Free Metabotropic glutamate receptor Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Metabotropic glutamate receptor Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 2 - About 18 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Admissions Essay - From Farming to Medicine I heard the familiar sound of the back door closing gently. My father was returning from driving his dirty, green John Deere tractor in one of our fields. Although he begins his day at 5:00 a.m. every morning, he usually returns at around 7:00 p.m. I never really questioned his schedule when I was a child, but as I entered high school I wondered how my dad could work so hard every day of the week and still enjoy what he does. He works long hours, becomes

    • 757 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Thousands of food additives are widely used in food processing and people consume daily a considerable amount of these additives. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of glutamic acid, an abundant naturally occurring amino acid (Walker et al., 2000). It can produce a unique taste, known as a fifth taste (umami) that cannot be provided by other basic taste. MSG has also the ability to enhance diet intake in older (Bellisle, 1998; Yamaguchi, 1998; Yamaguchi and Ninomiya, 2000). This popular

    • 595 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 72 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Glial Cell Case Study

    • 688 Words
    • 2 Pages

    release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic neuron. After its release from the presynaptic cell, the neurotransmitter diffuses across the synaptic cleft to the postsynaptic membrane, where it attaches to the receptor. 6. What are the differences between ionotropic and metabotropic

    • 688 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Introduction: There is immense study on the role of glutamate in Schizophrenia. Even so to date the current antipsychotics do not control major glutamatergic action albeit a study at the NMDA receptor location such as the glycine transport inhibitors may give new novel evidence for the discovery of future antipsychotics (Olney et al., 1999) The Dopamine hypothesis of Schizophrenia The dopamine (DA) theory of schizophrenia has subjugated the effort to justify the behaviours Schizophrenia is a psychiatric

    • 2341 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 17 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Learning refers to a process by which new information about the world is acquired, while memory describes how knowledge is retained. Memory can be explicit or implicit. In explicit form, there is conscious recall of information about things, people and places, while in implicit type, there is non-conscious recall of tasks such as motor skills(Broadbent et al., 2004). Explicit memory depends on the integrity of structures such as the hippocampus, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. Implicit memory

    • 969 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Lou Gehrig's Disease

    • 1052 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Lou Gehrig's disease is often referred to as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), this is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons come from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the entire body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS would eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is

    • 1052 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Potentiation) is responsible for the development of dendrites and spine (Stephan, Baldeweg, and Friston 2006). Altered function of the gene NRG1 that encodes neuregulin-1 and its receptor ErbB4 are also associated with the disease. High levels of NRG1 is observed in forebrain regions of patients with reduced activity of glutamate and GABA. Lin Mei and Wen-Cheng Xiong were able to observe behavioral deficits when they increased the levels of NRG1 of genetically engineered adult mice and they were also

    • 1306 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    EPILEPSY INTRODUCTION Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent and uncertain intrusions of normal brain function, called epileptic seizure (Fisher et al., 2005). The word epilepsy was derived from the Greek word “attack”. The primitive Greeks thought epilepsy was contagious, and hence people with epilepsy used to live alone (Dam, 2003). It is one of the oldest conditions known to humankind (WHO, 2001a) and still the most common neurological condition affecting individuals of

    • 1216 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    to have a glial-like function (Finger, 2005). Type I cells extend a microvillus into the taste pore where taste molecules can come in contact with the cell. Type I cells express some specific markers proteins like an ecto-ATPase NTPDase 2 and a Glutamate aspartate transporter or GLAST (Bartel et al., 2006; Pumplin et al., 1999). Both of these proteins are involved in terminating neurotransmitter action hence further

    • 1219 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Neurological Aspects: Autism is a complex neuronal developmental disorder with the number of cases has risen rapidly over the past decade. Autistic behavioral characteristics emerges early in childhood, which include abnormal social interaction and repetitive behavior, with symptoms (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). The autism phenotype also includes impaired motor function (Baranek, 2002), mental retardation and seizures (Gillberg and Billstedt, 2000). Apart from these anxiety (Muris et

    • 1272 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
Previous
Page12