doctrine and practice, the future of the Methodist Church should never forget Wesley’s theology. Sweet state’s, “Methodism arose out of two great urges: the

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    History of the Methodist Church

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    congregation. In 1941 the sanctuary opened with five hundred people in attendance. It was at this time that the beloved... ... middle of paper ... ...nnual Session. Beaumont: Plummer-American Printing Company, 1948. Thrall, Homer S. History of Methodism in Texas. Houston: E. H. Cushing, 1872. unknown. HISTORY OF THE GERTRUDE WATSON CLASS. Edited by Stored in Park Place History Box Servants of Christ UMC Attic. Houston, Texas: PARK PLACE M. E. CHURCH SCHOOL, 1944. —. This is Your Church 1946-47

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    balls

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    Methodism has been the dominant religion that has been important to my family and ancestors for many generations. My ancestors on both sides of my family came to America from Germany in the 1800’s (Elphic, 11/9/13). They made their way to Iowa with the hope of becoming farmers (Elphic, 11/9/13). Religion did not play a factor on where they settled (Elphic, 11/9/13). They were one of the first people to help establish and settle in a town called Benjamin in Franklin County, Iowa, in 1852 (Elphic,

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