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    Man Ray

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    Man Ray Man Ray, the master of experimental and fashion photography was also a painter, a filmmaker, a poet, an essayist, a philosopher, and a leader of American modernism. Known for documenting the cultural elite living in France, Man Ray spent much of his time fighting the formal constraints of the visual arts. Ray’s life and art were always provocative, engaging, and challenging. Born Emanuel Rabinovitch in 1890, Man Ray spent most of his young life in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The eldest

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    Man Ray was an American visual artist, sampling Surrealist and Dada art through his photographs and paintings. He was originally born Emmanuel Radnitzky on August 27, 1890 and lived with his parents, (who were Jewish immigrants) in Pennsylvania. He is most known for his fascinating photograms which he later renamed rayographs (in honor of himself, and most importantly because he redefined photograms in his photography). Even though he was born in America, and most of his fundamental artistic skills

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    Ray Charles: A Blind Man Sees A World of Possibilities In a world of darkness, misunderstanding, and confusion, there was a light of hope. Ray Charles was able to stand up and face this world, and he set out to pursue the impossible. Ray Charles overcame his disabilities by becoming a musician despite his blindness, stopping the use of heroin, and performing even though there were segregated audiences and unfair treatment. To begin with, Ray Charles overcame his disabilities by becoming a musician

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    The man behind the clown Thomas A. Edison once said, “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.” Ray Kroc was successful because he kept trying no matter how many people put him down. Also, if he succeeded in one thing he kept on going and fulfilling his other goals to continue. He had confidence and motivation in himself as a person and that contributed to his success. He set realistic goals for himself and had strived to be the best. He was hard working since young and knew

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    Thought Provoking Illustrations in The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury Ray Bradbury first introduces us to the Illustrated Man in Wisconsin, on a warm afternoon in early September. The Illustrated Man is shown to be large and well built, 'but now, for some reason, going to fat'. ===================================================================== His outfit is odd-a woollen shirt buttoned to the top and with cuffs tight. Although this makes him sweat, he pays no attention to it.

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    Chronicles, and The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, and The Illustrated Man are three of Ray Bradbury's most famous books. Ray Bradbury has written thousands of published items from poetry to short stories to three hundred page books; he has done it all. Bradbury's best writing combines a great imagination with a poetic style of its own. Ray Bradbury, an American author was born on August 22, 1920 in Waukegan, Illinois. Ray is the third son of Leonard Spaulding

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    “Survival of the fittest” is a theory that was introduced by Charles Darwin, but many American novels have proven that being the “fittest” is not the only component to survival. In novels, such as The Road by Cormac McCarthy and The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury, one very important factor involved with survival is the bonds between people. William Glasser, an American psychiatrist that developed reality therapy and choice theory, stated that, “We are driven by five genetic needs: survival, love

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    A Comparison of ‘The Man Who Could Work Miracles,’ by H.G Wells and ‘A Sound of Thunder,’ by Ray Bradbury In comparison, both stories inspire me into discussing the immense differences they both have between each other. Both stories have extreme similarities; yet, they have miraculous differences. Both ‘The Man Who Could Work Miracles,’ and ‘A Sound of Thunder’

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    Man Ray’s Violin D’Ingres is a perfect example of a modernist photograph. Man Ray pushes both how photography is perceived and what is possible within a photograph in this example. Man Ray himself was an American, born as Emmanuel Rudnitsky, but moved to Paris and engaged in very non-American photography. Europe lacked the American ideals about what “strait photography” should be. While American schools of photography believed that an art photograph should only be made with a large negative with

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    Surrealism Essay

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    unavailability, envisioning the manufacture of the doll in their image, which he probed’ “with aggressive fingers”, and captured rapaciously by his “concious gaze.” (Taylor, 2010) Bellmer’s work encapsulated Surrealism. It was a true reflection of the man within. It gave him a channel for his disturbing appetites, and the internal darkness that threatened to envelop him. Without the outlet that Surrealism gave him, I find myself asking the question, would Bellmer have been able to control those urges

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