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    skirmish and pestilence bedeviled the era of the Middle Ages, the Medieval Church, with its dual-nature of inflicting disquietude and endowing absolvement and education, aided many men and women within the Society of Orders of Western Europe, offering these mortal lambs relief from their sinful, materialistic humanity while additionally reminding them of the anguish that could branch from their sins in the afterlife. Therefore, the Church, with its many bureaus and offices, oversaw the conduct of each

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    The Medieval Church and Dante's Inferno Some people think that the medieval churches view on sin, redemption, heaven and hell was very complex, but actually the churches views were straight and to the point. I will discuss with you what sin, redemption, heaven and hell were to the medieval churches and I will also share some examples in the story that will help you better understand The Inferno and the medieval churches views. Let's begin with sin. A sin was said to be a deliberate and purposeful

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    The Medieval Church, The Book of Margery Kempe and Everyman While the Reformation is generally regarded to have begun with Martin Luther’s famous treatise of 1517, the seeds of dissent sown in the 14th century had already taken full root in England by the middle of the 15th century. War, disease, and oppressive government led to a general anger toward the Catholic Church, believed to be “among the greatest of the oppressive landowners” (Norton 10). John Wycliffe, whose sermons

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    Longevity Insert Name Instructor Date   Medieval and Middle Age Church The medieval church is characterized by a period when their democracy of thoughts was not embraced by the church. This is because during this period, the church played a significant role in Medieval England. The church had great control or power when it came to the people’s thoughts, beliefs, as well as the communication. During this period, there is a likely indication that the church took full dominance over peoples’ lives.

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    The Church Had enormous influence over the people of medieval Europe and had the power to make laws and influence monarchs. The church had much wealth and power as it owned much land and had taxes called tithes. It made separate laws and punishments to the monarch’s laws and had the ability to send people to war. The church controlled the people of Europe's beliefs and determined holy days and festivals. The people who worked in the church were some of the most educate people. It was one of the powerful

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    the crisis in Christianity. In the Medieval church, there were issues with the papacy, clergy and Christian followers. Obviously, this crisis led European Christianity to weaken and even risk the danger of everything falling apart. In fact, the crisis began from one cause, wealth over faith and smaller (more specific) problems revolved around the one common problem. In the late medieval period, there was one big factor causing all the troubles between the church and the society, money. The popes

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    Throughout history, scholars recognize The Medieval Period as a pinpoint of religious, artistic, and expressive diversity. Many came to rely on the church, the only institution to survive the fall of Rome, and depended on its guidance. Eventually, people began to shape their lives around the Church and the way it functioned. As the Catholic Church expanded and thrived, divisions and disagreements occurred that resulted in a split- The Great Schism. European thinkers, writers, and artists began

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    rise of Christianity, specifically the Roman Catholic Church, which was created when a Roman Emperor named Constantine adopted Christianity as his own personal and the Roman Empire's official religion. From that time through the middle ages, Christianity grew in power and influence, the church enjoying a cozy relationship with the state. By the early fifth century, a mere one hundred years after Constantine issued the Edict of Milan, the church and state's power structure were deeply intertwined

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    Catholic Church had upon European society (1). Luther did not set out to be a revolutionary, but simply questioned the church 's marketing of indulgences that offered the buyer or their deceased loved one absolution from the penalty of sin (2). Luther’s famous “Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences,” or “95 Theses” argued against the sale of indulgences, but Luther also ultimately disagreed with many of the fundamental religious philosophies of the medieval Catholic Church. The religious

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    Between 1000 and 1300 were the Middle Ages, also referred to as the Age of Faith. During this time, the Roman Catholic Church dominated influencing much of the medieval culture and values. Christendom, the Christen community of this time, and their beliefs had infused the writings, art, drama, and music as well. However, by the thirteenth century, the fusion of architecture, sculpture, painting, metalwork, literature, and music had focused primarily of the Gothic Cathedral. With these cathedrals

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