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    Medea

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    work- Medea Country/Culture- Greek Literary Period- Classical Type of literature (genre)- Drama/Tragedy Author- Euripedes Authorial information- Euripedes lived from ca. 485 to ca. 406 B.C. making him younger thank Aeschylus and Sophocles, and making him the last of the great writers of tragedy in the golden age of Athens. His emphasis on human emotions and the psychology of individuals has proven more widely popular than philosophical beliefs shown in his older contemporary works. Medea, first

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    medea

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    An analysis of Medea through Aristotle’s Poetics Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, who lived during the period of 384 to 322 BC. He has been widely recognized throughout history as one of the most significant thinkers and philosophers. His work in Poetics has helped define the way in which Greek literature and even contemporary texts are read. To begin Aristotle helps us define what he considers tragedy and what he determines is not worthy of the term. He divides and analyzes one by one the parts

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    Barbarian In Medea

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    society. Most Greek plays only have women as non-essential characters or they don't have them at all. That is why Euripides' Medea, a tragedy where the woman is the main character, is intelligent because she is a "barbarian", is unexpected and

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    Medea

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    to agree with someone you do not like, or do not even know personally. When that person is a fictional character it is even more challenging. Medea is a very pitiful character, but she is also rather cunning in the way she carries out her actions. However, due to the overwhelming sense of wrong-doing, the reader may find it easy to identify with her. Medea makes a wonderful pathetic character because of her strange way of thinking and rationalizing, ability to manipulate people, and her strong desire

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    make a better situation by taking an offensive action against the person. The feeling of wanting revenge is caused by stress felt by humans, caused by emotional or physical trauma. Likewise, Medea starts her

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    Fate in Medea

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    conclusion of this story.” To an ancient Greek, fate was thought of as the power that determined all of our destinies, although a person could make choices along their life to change small outcomes, which was the extent of free will. In the play Medea, fate is used as a scapegoat to blame some of the problems happening to the characters, despite the fact that most of the characters had free will. In some instances the characters are not even aware of the causes behind the causes of their problems

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    Medea

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    The two Greek plays, Medea and Antigone both exhibit opening scenes that serve numerous purposes. Such as establishing loyalties, undermining assumptions on the part of the audience, foreshadowing the rest of the play, and outlining all of the issues. Medea and Antigone share many similarities in their openings. Both plays begin with providing the audience with the history and the consequences of certain situations that the characters were involved in. It also brings the audience to the present time

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    chorus role in medea

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    The Chorus influences our response to Medea and her actions in both a positive and negative manner. The Chorus, a body of approximately fifteen Corinthian women who associate the audience with the actors, is able to persuade and govern us indirectly through sympathy for what has been done to Medea, a princess of Colchis and the victim of her husband’s betrayal of love for another woman. The Chorus also lead us to through sympathy for Medea to accept her decision of taking revenge on princess Glauce

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    Seduction Theory In Medea

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    cause neurosis”, such as we have seen in Euripides’s Medea; in which Medea acted irrationally after having gone through traumatic events. Whether it was Freud in the 1890s or Euripides in 430 BC the idea that PTSD is present in one’s daily live has always been a suggestion. As Jacobs’s contribution to the American Journal of Psychotherapy named it, the “Medea Complex” (Jacobs. 2). The Medea Complex is the explanation for the downfall of Medea and her family. The famous Greek tragedy begins with

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    Euripides’ play, Medea, is an ambiguous narrative relating to self-serving feminism. Depending on one’s viewpoint, the title character can either be one of the most unconventional delegates of women’s rights or an oblivious saboteur willing to undermine the cause. With all factors from the play taken into account, signs point toward the former. Medea was a pioneer of feminism, acting as a driving force behind breaking the stereotypes assigned to women. Despite being a foreigner and having a questionable

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