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    Mania is derived from 'menos' for life-force and 'mainesthai' - the term used to describe rage and madness. Aretaeus of Cappadocia, an illustrated Greek Physician during the early century, examined and scrutinized the relationship between mania and melancholia in the evolution of bipolar disorder. In his work, 'On Aetiology and Symptomatology of Chronic Illnesses', he indicated that both patterns of mood are a consequence of a similar disorder. This connection, however failed to gain notice until much

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    The poem A Dream Within a Dream written by Edgar Allen Poe has initiated my interest in the issue covered in this task. As someone who has had experience with depression for the past few years, I felt a strong connection to the theme of the poem as the emotions depicted through the experience of the narrator of Poe’s poem were quite relatable to my own experience with depression. This led me to the topic of depression. Although A Dream Within a Dream does not explicitly touch on the topic of depression

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    personality traits and mental illnesses were attributed to a balance or imbalance of body fluids named humors. The four humors were yellow bile, black bile, phlegm, and blood. Hippocrates divides mental illnesses into different components: mania, melancholia(depression), and phrenitis (brain fever). Moving on many years forward, during the renaissance in Italy in the 14th through the 17th century mental illness was apparent. Witch hunts and killings of the mentally ill were popular in Europe. Some

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    such an extent as to be affected by diseases caused by black bile, as is said to have happened to Heracles among the heroes? (Problemata XXX.1 953a10-14) (1) So begins the Aristotelian Problema XXX.1. Why indeed! The atrabilious temperament or melancholia is, according to Aristotle, a natural disposition in which there is a preponderance of black bile over the other humours. The healthy somatic ideal, however, was conceived by Greek medical theorists as the equality of the humours, either with respect

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    astrological tie between the planets in which you are born. Time and time again, we hear all different types of things about the planets and melancholia, however, have we really learned anything about it? In today’s society there is always talk about one thing or another, but when does this talk all stop and it becomes reality? Intellects and melancholia are the connection between planet Saturn and suffering melancholy. How does one view this and are they right or wrong for thinking this way.

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    What is Depression? What is depression? Depression is the feelings of gloominess, sadness, dejection, being alone in the world, hopelessness, worthlessness, etc. Originally this was called Melancholia. First thing I going to talk about is the many causes of depression. First off there is abuse, which can range anywhere from emotional, mental, to physical. If someone is abused in any way it can make them feel worthless or make them feel like the deserve the abuse cause they view themselves as failures

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    “A was a man, take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again” (Shakespeare 182). Hamlet had a strong enough bond with his father that when his father died, hamlet became melancholic. Freud in his essay mourning and melancholia, explains how melancholia is “the reaction to the loss of a loved object” (Strachey

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    The Melancholy Dane

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    reflects Prince Hamlet in his famous “to be, or not to be” melancholic soliloquy. In Shakespeare’s masterpiece, Hamlet’s declamations are filled with melancholia, which was an extremely common mood among the literal and intellectual characters of the Elizabethan’s times. One of them, Robert Burton, wrote its greatest depiction in his popular Anatomy of Melancholia at the beginning of the 1600’s. Burton’s work is believed to had been significant to Shakespeare in the sense that it pinpointed the common stereotype

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    to be herself. In this paper I intend to look into the changing dialectics of hedonism and melancholia that traces the structure of Sally’s mind and experience. Her fragility, desperation, neuroses and her ingenious art to conceal them all, provides a fitting prelude to the reigning socio-cultural structure of Berlin under the Nazi regime. In Mourning and Melancholia (1917), Freud distinguishes ‘melancholia’ from ‘mourning’ and charges it with pathological implications. He states that unlike the physical

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    University of Delaware Press, 1992. Lidz, Theodore.  Hamlet's Enemy: Madness and Myth in Hamlet.  Vision Press, 1975. Lyons, Bridget Gellert. Voices of Melancholy.  New York: Barnes and Noble, 1971. Schiesari, Juliana.  The Gendering of Melancholia: Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and the Symbolics of Loss in Renaissance Literature.    Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1992. Shakespeare, William.  Hamlet.  Ed. George Lyman Kittredge. Boston: Ginn and Company, 1939.

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    The hamlet written by William Shakespeare has been interpreted by different people for years. One of the enigmas that people try to explain in the novel is The hamlet’s delay to avenge his father by killing Claudius. Sigmund Freud explains Hamlet’s delay in avenging his father using the Oedipus complex. Freud says that Hamlet’s reluctance to kill Claudius is due to “the torment he suffers from the obscure memory that he himself had meditated the same deed against his father from passion for his mother”

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    Herophilos: The Father of Modern Science

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    Herophilos, the Father of Modern Science: A Brief Biography In Ancient Greece 335 B.C.E. a child was born in Chalcedon. This child would one day become one of the most influential parts of modern science and medicine as we know it. The baby boy’s name was Herophilos. Not much is known about Herophilos except that he moved away from Chalcedon (now Turkey) and moved to Alexandria early in his life (1). When Herophilos finished his education he became a teacher and an author (1). There are

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    King Lear and Madness in the Renaissance

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    King Lear and Madness in the Renaissance It has been demonstrated that Shakespeare's portrayal of madness parallels Bright's A Treatise of Melancholie (Wilson 309-20), yet, the medical model alone is insufficient to describe the madness of Shakespeare’ s King Lear. Shakespeare was not limited to a single book in his understanding of madness; he had at his disposal the sum total of his society's understanding of the issue. Since Lear's madness is derived from a mixture of sources, it can only

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    Film Critic Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close Just like most well received novels Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close has its own film adaptation by Stephen Daldry. It is just as impressive as the book itself, keeping the main storyline which is the best a film adaptation should do but in the other hand it has some changes that are very hard to go unnoticed. The cast is probably the main reason for the great result of the film. For the main roles Daldry went for award-winning actors such as Sandra

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    In the poem, “35/10” by Sharon Olds, the speaker uses wistful and jealous tones to convey her feeling about her daughter’s coming of age. The speaker, a thirty-five year old woman, realizes that as the door to womanhood is opening for her ten year old daughter, it is starting to close for her. A wistful tone is used when the speaker calls herself, “the silver-haired servant” (4) behind her daughter, indicating that she wishes she was not the servant, but the served. Referring to herself as her

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    Critics trashed Michael Almereyda’s Hamlet, due in part to the acting of Ethan Hawke, which many reviewers viewed as too weak for the role (). However, these reviewers fail to recognize that “[Hamlet’s] nature changes from scene to scene” (Crosman 148), and therefore requires development as the storyline progresses. Similarly, Ophelia’s character experiences rather drastic changes following the death of her father. But, as Hawke received criticism for his descent into madness, Stiles’ Ophelia received

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    Revenge in Shakespeare's The Tempest

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    (1.2.350) In this portion of the website, I will examine those questions and attempt to provide an answer and an insight into the psychology of Prospero. Further, I will examine the relationship between Pr... ... middle of paper ... ...Melancholia in English Literature from 1508 to 1642. East Lansing, Michigan: Michigan-State University Press. 1951. 2. Bowers, Fredson. Elizabethan Revenge Tragedy. Princeton University Press. 1940. 3. Burton, Robert. The Anatomy of Melancholy

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    The Movie Melancholia

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    Melancholia Melancholia is a feeling of sadness and depression and what better way can you capture that, than with the world ending. Von Trier did a wonderful job depicting his way the world would end. In this film the way the world would wind up ending is the planet Melancholia would end up hitting earth. John the husband of Claire is always reassuring her that Melancholia will never hit the earth. Most of the time you begin to watch movies to take your mind off of worldly things but this brings

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    Melencolia I

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    “But what absolute beauty is I know not. Nobody knows it but God,” said Albrecht Durer, before creating his engraving (29 Finkelstein). Melencolia I, created in 1514, conveys this statement visually in the engraving about not being able to obtain divine knowledge. Part of a supposed series of large prints, Melencolia I belongs to the three virtues of medieval scholasticism, which are morality, theology, and intellectuality. Though linked to insanity, Renaissance studies indicate that melancholy

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    Phrenology Rubbing fingers and palms across a person’s head in order to analyze that person’s mental aptitude is the basis of phrenology. This was a common practice during the 19th century. It became especially popular in the latter half of the 19th century, around the same time great advances were being made with the telephone. Although these two topics were developing in the same era, they differ greatly in relevancy to today’s world, nearly 200 years later. The telephone is a means of long-distance

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