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    Prozac: Mania

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    Prozac: Mania "Yeah, I'm on Prozac," I hear quite often, said as if the speaker had just received a new Porsche. I often do catch myself responding with, "I'm on Zoloft isn't modern medicine great?" In a way, this exchange is a way of bonding. In another, more twisted way, it is a way of receiving a stamp of approval from my peers, for antidepressants have become extremely widespread and widely accepted. "Prozac...has entered pop culture...becoming the stuff of cartoons and stand-up comedy routines"

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    often absent in children. There is a question about the similarity of the symptoms of bipolar activities between adults and children’s, if severe, non-episodic irritability is a developmental presentation of pediatric mania (while euphoria would be most characteristic of adult mania). It could be concluded that there is a group of severely impaired children who show symptoms that overlap with bipolar disorder but did not show strong diagnosis – this could potentially be a new, different disorder.

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    Essay On Bipolar Mania

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    in between. Bipolar disorder affects the way people live. Bipolar patients have something called bipolar mania, and bipolar depression. Bipolar depression is when you feel depressed, sad, upset, or frustrated. Bipolar mania is exactly the opposite. You feel great, you are happy, and you don’t need much sleep. Episodes of bipolar depression last 3x longer than bipolar manic does. Bipolar mania is a lifelong disorder. It isn’t something that you can cure. The cause of bipolar disorder is not entirely

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    Living with Depression, Mania, and Medication Depression joined my life shortly after I entered middle school and tagged on persistently through my adolescent years. At first, my sullen moods were brushed off as mere hormonal changes, but I quickly became aware there was something more behind them. The severity of depression is difficult to explain without personal thoughts and examples. I know that my depression is coming long before it sets in. There is a cloud of forewarning that starts to

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    The Problem: Rewrite Mania I have been noticing a certain trend in software toward rewriting successful tools and standards. It seems that programmers always have the urge to make things better, which is perfectly understandable - after all, this is the primary trait of the engineer's mind (although I also think that artistic creativity also enters in the mix). Why should things stay static? Surely progress is good, and if we just stayed in the same place, using the same versions of tools without

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    Full Mania Case Studies

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    Disorders, 2013). Differential Diagnosis Diagnostic criteria for other mood or depressive disorders were unmet and/or her symptoms were better explained by another disorder. For example, while she met five of the ten diagnostic criteria for full mania in Bipolar I Disorder, the full range of symptoms were better explained by this diagnosis. Additionally, the description of her acute panic attacks was insufficient to qualify for a panic disorder, so a specifier was added for a more complete diagnosis

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    so the stock market in order to finance trade ventures in the Indies, and in doing so, establish Amsterdam as a global trade and financial power in Europe. Yet, this same economic prowess also brought about financial disaster in the form of Tulip Mania in the 1630s as speculators who had once bet on the VOC had transitioned to tulips, causing destabilization within the economy. It was this process of first establishing commerce, investing in local trade, and foundation of banks and other financial

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    Bipolar Disorder: The Angel and Devil In One

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    Bipolar Disorder: The Angel and Devil In One There was once a family; however, it was not a happy family. The mother was sick though she did not believe she was sick. She frightens her family with her explosive personality. She would shout at her children, pushing them to the edge and over to do their best. Her husband would constantly plead with her to go to the doctors and to take her medications. She never listened to him. One day when the husband returned from work, he found that his wife had

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    causes a person to suffer extreme emotional changes and shifts in mood. Previously known as manic-depressive disorder, bipolar disorder causes alternate periods of mania and depression. To fully understand the effects of this disease, it is important to comprehend the meanings of mania and depression. Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary defines mania as “excitement manifested by mental and physical hyperactivity, disorganization of behavior, and elevation of mood.” Depression, on the other hand, is defined as

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    Bi- Polar disorder? It is a condition formerly known as Manic Depressive Disorder that involves depressive episodes along with periods of elevated moods known as mania. Symptoms of mania include an abnormally elevated mood, irritability, an overly inflated sense of self-esteem, and distractibility. Persons experiencing an episode of mania are generally talkative, have a decreased need for sleep, and may engage in reckless or risk-taking behaviors. What is it like for a child that is diagnosed with

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    s

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    generally go through periods of mania, hypomania and depression. When patients are in the mania or depressed state they can experience psychotic symptoms. The mania or manic episode for some state that they typically don’t sleep or sleep less than normal. This is due to the disruption in their circadian rhythms which is referred to the “body clock”. It’s the 24 hour cycle which tells our body when to sleep and regulates many other physiological processes. When there in the mania stage they feel like they

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    Mr. Jones Case Study

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    Introduction Bipolar disorder is an overwhelming mental illness that can affect one’s life drastically. Bipolar is a disorder that is characterized by recurring episode of mania and depression. Most people who suffer from bipolar disorder are often misdiagnosed, and undergo ineffective treatments, which may hinder recovery and lead to the progression of the illness. In the movie “Mr. Jones”, (1993) the main character experiences broad symptoms of bipolar disorder that lead to an improper diagnosis

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    Bipolar Disorder Analysis

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    emotions to many unbearable extremes. It was deemed Bipolar Disorder in the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Being Bipolar means to be depressed, but to also go through periods of moods such as elation or Mania. Depression is in our genes as a natural response to life’s everyday let downs and is a completely normal feeling set into action by our brains chemical and electrical messages. Being depressed may be a natural emotion, but when those chemical messages

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    previous two poems because it focuses solely on Dickinson’s mania, and goes inside of the speaker’s brain to understand what the speaker’s “madness” feels like (Dickinson, n.d.b). In the first two stanzas, the speaker describes the “terrible” thing she endured, and is “grateful” the day is over (Dickinson, n.d.b). In order to cope with her feelings from the terrible day, the speaker decides to write (Dickinson, n.d.b). One of the symptoms of mania is having “a lot of energy” and having “increased activity

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    abnormally energized, both physically and mentally. Often a person with mania will feel as if they can do everything and

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    Marya Hornbacher

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    and are characterized by extreme happiness. During a manic episode the subject often refuses to believe facts that other people are telling them and in extreme cases believe they are a mythical god or a different person altogether. Another sign of mania is fast speech and incomplete sentences. In order to be classified as bipolar disorder the clinician must identify one or more manic episode in the history of the patient (Rivas-Vazquez, et al). The treatment of bipolar disorder is varied and has

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    Bipolar- Abnormal Psychology

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    SUMMARY- For our final project we chose to study Abnormal Psychology. Before we could start this study we first needed a good idea of what exactly defined something or someone to be abnormal. Psychologists struggle to precisely distinguish from normality and abnormality. Many definitions are used to define abnormality but all of them have their advantages and disadvantages. “Abnormality as deviation from the average” is one definition that is used. This definition is based on that we observe and

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    Mania In King Lear

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    Dementia, mania, narcissistic personality disorder, sadistic personality disorder, and the list does not stop there. A mental illness is described as a disorder that affects a person's mood, thoughts, or behavior. There are many examples of mental illness in William Shakespeare's "King Lear." This play is about a king who wants to divide his kingdom among his daughters, but encounters some difficulties along the way. Exploring the mental illnesses of King Lear, Edmund, and Goneril show that there

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    Bipolar Disorder and Its Management

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    sometimes it is a problem. Some people have bipolar disorder, and they tend to overlook it. Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder, also known as manic depressive disorder or manic depression. This is when people experience episodes of hysteria known as mania—“a state of abnormally elevated or bad-tempered moods and energy levels” (Test and diagnosis, January 18, 2012). Bipolar disorder has different types of episodes, causes, and management of which people may not be aware. One type of episode is a depressive

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    Bipolar Disorder

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    Disorder What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is one of the many mood disorders that are often overlooked and should not be taken lightly. It is sometimes called manic-depressive illness or manic-depression, which involves cycles of depression and mania. Sometimes the mood switches from high to low and back again. Bipolar disorder is a complex physiological and psychological disorder that can influence and manipulate a person's thoughts and actions in their daily life. Although it has yet to be found

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