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    these detrimental effects. Before we can even begin to attempt to understand the what, we must examine the why. In Maus psychological effects of the Holocaust are portrayed through the characters. Vladek’s various moments of trepidation and unease, the loss of Anja and the transgenerational effects on Artie himself are all significant examples of this.

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    Quiz Essay 3

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    Maus I and Maus II, written by Art Spiegleman, are a set of biographical graphic novels, which have a central theme of the need for survival. The narrative is that of Art's father, Vladek. He tells his story of surviving the Holocaust. Although Vladek is the narrator and the focus of the story, other characters emphasize this theme as well. Vladek's nephew Lolek is mentioned briefly in the first book, making decisions to further his survival. Some of these decisions include: living with Vladek's

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    story through a graphic novel, readers are easily able to understand the emotions and thought process of each character. The Visuals are very important in articulating the emotions that the author wants his or her reader to understand the story better. Maus I & II and Vietnamerica both have a motif of maintaining the safety and stability of their own family. While having this motif, it also has a narrator, who is also a character, that does not have these similar values. Having two different perspectives

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    In both “Maus” and “I See You”, the idea of losing and regaining power through signification is shown through the characters of Vladek and Smith. Despite both of these characters going through experiences that weakened their initial power, both were able to regain some power through finding meaning and significance in their lives. Despite this, it is unfortunately not enough seeing as in the end, both characters still lived with the burden of their initial deterioration. In both “Maus” and “I See

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    When the Holocaust is featured in literature, survival, interpersonal interactions, and resourcefulness of main characters is often shown. In Maus I and Maus II, Art Spiegelman utilizes the graphic novel format to tell the story of Vladek Spiegelman’s application of bilingual, bartering, and salesmanship skills to survive the tragic lifestyle of camps in the Holocaust. In contrast, in the memoir, Night, by Elie Wiesel, Elie portrays his family’s manipulation of lack of faith, prior knowledge of

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    famous examples of serious anthropomorphism in the history of comics: a Pulitzer prize-winning graphic novel entitled Maus, wherein a firsthand account of the Holocaust is told by Spiegelman’s father, Vladek, and illustrated within a metaphor of Jews as mice, Nazis as cats, Poles as pigs, and Americans as dogs. Art Spiegelman’s use of pictorial symbolism in Maus

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    Out of Kansas

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    Out of Kansas I find it on the high bookshelf—Maus: A Survivor’s Tale. I’ve heard about it. It’s about the Holocaust. Mice play the Jews, and cats play the German Nazis. I understand it already. Cats are predators to mice. That’s easy enough. I start reading. The Polish people are pigs. Wait a minute, I don’t get it. Why are they pigs? I’m getting confused. I want to give up. Instead, I pick it up and start again. We begin as moody troubleshooters: we see a puzzle piece that doesn’t fit—we

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    Renaissance Drama and Staging

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    seventeenth century, most plays that were written had a focal point of jealousy and had tragic endings. According to Katharine Eisaman Maus, “Anxiety about sexual betrayal pervades the drama of the English Renaissance” (561) and becomes the plot of many plays. Many critics cannot understand why many characters have the quality of being jealous and also to being curious. Maus continues to state, “Some critics are inclined to look for cultural explanations; for then the phenomenon reflects in a particularly

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    ruling German at the time and started this disturbing holocaust. Many Jews were dehumanized in this time. The Germans were horrible to the Jews and treated them like they were animals. The Germans had animalized the Jews as shown in the book Maus I and Maus II. Spiegelman depicts the Germans as cats and the Jews as mice because

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    education for teens in high school and even for adults in college has popped up. The book Maus II by Art Spiegelman is a graphic novel in which the reader follows Art’s father Vladek through Nazi Camps. The fact that Art used a graphic novel format was ground breaking and the idea that it was a historical reference made it even more unique. There are some comics that do show the

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    The Holocaust, and the Shoah specifically, blurred the definition of who was considered as people, and altered the way the outside world viewed the Jews. Andre Schwarz-Bart’s The Last of the Just and Art Spiegelman’s Maus I and Maus II focuses on the images of the different types of “insect” and other types of degrading animal images of the Jews during the Shoah. By drawing upon Edmund Russell’s article and Howard Stein’s article, one can come to understand how the portrayal of Jews as either animals

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    the capacity for such atrocious actions against other human beings, Staub’s claim is given merit by several authors in their own works regarding the events of the Holocaust and the nature and actions of human beings; specifically, Spiegelman’s Maus I and Maus II, Browning’s Ordinary Men, Bauman’s “The Dream of Purity,” and Sherman’s Bent support Staub’s accusatory claim. The aforementioned works support the notion that, given the proper conditions of existence, any otherwise normal human (that is,

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    you feel bad about proving your father wrong.” – Pavel “No matter what I accomplish, it doesn’t seem much compared to surviving Auschwitz.” Art Maus Volume 2, Page 44 The second portion of the semester has had a focus on how the Holocaust has continued to cause devastation and familial conflict even after the war ended. Of the texts we have read, Maus by Art Speigelman and Still Alive by Ruth Kluger were two very different accounts of the Holocaust, however there was one strong continuity between

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    Lit Essay

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    time of World War II, Art Spiegelman's Maus recount the story of Vladek Spiegelman's life as one of the survivors of holocaust and the pain of his struggle to stand during those dark ages. Likewise, Thanhha Lai's Inside Out and Back Again also recite the effort and agony that a Vietnamese family had to go through during the Vietnam War, how they strive to survive and how they adapt as the refugees of the war. It can be found that Art Spiegelman's book, Maus and Thanhha Lai's book, Inside Out and

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    The Fight to Survive!

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    and Art Spiegelman in Maus I & II use themes of loss of hope and survival to underscore the difficulties of the holocaust, the different father/son relationships and guilt that results in each suggests that the generation gap affected the outlook of the war in each of the sons’ eyes. “Stronger than cold or hunger, stronger than the shots and the desire to die, condemned and wandering, mere numbers, we were the only men on earth.” (Night 83). Elie of Night and Vladek of Maus both survived the Holocaust

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    not only what happened to their parents. In the story of Maus, these horrors are written down by the son of a Holocaust survivor, Vladek. Maus is not only a story of the horrors of the concentration camps, but of a son, Artie, working through his issues with his father, Vladek. These issues are shown from beginning to end and in many instances show the complexity of the father-son relationship that was affected from the Holocaust. Maus not only shows these matters of contentions, but that the

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    The Art Of Survival

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    Unfortunately, there was never enough food, never sufficient shelter, and the cloths were never good enough. The methods of survival portrayed in the novels Maus by Art Spieglmen and Night by Elie Wiesel are distinctly different, but undeniably similar. The means of survival in the book Night differ greatly from the means of survival in Maus. In Night, there is more of a ruthless demeanor in their struggle to survive. This is evident especially in the intense struggle for food. And example of

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    Eye Opener

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    take action towards this race completely because his ideal human was only a blonde and blue eye (Witherbee, 1-4.). It is important that people everywhere today and generations to come have knowledge of this disaster. In the books Maus I: My Father Bleeds History and Maus II: And Here My Troubles Began by Art Spiegelman has affected myself and my view very much. Also, within this book it can better inform and help others be better citizens. To have this knowledge of an attempt made by Adolf Hitler

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    Examining the Validity of Holocaust Sources

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    divergent advantages and strategies, which allow humanity to have a clearer understanding of the holocaust; when compared, the resources’ limitations become apparent. The graphic novel Maus appears less valid compared to the diary, Night with its heinous detailed experience of life in a concentration camp. Conversely, Maus exhibits a strong expression of themes throughout the novel; comparably, this is a restriction in the textbook, Europe in the Contemporary world. Primary sources also aid in having

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    Through the Eyes of One Survivor

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    Not sure whether to help those in need or protect yourself: that was the tearing dilemma that Vladek and Anja Spiegelman were confronted with during the Holocaust. The novel MAUS by Art Spiegelman gives its readers not only a book for words, but a book for watching, watching what events took place during Hilter’s Europe. Art Spiegelman, known as Artie, picks through his father, Vladek’s, brain and gives his audience a story of a memorable experience of trust, reunion, and polar opposites of betrayal

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