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    Somerset Maugham

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    Somerset Maugham Somerset Maugham was born on January 25, 1874 in Paris where his father was the solicitor to the British Embassy. However, he was orphaned at the age of ten and lived with his uncle, the vicar of Whitstable, in England. Maugham was educated in England studying literature and philosophy at Heidelberg University. In 1897 he qualified as a surgeon from St. Thomas’ medical school and practiced for a year in the slums of London. However, he abandoned medicine after the success of

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    The author of this book wrote the story as if it were a true account of events. The author himself is not a main character in the story, but observes the lives of the main characters from his experiences with them with a vast and deep understanding of their lives. The first character introduced is Elliot Templeton. Elliot a wealthy European aristocrat, throws extravagant parties and entertains individuals of very high social class. Elliot brings the author into his social crowd and they become

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    William Somerset Maugham By looking at Of Human Bondage, one can see that William Somerset Maugham included themes of relationships and life patterns because they played a major role in his life. He took his life experiences and put them into his books. This made him very successful, but he still seemed to have trouble finding his place in society. Both Maugham and his characters had personal struggles with family and themselves and that is what makes his books so good for all ages of readers to

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    Gauguin’s Hiva Oa

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    the remaining years of his life. In The Moon and Sixpence, the narrator describes the place by saying, “the beauty of the island is unveiled as diminishing distance shows you in distincter shape its lovely peaks…for Tahiti is smiling and friendly” (Maugham 160). This is an excellent description of the island, and it is little wonder that Gauguin found solace here. Hiva Oa is on the southern coast of Tahiti and is the most fertile and well known of the Marquisas group of islands, of which there are six

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    Mr. Know-all

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    the night air rigidly excluded." We can see that the narrator of the story likes Englishmen very much and that's way he says that he wouldn't be so unhappy about his fellow mate if his name would be Smith or Braun. By this we can understand that Maugham is a patriot - he likes only his countrymen. But the narrator makes a mistake thinking that Max Kelad is not an Englishman - indeed he is. As we get to know Mr. Max Kelad we find out that he is boastful because as soon as he met the storyteller

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    Franny And Zooey & The Razor’s Edge Many novels use religion as the central object of their plot. Franny and Zooey, by J.D Salinger and The Razor’s Edge, by W. Somerset Maugham both display religion as having they key role in their novels. Religion is the main guide in Franny and Zooey and The Razor’s Edge for the search of meaning. During the search for meaning the two main characters Franny Glass and Larry Darrel, use religion as an escape from everyday life and from bad memories

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    British Cuisine

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    Some time ago Somerset Maugham said that "to eat well in England, you should have breakfast three times a day.' To be perfectly honest, most British food was considered by many people as terrible. It included overcooked vegetables, boring sandwiches and greasy sausages. It was definitely not an enjoyable experience. However, these are now only stereotypes. Things have changed a lot and food has become very important in British culture. Not only TV cooks are more famous than writers, but also their

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    The History of Hysteria

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    of its writing. Included in these ideas is Hysteria, mentioned clearly when the narrators describes the doctor’s view of Blanche’s attempt to kill herself as “just a hysterical woman who had quarreled with her lover...it was constantly happening. (Maugham 123). The following will describe the development, symptoms and treatment of Hysteria. Hysteria, considered a “neurotic illness” (www.a2zpsychology.com/a2z%20guide/hysteria.htm) was considered a disorder in which a person, usually a woman, exhibited

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    Ambulance Drivers during World War I

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    new many recruits had to first learn how to drive. Because of the number of better educated volunteers, there were a significant number of famous authors that were ambulance drivers during World War I. They included Ernest Hemingway, W. Somerset Maugham, and E.E. Cummings (Literary). Three predominant volunteer ambulance groups were active in World War I: the American Field Service (AFS), Norton-Harjes, and the American Red Cross. When the United States entered the war, the AFS and Norton-Harjes

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    indulged lives we don’t take a moment to step back and look deeply at the true characters of the people around us. Instead we are happier with making our unsupported judgments on people and continuing to go about our own concerns. Mr. W. Somerset Maugham wrote a story called, Mr. Know-All, that shows us how we too often tend to act judgmental towards others, but later when we pause and take a closer look, we may find that they are truly greater in character than we are. The story starts with the narrator

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    Origins of Expressionism

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    Origins of Expressionism Exhibited in The Moon and Sixpence by Somerset Maugham, Expressionism differed greatly from its predecessor, Impressionism. Unlike Impressionism, Expressionism’s “goals were not to reproduce the impression suggested by the surrounding world, but to strongly impose the artist's own sensibility to the world's representation” (Web museum 1). In Expressionism, “the artist seeks to depict not objective reality but rather the subjective emotions and responses that objects

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    the literature of the time seems a sound one, and perhaps one way of more fully understanding the underpinnings of humanity during the Modern period. Works Cited Larsen, Nella. Quicksand. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers UP, 1996. Maugham, W. Somerset. The Moon and Sixpence. New York: Penguin Books Ltd., 1944. Stevens, Wallace. Opus Posthumous. New York: Alfred K. Knopf, 1957. Valéry, Paul. Selected Writings of Paul Valéry. New York: New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1950

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    Great Britain as a worldwide system of colonies dominated the world for some three centuries. The first uncertain British attempts to establish overseas settlements were made as early as the sixteenth century. Huge economic and trade success, plus maritime expansion, resulted in the seventeenth century in the establishment of settlements in North America and the West Indies. The East India Company established its first trading posts in India at the beginning of the seventeenth century and the same

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    abusive spouse or of a deceased loved one, for example, can now walk out of the cold, dark dungeon into the light, ready to start the first day of the rest of his life. One literary character achieves this freedom. In Of Human Bondage, W. Somerset Maugham portrays, through the main character of Philip Carey, spiritual and sexual bonds that are ultimately broken. Carey’s only spiritual bondage comes from perhaps the biggest and most widely known religion of all time: Christianity. After his mother’s

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    Literature and Life in Of Human Bondage In the novel Of Human Bondage, the reader comes across a truly magnificent quote on page 627.  This quote is: "He had lived always in the future, and the present always, always had slipped through his fingers."  In and of itself, this is a very powerful quote.  However, it can be given even more power and significance if a person can relate this quote to their own life and experiences.  I myself, after reading this quote, was instantly able to identify with

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    The Razor's Edge Analysis

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    In a conversation with Maugham about sin, Larry points out, “Their badness was due to heredity, which they couldn’t help, or to their environment, which they didn’t choose.” (256) Therefore, Larry believes that people lack the free will to commit sin, meaning that the evil in the

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    "The essence of the beautiful is unity in variety." - W. Somerset Maugham It's not a secret that our world is far from being perfect. But both now and always there are people who want to make it better. Some of them expresses this through the arts, someone tries to take actions. Bit by bit people have changed their mind about world's arrangement, but the main problems still remain. Our community should be ashamed of social differentiation, poverty, and illiteracy, because this is what divides us

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    The text I'm going to analyse represents a short-story, entitled "THE LUNCHEON", written by a prominent, English novelist, short-story writer, playwright and essayist Somerset Maugham. First of all I'd like to say some words about the title of the text "The Luncheon". The title of the text is rather ironical. If we consult a dictionary, we can find out that the word "luncheon" means a "light snack", but as we can see hereinafter a light snack turns to be an abundant and expensive meal. The text

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    W. Somerset Maugham advises, “When you choose your friends, don't be short-changed by choosing personality over character.” Personality, the distinctive qualities that shape a person’s social attractiveness, can deceivably conceal a person’s character, the moral or ethical qualities that form a person’s individual nature. Maugham regards a conscientious but uncharismatic person with more merit than a charming but depraved person – the reason being that true friendship should provide integrity,

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    In The Razor’s Edge, W. Somerset Maugham explores the different meanings of success, through the conflicting ideals of his characters. The different interpretations of success are shown prominently through the views of Elliott Templeton and Laurence Darrell. Elliot for most of his life views success as becoming socially eminent and Larry believes success is happiness and the reaching of a state of enlightenment. The epigraph of The Razor’s Edge, “The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over;

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