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    During the Wars of Religion, from 1554 to 1648, the actions of Elizabeth I, Henry IV, Louis XIII, and Philip II all demonstrated their worthiness to be considered great rulers. Elizabeth I of England defeated the Spanish Armada, the strongest naval power the world had ever seen. Henry IV of France took many steps that eventually led to a religious agreement in France. Louis XIII of France left France as a major European power. Philip II of Spain made Spain very rich and powerful during the height

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    Louis XIII and Louis XIV did not continue the reforms and policies of Henry IV, as they both would change France from the way Henry created it. Beginning in the late 1500’s, France was a mess; the society had been wracked by political feud and civil war. With that, peasants were overburdened with taxes and crops were failing. Places like Burgundy suffered almost complete depopulation. So as it can be seen, Henry IV entered his reign in a time of mess and need. The first things Henry IV did may include

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    Absolute Monarchy Essay

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    the Absolute Monarchy of France in the 17th Century This historical study will define the absolute monarchy as it was defied through the French government in the 17th century. The term ‘absolute” is defined I the monarchy through the absolute control over the people through the king and the royal family. All matters of civic, financial, and political governance was controlled through the king’s sole power as the monarchical ruler of the French people. In France, Louis XIII is an important example

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    Through the 15th and 18th century, Royal Absolutism was the dominant political structure in western society, and personified France and King Louis XIV. In an earlier century, Niccoló Machiavelli, wrote a document called, “The Prince.” This book was about what it takes to be a successful ruler, and the number one rule of course was: “Power is Everything.” How you acquire the power made no difference as long as you had it. Many people repulsed Machiavelli’s idea of power at all costs, but it would

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    of “great”. Akbar the Great and Louis XIV were both significant figures in the period from 1450 to 1750. Akbar the Great of India was born on October 15, 1542, in India while his father, Humayun, was in exile and became emperor at the age of 14 after his father’s death, ruling over the Mughal Empire until his own death in 1605. Furthermore, Louis XIV of France was born on September 5, 1638, to the Hapsburg Spanish Queen Anne of Austria and Louis XIII, king of France. After his father died when he

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    French Monarchy had risen to its height of absolute power and then was destroyed by the French Revolution. The reigns of Henry IV, Louis XIII, Louis XIV, Louis XV, and Louis XVI each contributed to the strengthening of the French Monarchy as well as the destruction. Class struggles were a major problem throughout the reigns of each king. France was broken into three estates that were; the clergy, the nobility, and the common people. They were each striving for more power. The

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    Throughout France in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries majority of the population consisted of peasants who lived in rural areas across an estimated thirty thousand different villages. The lives of these peasants consisted of hard physical labour that usually took place on farms that they rented from a seigneur . “Life was a struggle to grow enough to feed families and meet obligations. Crop yields were relatively low, and the average villager did not own enough land to live comfortably on

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    occupied a high post in their respective governments: Italy, England, and France; from such a vantage point, or rather in the case of Machiavelli after descending from office, each identified the ills existent in his given state and derived his own remedy for such ills. However, the efforts of Machiavelli and More proved less fruitful in the short run than did Richelieu's; while Richelieu raised the state of France under Louis XIII to a condition of greatness through the elimination of internal strife

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    Alexandre Dumas, King Louis XIII and Cardinal Richelieu are in authority in France, each struggling to gain absolute power. As a result conflicts emerge that will lead to the progress of France. France was constantly in external conflicts with England and in internal conflicts with the Huguenots that provoked war against the Catholics and even the King, but never against the Cardinal (Dumas, 1). Queen Anne’s romance to the Duke of Buckingham, who at the time was an enemy of France, was not unknown to

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    Political Testament of Cardinal Richelieu

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    the 17th century, France was a place of internal strife and bickering bureaucrats. The king, Louis XIII, had come to the throne in 1610 at the age of nine, leaving the running of the kingdom to his mother, Marie de Medici. One of her court favorites, Armand de Plessis de Richelieu, rose through the ranks, eventually gaining the title of Cardinal and becoming one of Louis’ key advisors and minister. His political manifesto, Political Testament, was a treatise for King Louis XIII that offered him

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