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    camps where they were beaten, starved, and murdered. The novel Maus I: My Father Bleeds History by Art Spiegelman illustrates this by giving us a detailed encounter of the holocaust through the authors’ father’s experience. Spiegelman illustrates the Jews as mice because it symbolizes how the Jews were run off and were killed and hunted like vermin. The Germans were illustrated as cats because they were the “hunter”. The graphic novel Maus I: My Father Bleeds History gives you a personal view of the

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    Identity in Hurtson’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, Kingston’s Woman Warrior, and Spiegelman’s Maus Despite being a very diverse literature genre in terms of influence and inspiration, North American literature encompasses many works that share some very common thematic elements. Though there are several themes shared, one in particular can be found in most any work – the importance of identity. Particularly in some selected pieces yet to be named, identity is a very important element, not only

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    bring a child into this world and their priority is to love and protect their baby In a better and safe place have been traumatized of the past with incredible amount of horrifying memories and experiences? In Art Spiegelman's graphic novels, MAUS 1 and MAUS 2, he exposes the true story of his father, Vladek, and his experience as a Jew throughout the Holocaust through pictures and sketchy storytelling. The relationship between Art and his father is the essential description in the book as Art has

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    Joshua Brown says, “‘Unknowableness’ is the void separating the two generations, and the awareness of the limitations of understanding, of how remembering and telling captures and, yet, fails to capture the experience of the past, permeates Maus” (8). The novel Maus, in other words, tells the storyline that places out its own defects and the unavoidable faults of any retold story. The novel even shows that Vladek’s word should be questioned. At the start of the book, Vladek tells stories about this personal

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    By comparing, analyzing and questioning the validity of Maus I and II, Night, Night and Fog, nonfictional historical accounts and a poem, called Already Embraced by the Arm of Heavenly Solace, found in Europe in the Contemporary World, Schindler’s List and the Return to Auschwitz we may determine to what degree these sources serve to advance humanity’s understanding of the holocaust. The holocaust can be explained as the historical event in which the Nazi’s, who came to power in Germany in January

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    they face death and still strive? For example, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne show one of the boy’s risk simply to stay alive, and in Hiroshima by John Hersey Mrs. Nakamura pulls her children out desperately, what for? To survive. In Maus, II Anja lives through dehumanizing conflicts and is faced with death every day even though she suffers from a mental illness she still survives. The hunger to survive is greater than anything that keeps people alive when dealing with dreadful conflicts

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    Throughout history women, men, and children have all felt the pressures and manipulations by the media through some façade style form or shape. A Façade by definition is a false, superficial, or artificial appearance or effect, which is primarily imposed or placed on an object, group, or even individual. Through the use of words, deliberate images, and material items advertised within society, as a result have become pressures felt by all types of individuals. Many of these pressures forced upon

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    The Experience of Maus   The experience of being in the Holocaust is hard to imagine. The physical pain and fear that a survivor of the Holocaust felt could never fully be understood by anyone other than a fellow survivor. The children of survivors may not feel the physical pain and agony as their parents did, but they do feel the psychological effects. For this reason Artie and his father could never connect. The Holocaust built a wall between them that was hard to climb. Artie makes an attempt

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    story through a graphic novel, readers are easily able to understand the emotions and thought process of each character. The Visuals are very important in articulating the emotions that the author wants his or her reader to understand the story better. Maus I & II and Vietnamerica both have a motif of maintaining the safety and stability of their own family. While having this motif, it also has a narrator, who is also a character, that does not have these similar values. Having two different perspectives

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    Out of Kansas

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    Out of Kansas I find it on the high bookshelf—Maus: A Survivor’s Tale. I’ve heard about it. It’s about the Holocaust. Mice play the Jews, and cats play the German Nazis. I understand it already. Cats are predators to mice. That’s easy enough. I start reading. The Polish people are pigs. Wait a minute, I don’t get it. Why are they pigs? I’m getting confused. I want to give up. Instead, I pick it up and start again. We begin as moody troubleshooters: we see a puzzle piece that doesn’t fit—we

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