Free Louis stevenson Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Sean Johnson Mr. St. George British Lit 247-2 11 April 2014 The Writing Style of Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis Stevenson’s literature career took place in a prime time known as the Victorian Era. The Victorian era of British history was the period of Queen Victoria's reign from 1837 until her death in 1901. It was a long period of peace, prosperity, cleansing emotion and self-confidence for Britain. Stevenson was born November 13, 1850 in Edinburgh, Scotland, a respectable son to a middle class

    • 1091 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Robert Louis Stevenson

    • 685 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    Appearances play an important role in how Stevenson depicts characters and settings in The Strange Case of Dr .Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Hyde and everything surrounding him is described in a negative way. “Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east the line was broken by the entry of a court; and just at that point a certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street. It was two stories high; showed no window, nothing but a door on the lower storey and a blind forehead

    • 685 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Robert Louis Stevenson

    • 685 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    Robert Louis Stevenson, born November 13, 1850 in Edinburgh, Scotland and died on December 3, 1894 was a renowned Victorian author. Although he spent most of his childhood away from school due to illness, Stevenson later went on to Edinburgh University. First studying engineering, then law, Stevenson ultimately opted for a career in Literature. Stevenson has written on multitude of subjects. His stories incorporate a genuine simplicity that is appreciated by people of all ages. In his two most popular

    • 685 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Robert Louis Stevenson

    • 521 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    Actions without thoughts are a leading cause of regret within people. In both novels, Stevenson mentions the compromising situations impulsion can cause. Jekyll discloses that he has fallen victim to the temptations that surround becoming Hyde and how these temptations will only cause him pain. “I had voluntarily stripped myself of all those balancing instincts by which the worst of us continues to walk with some degree of steadiness among temptations; and in my case to be tempted, however was to

    • 521 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Robert Louis Stevenson

    • 5301 Words
    • 11 Pages

    nonfiction work of Robert Louis Stevenson along with the novels and short stories, a more complete portrait emerges of the author than that of the romantic vagabond one usually associates with his best-known fiction. The Stevenson of the nonfiction prose is a writer involved in the issues of his craft, his milieu, and his soul. Moreover, one can see the record of his maturation in critical essays, political tracts, biographies, and letters to family and friends. What Stevenson lacks, especially for the

    • 5301 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Robert Louis Stevenson- Author

    • 975 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    1850s and 1860s. This was a time when submarines were invented, the first elevator was created, and solar flares were discovered. Through all of these discoveries that changed the world, one author was starting his illustrious career. Robert Louis Stevenson is a renowned British author who has written many fictitious novels. The most notable of his works include Treasure Island, A Child’s Garden of Verses, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The majority of these stories contain traces

    • 975 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis Stevenson is one of the greatest authors to hail from Britain. His writings have been enjoyed by countless since he masterfully wrote them down. Stevenson uses characterization, imagery, and conflict to keep his readers captivated by his works in Treasure Island, Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Kidnapped. Robert Louis Stevenson was born on November 13, 1850 in Scotland. Being the only son of a famous civil engineer, Stevenson was expected to continue

    • 2652 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Robert Louis Stevenson was born on November 13, 1850, in Edinburgh, Scotland. He developed a desire to write early in life, having no interest in the family business of lighthouse engineering. He was often abroad, usually for health reasons, and his journeys led to some of his early literary works. Publishing his first volume at the age of 28. After that Stevenson became a literary celebrity during his life when he worked on the Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and the Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr

    • 725 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Body Snatcher by Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Write a short passage in the style of this author on a topic of your choice. 'Macfarlane!' he said somewhat loudly, more like a herald than a friend. The great doctor pulled up short on the fourth step, as though the familiarity of the address surprised and somewhat shocked his dignity. 'Toddy Macfarlane!' repeated Fettes. The London man almost staggered. He stared for the swiftest of seconds at the man before him, glanced behind

    • 1446 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    portray that duality of human nature exists in society and humanity through the use of characterization and setting. Stevenson in this story uses characterization to describe that duality of human nature exists in humanity and society: “There comes an end to all things; my evil finally destroyed the balance of my soul…all men's respect, wealth...murderer.”( Stevenson 51) Stevenson uses the malaise of Schizophrenia to characterize Dr.Jekyll and his dual personality Mr. Hyde. In the above quote

    • 945 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    virtue there is a sin. Every man is a playground for demons and angels alike. Robert Louis Stevenson illustrated this dual nature of a man in his novella Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Dr. Jekyll was the embodiment of success but like any bourgeois man struggled desires that violated the strict social mores and taboos of the Victorian age (Cohen 2). Three ways in which the dual nature of man is illustrated by Stevenson are, the development Dr. Jekyll's scientific thesis, Mr. Hyde's contrasting physical

    • 705 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    nature good or evil? In almost every century someone has asked this question to try and find the answer. Each individual had a specific way of debating the matter. One specific author, Robert Louis Stevenson, described the duality of human nature in his book, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Robert Louis Stevenson lived in Victorian London in the 18th century. At this time society in Victorian London was dichotomous. There was the higher class and the lower class that was only viewed as trash. Seeing that

    • 575 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson This novella, although unapparent, is intertwined with many allegorical undertones. Stevenson uses the book to criticise Victorian society and its hypocritical existence. The most significant thematic concern of the novella is the continually revisited theme of the duality of man and the camouflaged evil that lies deep within the human race. Stevenson was writing before the period in which the great psychologist Sigmund Freud was researching

    • 1388 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jekyll’s Description. Is It A ccurate? Dr. Jekyll finally reveals himself in the Chapter 10 of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde written by Robert Louis Stevenson. Jekyll at first, happy with his appearance after trying the poison, he then regret about it and write to Mr. Utterson a letter before his suicide. In this letter, not only Stevenson has perfectly sketch the human nature between good and evil, but he also present the sophisticate thoughts of a person struggling with themselves by using

    • 741 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Louis Stevenson In the strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson makes the reader question the extent to which Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are in fact a single character. Until the end of the novel, the two personas seem nothing alike-the well-liked, respectable doctor and the hideous, depraved Hyde are almost opposite in type and personality. Stevenson uses this marked contrast to make his point: every human being contains opposite

    • 1465 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hyde in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson Stevenson presents Hyde in many different ways by describing the main character of Hyde, in an effective and detailed style, and providing a variety of language, imagery and atmosphere, which also helps to create the symbol which Hyde stands for. Stevenson explores what good and evil symbolised at that time in the Victorian society, and how this leads up to the representation of Hyde. Respectability and reputation were very important

    • 1578 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    How Robert Louis Stevenson Represent Evil in Jekyll and Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson intended this tale of The Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde to be a penny numbers story, which gave us the sense that this was a simple and cheap novel, yet, it is far more sophisticated than its audience expected. Robert Louis Stevenson's captive audience were the Victorians. They were zealots, repressed and highly moral but were living through an age of change. The book itself looks at religious,

    • 1832 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson When asked this question, the immediate answer is, yes. Robert Louis Stevenson uses the features of a conventional horror story, which were very popular at the time, but also uses the story to raise social issues and make criticisms about the hypocrisy and double standards of Victorian society, in general, and Victorian London in particular. The first aspect of horror to be noticed is that the main events of the story

    • 2252 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson Good and bad. Pure and evil. Right and wrong. Joy and despair. These are all themes Robert Louis Stevenson addresses in his novel, “The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde” Robert Louis Stevenson presents the view that no human has the capacity to be completely good or completely bad. Instead human nature is shown to exhibit both good and bad with dynamic results. Human nature encourages us to feel and experience

    • 2412 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Relevance of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson Today The novel Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was written by Robert Louis Stevenson. It was written in 1886. It was set in Victorian society in London. Stevenson was Scottish and came from a strict protestant background. The genre of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is gothic horror. Stevenson was fascinated about the theory of evolution. The theory of evolution suggests that we were once ape-like creatures, this upset many religious people.

    • 896 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays