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    Maus Final Exam The Holocaust was a terrible and tragic time for Jewish people. They were constantly treated bad, harassed, and killed. The Nazi’s maintained many concentration camps, the most infamous of which being Auschwitz, where Vladek Spiegelman was sent to during the war. In the graphic novel, Maus, Art Spiegelman tells the tale of his father, Vladek, and his life during the Holocaust. In order to improve his chances of staying alive, Vladek got involved in helping the guards with certain

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    “The world. The world is not interested in us. Today everything is possible, even the crematoria…” - Elie Wiesel The graphic novel “Maus” is one Holocaust survivor’s tale, Vladek Spiegelman. Vladek lived through the Holocaust and along the way lost most if not all of his family. Art arrived at his fathers’ home to capture the story. Within the novel you bare witness to this very awkward father son relationship, you see how one managed to escape death when it is the only option, and the lasting impact

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    Personal, Social, and Cultural Contexts Established by the Frame Story in MAUS The use of the frame story, an overarching narrative used to connect a series of loosely related stories, pervades literature. An example of a frame story on a large scale - tying together a whole book-length work, not a simple short story - can be found in Art Spiegelman's graphic novel MAUS. Each of the narrative's six sections is framed with snatches of the interaction between Vladek and Art during the "interview"

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    the public scene. Evolving from newspaper strip comics to superhero stories in paperback periodicals, the world of comics spread further and further into public appeal. With the publication of Art Spiegelman’s Maus, however, comics opened the door onto a world of possibilities. After Maus received high acclaim, despite its academic taboo as a medium, many more historical-commentary graphic novels found their way into the public eye: Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, Keiji Nakazawa’s

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    By means of comic illustration and parody, Art Spiegelman wrote a graphic novel about the lives of his parents, Vladek and Anja, before and during the Holocaust. Spiegelman’s Maus Volumes I and II delves into the emotional struggle he faced as a result of his father’s failure to recover from the trauma he suffered during the Holocaust. In the novel, Vladek’s inability to cope with the horrors he faced while imprisoned, along with his wife’s tragic death, causes him to become emotionally detached

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    Father and a Son “Maus” weaves through the past and present to tell the story of Holocaust survivors Vladek and Anja Spiegelman as well as how Art, their son, dealt with the repercussions of his father’s experiences. The author, Art Spiegelman, wrote “Maus” in comic form and portrayed Jews as mice, Poles as pigs, and Germans as cats. “Maus Ⅰ” begins in mid-1930’s Poland with his soon to be wed parents and concludes with them at the gates of Auschwitz in the winter of 1944. In “Maus I: A Survivor’s

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    The graphic novels Maus and Maus II by Art Spiegelman possess the power to make the reader understand the pain and suffering that takes place during the Holocaust. Spiegelman uses animals instead of humans in his graphic novels to represent the different races of people. The use of visual mediums in Art Spiegelman’s Maus enhances the reading of the narrative. The graphics throughout the novel help the reader fully understand everything that is happening. The victims of the Holocaust lose sight of

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    Dehumanization in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and Maus Through out history we learn of the mistreatment of many different types of people. Several different groups of people have been prosecuted and singled out for many different types of reasons. In recent history, the African Americans and the Jews have been the focus of discrimination. Slavery and the Holocaust were made to make these groups of people feel inferior to those who were in control of them. During these two periods

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    Both Maus, written by Art Spiegelman, and Life is beautiful, directed by Roberto Benigni have two very different portrayals of the holocaust and their main characters both have different strengths that allow them and their families to keep afloat during the Holocaust. Vladek and Guido use their individual strengths to survive the prison camps and help their loved ones to survive as well. Both Vladek and Guido have families they need to keep track of while living in the harsh environment of the concentration

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    ruthless torture from the largest concentration camp during World War II in Auschwitz. His son, Art Spiegelman, tells two stories at once in his book Maus: one of his father’s experiences during the Holocaust and another of his present adversities with his father. Spiegelman’s book is unlike many of this genre. Written as a graphic novel, Maus allows readers to visualize Spiegelman’s feelings giving a new meaning to the famed maxim, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” Spiegelman doesn’t simply

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