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    Matthew Henson

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    Matthew Henson Great Men Have Great Assistants “As I stood there on the top of the world and I thought of the hundreds of men who had lost their lives in their effort to reach it [North Pole], I felt profoundly grateful that I had the honor of representing my race.” With these words, Matthew Henson planted the American flag on the North Pole. During the past, black Americans have not received the acknowledgement they deserved. Such was the case of Matthew A. Henson. He was the first

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    Matthew Henson Biography

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    Seclusion. This is the story of Matthew Henson’s life. Henson accomplished so much, yet, because of the color of his skin, didn’t receive the recognition he deserved until his old ages. To be clear, Matthew Henson persevered through prejudice and unforgiving terrain, became an important explorer of the Arctic, and was rewarded for his deeds. One of Henson’s most admirable traits was his perseverance and determination. Before his job with Peary (the man Henson later assisted), he worked aboard

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    Jim Henson: The Mind Behind the Muppets

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    Jim Henson: The Mind Behind the Muppets "Sure, Jim the creator was a genius. Yet I see Jim foremost as an appreciator. He appreciated the Muppet family and his own family. He appreciated flying kites with his children. He appreciated beauty and he appreciated fun." -Frank Oz (Readers Digest, 126) There is no doubt in Frank Oz's mind that Jim Henson was a creative genius. According to the model of creativity proposed by Howard Gardner, Henson can be considered creative in five of the seven intelligences:

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    Jim Henson

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    Jim Henson Jim Henson once said, “Follow your enthusiasm. It’s something I’ve always believed in. Find those parts of your life you enjoy the most. Do what you enjoy doing” (qtd. in Fionaurora). Jim did just that. He loved puppetry and made many others love it too. The creator and a performer of the Muppets, Henson is known worldwide for his creations, which include shows like Sesame Street and The Muppet Show, and characters such as Grover, Elmo, Big Bird, the Swedish Chef, Bert and Ernie

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    Jim Henson

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    JIM HENSON Jim Henson was born on September 24, 1936, in Greenville, Mississippi. He moved to Maryland in fifth grade and throughout his childhood had a strong interest in both art and television. His grandmother was very supportive of his interests and constantly encouraged him to use his imagination. In 1954 Jim started in television performing puppets on a local channel’s Saturday morning program. The next year, while studying at the University of Maryland, he was given a five-minute show called

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    Television is a drug. Although when first invented it was used as a family entertaining device, its purpose has been greatly altered. Now with over sixty channels to choose from, people of all ages can easily find a show that will grab their attention. This, however, is not the problem. The problem is caused when the person starts to change their daily routine in order to tune in to their favorite programs. Television acts as a drug in that it can help or hinder an individual based on their needs

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    Be Considerate of your Actions When is the last time you played with a puppet? Everybody remembers using them at some point, controlling what they do and what they say. An old yet popular one is the marionette puppet. This one is controlled by strings from above the puppet. The puppeteer is usually not visible to add the effect that it is moving and talking on its own. Another definition of a puppet is a person, party, or state under the control of another person, group, or power. One of the most

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    Labyrinth, by Jim Henson

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    In Jim Henson’s Labyrinth the plot closely follows the narrative structure that is documented by Propp and described by Berger. Propp establishes a series of functions which all Russian fairy tales followed and which Berger finds easily applies to modern day narratives. When these functions are applied to Labyrinth, they fit easily into the movies story line. The protagonist, Sarah, is an adequate example of Propp’s hero with some gender norms reversed and Jareth fits into the archetype of the

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    Positive Effects of Television Upon Children

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    Positive Effects of Television Upon Children Without a doubt, television is the central and principal form of communication in many people’s lives. This form is most often exposed to a child who instantly becomes accustomed to its presence. Children are televisions largest audience, as Morris shows, “Children aged two to five look at the TV tube on an average of 28.4 hours a week; those between the ages of six and eleven average 23.6 hours a week”. Television has played an important role in many

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    A Study of Perspectives

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    A Study of Perspectives Livingston's documentary Paris is Burning inspired an awareness of being that I had not previously experienced. The film urges the spectator to reevaluate not only one's breadth of knowledge of the black gay culture in the 80's, but also the perspectives from which one views the film. Personally speaking, the easiest evaluation of the latter topic would be the perspective of a privileged white straight female born into a sheltered and socially traditional household. This

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    it is easy to dismiss the true impact of television on education, whether it is, in fact, educational or not. Jim Henson was not one of those to so easily dismiss the chance to use television to educate children. Jim Henson said it best himself, “Television is basically teaching whether you want it or not.” As Creator of the well beloved characters of Sesame Street, The Muppets, Henson has touched the lives of millions of children worldwide. Sesame Street continues to be the longest running program

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    On was a saturday morning around seven in the morning, my mom comes bursting through the doors of my sister and I’s room. She tells us to hurry and get dressed because we were going on an adventure. My sister and I got ready as fast as we could and ran to the car. As we were driving my sister and I could not imagine what amazing place we were going to. Then all of a sudden the big yellow signs appears...Sesame Place! Screaming with joy and laughter, we ran to the gate and our amazing day began. Looking

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    Commodore Matthew Perry: American Black Ships in the Land of the Samurai One hundred and fifty years ago, an American commodore was assigned by the American President to go to “the barbarian land.” The commodore’s name was Matthew Perry and the land was Japan (Walworth 18). He was curious enough to become interested in the mission, even though it was said that “the Japanese were the least interesting people in the world” at that time (Graff 63). Japan had been closed to the outside world

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    Classical Design Elements In Architecture

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    works to achieve simplicity and harmony. “The preeminent architect of the Mannerist style was Andrea di Pietro, known as Palladio”(Matthews And Platt 340). The work that Palladio is most synonymous with is the Villa Capra, also known as the Villa Rotunda. The Villa Rotunda, based on the Classical design of a Roman farmhouse, was built for a wealthy Venetian (Matthews and Platt 340,341). The Villa highlights Classical principles of architecture in a number of ways. Palladio employed the use of

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    Roman Architecture

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    legacy that would influence later buildings (Cornell and Matthews 11). According to legend, the city of Rome was founded in about 753 BC, by a group of shepherds. It sat at an ideal location, along 7 hills on the Tiber River 15 miles from the Mediterranean Sea in present day Italy. Situated in an ideal defensive location it grew. Roman rule spread throughout the Italian peninsula due to its military strength and diplomacy (Cornell and Matthews 17). The first settlements discovered in Rome were

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    Matthew B. Brady

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    Mathew B. Brady: Civil War Photographer Mathew B. Brady: Civil War Photographer was written by Elizabeth Van Steenwyk. Elizabeth Van Steenwyk has written many good books for young people including: Saddlebag Salesmen, The California Missions, Frederic Remington, The California Gold Rush: West with the Forty-Niners, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett: Woman of Courage. Elizabeth now lives in San Marino, California with her husband. Mathew B. Brady was born somewhere between 1823 and 1824. His early life

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    Inherit the Wind - Character Development of Matthew and Sarah Brady Films with intense legal themes generally present very dry, professional characters with occasional moments of character development. In the film Inherit the Wind, the head legal counsel for the prosecution, Matthew Harrison Brady, first appears as a dynamic man of the people. He and his wife, Sarah, seem to be a perfect couple in the spotlight of American politics. Both characters wear broad smiles, walk tall and proud

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    Literary Criticism of Matthew Lewis’ Novel, The Monk Elliot B. Gose's essay "The Monk," from Imagination Indulged: The Irrational in the Nineteenth-Century Novel, is a psychological survey of Matthew Lewis' novel The Monk. Gose uses Freud's and Jung's psychological theories in his analysis of The Monk's author and characters. To understand Gose's ideas, we must first contextualize his conception of Freud's and Jung's theories. According to Gose: According to Freud we must look behind conscious

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    Matthew Arnold's Dover Beach Great works of poetry convey a feeling, mood, or message that affects the reader on an emotional, personal level. Great works of poetry can do that -- translate a literal story/theme -- but masterpieces, like Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach," are a double-edged sword, containing a second, figurative theme -- a message between the lines and underneath the obvious. Not only is Matthew Arnold's 1867 poem, "Dover Beach," a unique and beautiful literary work describing

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    Reflective Research Paper

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    rather than in mathematics, science, or engineering (Levin & Matthews, 1997). Gender inequities start in school due to teacher interaction, language, role models, gender expectations, and the method in which the curriculum will be taught. Learning about gender-equity issues simply by reading or hearing about them is not the same as seeing, thinking about, and reflecting on examples of them. In a 1997 article, Levin and Matthews explain that teachers and teacher educators need to be made aware

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