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    Metaphysical Poets Essay

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    Metaphysical poets, was a group of English poets of seventeenth century (late Elizabethan era) who never formed a separate school or a movement proper in the history of English Literature, but were rather distinguished and categorized on the basis of the presence of common traits of style, wit, inventiveness, wordplay and most importantly; the use of metaphors in an untraditional way. The term was first coined by Samuel Johnson who in his book ‘Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets’ (1779-81) referred

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    John Donne. Mainly a poet, I will be focusing on his earlier lust poem “Elegy XIX: To His Mistress Going to Bed”, the love poem “The Sun Rising”, and religious poem “Hymn to God My God, in my Sickness”. Before diving into such works, it is important to first learn about Donne and his life. John

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    John Donne: A True Metaphysical Poet

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    unanimously acknowledged as a true metaphysical poet because he made an unlike conceptual thought against the Elizabethan poetry, showed an analytical pattern of love and affection and displayed an essence of dissonance in words and expressions. This paper concentrates on the exploration of the characteristics of Donne’s metaphysical poetry highlighting extended form of epigrams, conceits, paradoxes and ratiocinations. Donne in respect of the manifestation of metaphysical beauty was an unparallel and super

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    John Donne and George Herbert: the Metaphysical Brothers of Poetry Although not an official or formal school of poetry Metaphysical Poetry is widely present in 17th century English poetry. According to the Norton Anthology of English Literature, English poets such as Herbert, Vaughan, Crashaw, Marvell, Traherne, and Cowley can all be attributed as Metaphysical poets (1262). Coined by critics such as Samuel Johnson and William Hazlitt, Metaphysical poetry contains complex conceits and self-conscious

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    formations, the most complex classifications and studies of reason if the poet is able to carry sensation into these poems, forming them into passionate experiences through vivid and moving imagery. For uncertain or inexperienced readers not prepared for understatement and subtleties, Donne’s poetry acts as a vivid recruiting device. Such readers need to be grabbed by the shoulders and shaken by the strenuousness of Donne’s metaphysical conceits in order to truly delight in the style and theme of a poem

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    John Donne is known as being one of the most famous and influential metaphysical poets. The term “metaphysical," as applied to English and continental European poets of the seventeenth century, was used by Augustan poets John Dryden and Samuel Johnson to reprove those poets for their “unnaturalness.” As Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote, however, “The unnatural, that too is natural," and the metaphysical poets continue to be studied and revered for their intricacy and originality. Due to Donne’s

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    to one psychologist or another.  However, if one asked a certain young minister from seventeenth century London the same questions, he would have suddenly become inspired.  This exceptional personality was the metaphysical poet John Donne. Many people debate whether Donne's metaphysical style of verse is genuinely contemplative comparison or merely eccentric imagery.  However, if one looks deep enough into the witty his witty works such as, "The Sun Rising," or "The Flea," they will find evidence

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    the inner most workings of the human soul. Works Cited Cording, "George Herbert." Padgett, Ron, ed. World Poets. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2000. 438. Print. Eliot, Thomas S. British Writers. Ed. Ian Scott-Kilvert. Vol. 2. New York: Scribner, 1979. 119. Print. Gottlieb, Sydney "George Herbert." Reisman, Rosemary M. Canfield., ed. British, Irish, and Commonwealth Poets. 4th ed. Vol. 2. Pasadena, CA: Salem, 2011. 618. Print. Herbert, George. “Easter Wings.” Greenblatt, Stephen

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    Exploration of the Different Aspects of Love in Poetry In the Victorian and Elizabethan times there were many poems, which explored the aspect of love. The metaphysical group of poets explored the whole experience of man, which was usually romantic or sensual. The poems I will talk about are "The Flea" by John Donne (1572-1631), "To His Coy Mistress" by Andrew Marvell (1621-78), "The Sick Rose" by William Blake (1757-1827), "A Woman To Her Lover" by Christina Walsh in the Victorian era and

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    create an effective poem in emphasising his meaning and thoughts. The Major conceit in 'A Valediction Forbidding Mourning ' is that of a compass. Samuel Johnson a fellow poet, who coined the term metaphysical poetry criticised Donne by stating that 'the poem 's compass analogy highlights the violence used by metaphysical poets to force the most heterogeneous ideas together. Disagreeing with this statement, Donne 's use of the compass to reinforce the idea that their souls are like the legs of the

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    Herbert's Metaphysical Poems

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    Herbert's Metaphysical Poems In the first portion of The Temple, specifically Perirrhanterium, Herbert prescribes the didactics necessary for the instruction of the catechumen in a simple, straightforward manner. As the reader moves into the main section of The Church, the author’s poetic wit becomes more complex in both its style and depth of topic. Although the starkness of the messages in Herbert’s metaphysical poems is not as palpable as those of the Church Porch, their ability to teach

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    Metaphysical wit and conceit are two of the most famous literary devices used in the seventeenth century by poets such as John Donne. Emerging out of the Petrarchan era, metaphysical poetry brought a whole new way of expression and imagery dealing with emotional, physical and spiritual issues of that time. In this essay I will critically analyse the poem, The Flea written by John Donne in which he makes light of his sexual intentions with his lover. In the first stanza of the poem, Donne tries

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    Metaphysical Conceit

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    Metaphysical Conceit Metaphysical Conceita highly ingenious kind of conceit widely used by the metaphysical poets, who explored all areas of knowledge to find, in the startlingly esoteric or the shockingly commonplace, telling and unusual analogies for their ideas. Metaphysical conceits often exploit verbal logic to the point of the grotesque and sometimes achieve such extravagant turns on meaning that they become absurd (e.g. Richard Crashaw's description of Mary Magdalene's eyes as "Two

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    the most famous Metaphysical Poet. Other members of this group were ‘George Herbert’, ‘Thomas Traherne’, ‘Henry Vaughan’, ‘Andrew Marvell’, and ‘Richard. John Milton in his ‘Comus’ also fell into this group. As compared to Metaphysical Poets ‘The Cavalier poets’ that include ‘Ben Jonson’, ‘Richard Lovelace’, ‘Robert Herrick’, ‘Edmund Waller’, ‘Thomas Carew’ and ‘John Denham’, wrote in a lighter, elegant and artificial style. At the end of the 18th Century, the Metaphysical Poets, went out of favor

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    The Metaphysical Conceit

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    “Dull sublunary lovers' love —Whose soul is sense—cannot admit Of absence, 'cause it doth remove The thing which elemented it” (Donne). It is the very nature of the metaphysical conceit: to remove itself from the world of the tangible yet project an image far more moving than its literal counterpart. It is to go above and beyond the world of the immediate, to transcend the physical and stay bound to its origin, its comparison, while floating in the dreamy ether. The quote featured above serves as

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    While metaphysical poetry consists of a specific style with expected patterns, different poets emphasize different aspects of as much, choosing to highlight the importance of the conceit, the intermingling of the spiritual and the physical, the need for meditation, and so on. For example, John Donne tends to worry himself with metaphysical conceits to the ends of the universe and back, overdeveloping extended metaphors to the point where the specific object that another is being compared to is referred

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    Sir Philip Sidney, defended poetry in just such terms; the poet, Sidney writes in The Defence of Poetry (NAEL 1.933-54), is not constrained by nature or history but freely ranges "only within the zodiac of his own wit." But Sidney knew well, and from painful personal experience, how much this vision of golden autonomy was contracted by the pressures, perils and longings of the brazen world. And only a few pages after he imagines the poet orbiting entirely within the constellations of his own intellect

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    of his youth, the love of his married middle age, and the piety of the latter part of his life. His poem,’ The Flea’ represents the restless feeling of lust during his youthful days but it comes together with a true respect for women through the metaphysical conceit of the flea as a church in the rhythm of the sexual act. The speaker in "The Flea" is a restless, would-be lover who is trying to convince his beloved to give her virginity to him. Therefore, to convince his lover, the speaker employs

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    to be one of the greatest metaphysical poets of our time, even though he published only a small number of poems in his lifetime. The poems he did write were metaphorical and often humorus poems telling the tale of religious love and sex. Being a metaphysical poet he exhibited many characteristics of the metaphysical poets. He wrote with metaphysical wit, metaphysical conceit, metaphors, symbols and paradoxes. If these were some of the things that defined a metaphysical poet, then John Donne is a good

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    John Donne, a seventeenth century poet, created works during a period with a lack of literary mold - a lack of traditional literary structure. Because Donne lived in an era where there was a lacking of a traditional literary structure, he did not have to define himself as individual from the perceived normal. Donne and other metaphysical poets branded this time as a period of metaphysical definition: an attempt to articulate a more precise analysis of metaphysical concepts by using writing characteristics

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