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    Mechanisms of LSD

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    Mechanisms of LSD: a Glimpse into the Serotonergic System In 1938, Albert Hoffman discovered, invented a substance that would revolutionize the American drug culture forever and would change how we, as psychologists and biologists, thought about psychosis. That substance was LSD. A simple molecule, LSD has the potency that no other drug has. Only a drop will produce the desired hallucinations and euphoria. In addition, it does not seem to be physically addicting, although tolerance to the drug

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    Mechanisms of the Mind

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    Mechanisms of the Mind The human brain can be seen as one of nature's finest miracle. An object that weights merely three pounds is responsible for how we perceive reality, feel emotions, remember events and learn new things. For the past two decades, scientists and researchers have explored this hot field of neuroscience in hopes of finding some answers to how something so small is able to hold a lifetime of information. How exactly does the human brain retain experiences, thoughts, and memories

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    Proposed Mechanisms of Dreaming

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    Proposed Mechanisms of Dreaming New physiological discoveries made in the 1950's linked a particular phase of sleep with dreaming (8). This phase of sleep is known as the REM (rapid eye movement) phase. This newly acquired information spawned refreshed interest in the mechanisms (specifically neurophysiological mechanisms) of dreaming. Validity of the physiological and neurobiological approach to dreaming was supported by certain (current) clinically measured and observed behaviors accompanying

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    Neurobiological Mechanisms for Alcoholism

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    Neurobiological Mechanisms for Alcoholism While alcohol could well be considered the most socially acceptable psychoactive drug in our society, the dangers of alcohol abuse and addiction are well known. However, not everyone who uses, or even abuses, alcohol will actually become an alcoholic who is physically dependent on the drug. Not all of the mechanisms that cause one to become addicted to alcohol have been clarified. However, there seem to be two main reasons for alcohol addiction. One

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    The Defense Mechanism

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    Defense mechanism, in psychoanalysis, any of a variety of unconscious personality reactions which the ego uses to protect the conscious mind from threatening feelings and perceptions. Sigmund Freud first used defense as a psychoanalytic term (1894), but he did not break the notion into categories, viewing it as a singular phenomenon of repression. His daughter, Anna Freud, expanded on his theories in the 1930s, distinguishing some of the major defense mechanisms recognized today. Primary defense

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    Mechanisms and Processes of the Internet

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    Mechanisms and Processes of the Internet Electronic commerce can be defined as the conduct of commerce in goods and services, with the assistance of telecommunications and telecommunications-based tools. Here, the term telecommunications can mean any existing telecommunication networks such as Public Switched Telephone Network, Integrated Services Digital Network, or even Wireless Networks. However the major and the most important telecommunication network of E-commerce is the Internet. The

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    Effectiveness of the Price Mechanism Introduction In this essay I am going to analyse the workings and effectiveness of the price mechanism as a means of allocating and reallocating scarce resources. I am going to do this by comparing the free market economy with its alternatives and by looking at how government intervention allows the price mechanism to carry on working. I am also going to look at the role that we, as consumers, play in the workings of the price mechanism. Definition & Workings

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    defense mechanisms

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    Defense Mechanisms are defined as methods the ego uses to avoid recognizing ideas or emotions that may cause personal anxiety. In other words, it is our body’s way from hiding from emotional and physical pain. People use these methods so they do not hold quilt or pressure but many of times it adds to one’s stress level. In using these methods, there should be certain steps to take to ensure that stress does not overwhelm and consume the being. I have recently used denial, rationalization, and repression

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    The Mechanisms and Effects of Frost Heave

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    The Mechanisms and Effects of Frost Heave ABSTRACT Frost heave is the increase in volume experienced by soils when they freeze. Water moves to the upper horizons from below; when it freezes it forms segregated ice lenses which push apart the soil around them as they grow, causing the observed volume increase. Frost heave has a number of effects upon the soil and upon structures supported by the soil which make it an important process to understand. INTRODUCTION During the freezing of

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    Kinship as a Mechanism for Social Integrating It is often demonstrated in many anthropological studies that kinship acts as an important means for social integrating in a given society. But is it a fair generalization to say that kinship always functions as a mechanism for social integration? Kinship refers to the relationships established through marriage or descent groups that has been proven in some societies to lead to social integrating, or the process of interaction with other

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