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    and in 1797 William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy moved to Alfoxden House, which was only a few miles from Coleridge’s home. The creative partnership between these two young poets would eventuate in the first publishing of Lyrical Ballads. The publication of Lyrical Ballads represented a turning point for English poetry. It was released anonymously on October 4th, 1798 and the learned old guard of literary England was mostly unaware that a form of “literary revolution” had taken place. Previous

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    Emily Kotroco Paper 1 Wordsworth poems “Tintern Abbey” and “Preface to Lyrical Ballads” During Wordsworth time as a poet he made it his mission to have poetry be read by not only the aristocrats but also now the common man something that has never been done. In both poems Wordsworth makes his poems relatable by incorporating themes that everyone can relate to even if they haven’t personally had that experience, although both poems do differ when it comes down to structure and form but also when

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    Dialogue and Monologue in the 1798 Lyrical Ballads Commemorating the bicentennial of the 1798 Lyrical Ballads implies something about the volume's innovations as well as its continuity. It is no longer possible to believe that 'Romanticism' started here (as I at least was taught in school). Even if we cannot claim 1798 as a hinge in literary history, though, there is something appealing about celebrating the volume's attitude to newness, as well as the less contentious fact of its enduring importance

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    What is Typical of Lyrical Ballads The group title of the set of poems written by Wordsworth and Coleridge presents an interesting starting point of analysis. The phrase ‘Lyrical Ballads’ is a paradox as the genres of ‘lyrics’ and ‘ballads’ can be defined as in opposition to each other. A ‘lyric’ is ‘a poem about feeling… addressed to the reader in a manner of private and intimate conversation’. A ‘ballad’ is ‘a narrative poem from an anonymous point of view, often relating to characters

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    of Preface to the Lyrical Ballads Keats surpasses Wordsworth in Lyrical Ballads by using a vocabulary that is his own, by writing on subjects that he understands, and through exacting the subtleties of his thoughts and feelings. Ranked, subjective comparisons of poets are both painful to read and to write, but given criteria, one can evaluate to what extent a poet, or a poem, succeeds. In this case, Wordsworth sets up criteria for poetry in the "Preface" to his Lyrical Ballads. Through the lens of

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    Lyrical Ballads were written in a time of great change. They were dominated by the French Revolution and both Wordsworth and Coleridge felt great impact from this. There was disruption all over with the American War of Independence and other wars worldwide. Britain itself was changing rapidly due to colonial expansion, which brought new wealth, ideas and fashion, and there was much disturbance to both the people and the land with the act of enclosure, which may have meant more effective farming but

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    sub-divisions there exist points of divergence. As first generation Romantics, Coleridge and Wordsworth enjoyed an intimate friendship and collaborated to produce the seminal Romantic work, Lyrical Ballads (1798). But in his Biographia Literaria (1817) Coleridge cast a critical eye over the 'Preface to the Lyrical Ballads' (1800) and took issue with much of Wordsworth's poetical theory. Such discrepancies frustrate attempts to classify Romanticism as a monolithic movement and make establishing a workable

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    The term lyrical ballad was actually coined by Coleridge and Wordsworth as they were the first to combine the genres. Lyrical ballads are typically composed of four line stanzas and an alternating iambic rhythm of tetrameter and trimeter. In a lyrical ballad, lines one and two rhyme with lines three and four respectively; however, Coleridge does not always adhere to this pattern.

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    formatted his poetry into beautiful ballads, Whitman wrote in more relatable poems, some of which truly did not follow any form. According to William E. H. Meyer Jr., “Indeed, the very substance of Whitman 's ‘barbaric yawp,’ in contrast to Wordsworth 's ‘plaintive numbers,’ is the revolutionary and unbridgeable gap that exists between a ‘song of myself’ and a ‘prelude’ or ‘lyrical ballad.’”(Meyer 83). While Wordsworth keeps more structure and regulation in his ballads, Whitman does what feels most effective

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    relied on imagination, idealization of nature and freedom of thought and expression. Two men who influenced the era with their writings were William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, both English poets of the time. Their edition of “Lyrical Ballads';, stressed the importance of feeling and imagination. Thus in romantic Literature the code was imagination over reason, emotion over logic, and finally intuition over science. All of these new ways discouraged and didn’t tolerate the more

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