Free Lost Horizon Essays and Papers

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    themes in lost horizon

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    sought to create, find, or at least image a paradise on earth, a place where there is peace, harmony, and a surcease from the pain that plagues our lives. On the eve of World War II, James Hilton imagined such a place in his best-selling novel, Lost Horizon. The story itself begins when an evacuation of Westerners is ordered in the midst of revolution in Baksul, India. A plane containing four passengers is hi-jacked and flown far away into the Keun-Lun Mountains of Tibet. The plane crashes and the

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    Lost Horizon

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    Hilton, James. Lost Horizon. New York: William Morrow and Company,1939. I read Lost Horizon for my book report. The main characters in this story are Conway, Mallinson, Barnard, and Miss Brinklow. Conway was a man of thirty-seven years old who didn’t have a wife or any other family. Mallinson was a young man of about twenty or so who was not married yet either. Barnard was a middle-aged man that was without a wife or family also. Miss Brinklow was a woman of around the age of fifty. This story was

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    An Analysis of Hilton's Lost Horizon

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    An Analysis of Hilton's Lost Horizon "...the horizon lifted like a curtain; time expanded and space contracted" In James Hilton's Lost Horizon, the reader is promptly enticed to trek along with Hugh Conway and the three other kidnapped passengers, Charles Mallinson, Miss Brinklow, and Henry Barnard. Hilton commences his novel by utilizing the literary technique of a frame. At a dinner meeting, friends share their insights into life, and eventually, from a neurologist, and friend of Conway, evolves

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    The Utopian Philosophy of Shangri-La in James Hilton's Lost Horizon For some people life may not be satisfactory. Life has many troubles including death, pain, and suffering. It leaves little hope. There are ways in which people can live to have a good life. This method of how a person should live is viewed differently thoughout the world. James Hilton represents this combination of ideas and cultures in the novel, Lost Horizon (1933). This novel tells the tale of four distinctively different

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    Utopia: Real Peace or Real Freedom?

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    Utopia: Real Peace or Real Freedom? James Hilton's “Lost Horizons” tells the story of a random group of characters who become stranded in a strange lamasery. Located among the Himalayan Mountains, this place called Shangri-la seems to have strange effects on anyone who resides within the valley (Zurich). These individuals, their reactions and this new utopia are the basis for a story that raises the question if given the chance, who would choose to live in a place like Shangri-la? The book

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    In the movie Lost Horizon (directed by Frank Capra), a plane crash leaves five friends/family/colleagues stranded in a mysterious land. When they begin to feel like all hope is gone, a random, amiable group of men come to their rescue and take them to the place they call home—better known as “Shangri-La”. Shangri-La seems almost too good to be true; but at the same time, it seems rather mysterious. This place changes all of the characters—some for better, some for worse—but the main character Robert

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    The Effects of Wishes

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    Dickens illustrates in his book, Great Expectations, and James Hilton presents in his novel, Lost Horizon, that life is full of surprises, and happiness is not always found in the things we think we want. The hero in each of these novels is on a quest for happiness. Pip, from Great Expectations, believes that if he were to become a gentleman he would be content with his life. On the contrary, Conway in Lost Horizon is searching for peace of mind and where he can think without disturbance. Each character’s

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    Utopia on the Horizons of Time in Lukács's The Theory of the Novel Time is a pivotal term in Georg Lukács's The Theory of the Novel for two reasons: the text's "time" describes the time of the novel (the time depicted in novels as described by Lukács), but it also bears reflexively on the chronology, or the history of literary forms, which the text itself describes. These readings are not easily separable; The Theory of the Novel must be read as a self-description, as a "theoretical novel" itself

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    Black Holes

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    prevents any light or other electromagnetic radiation from escaping. But where lies the “point of no return” at which any matter or energy is doomed to disappear from the visible universe? The black hole’s surface is known as the event horizon. Behind this horizon, the inward pull of gravity is overwhelming and no information about the black hole’s interior can escape to the outer universe. Applying the Einstein Field Equations to collapsing stars, Kurt Schwarzschild discovered the critical radius

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    Dialogue - Losing Humanity "We've lost, haven't we?" her dark eyes turned to him, not pleading, not appealing, but merely stating the undeniable truth. David's heart wrenched at the loss of innocence, and ultimately, the loss of hope, he saw in that gaze. Sera had been his source of inspiration so many times in the past that David was half-afraid that he'd used up so much of her spark himself that he'd left none for her. To see her so bitter, so hopeless like this, cut him deep. "Humanity

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    Harlem Renaissance

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    It seemed to me that the primary purpose of “The Crisis” was to motivate the “Darker Race” to rise. I focused my attention on three particular pieces from “The Crisis”, an advertisement, a section called “The Horizon” and the poem “Negro”, to prove my point. Although all of these pieces served the same purpose but their method and what they were presenting were very distinct. In the “Negro” Langston Hughes focused on the history or the past of the African American race to motive the current blacks

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    Perfect Storm

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    water, the thunderstorm sustains itself, converting moisture into sheeting rain and downdraft winds. Other thunderclouds might line up along the leading edge of a cold front into a "squall line," a towering convective engine that stretches from horizon to horizon.” (The Perfect Storm Foundation) The descriptions of fishing procedures and equipment are often confusing, they are a vital part of the plot. Which gives the reader a better insight to what these fishermen went though. Without these details

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    Moderation, defined as “the avoidance of excess or extremes, especially in one's behavior or political opinions,” is part of the tenet of Shangri-La and plays an important role in the nearby Valley of the Blue Moon. In James Hilton’s fictional novel Lost Horizon, 4 individuals known as Conway, Mallinson, Brinklow, and Barnard are kidnapped while attempting to escape a revolution. They are rescued, and brought to the secretive and uncharted lamasery known as Shangri-La, where they unlock a world of mystery

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    The Hermeneutic Conception of Culture

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    to which all meaning is context-dependent and permanently anticipated from a particular horizon, perspective or background of intelligibility. The result is a powerful critique directed against the ideal of objectivity. Gadamer shares with Heidegger the hermeneutic reflections developed in Sein und Zeit and the critique of objectivity, describing the cultural activity as an endless process of "fusions of horizons." On the one hand, this is an echo of the Heideggerian holism, namely, of the thesis that

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    Postmodernity as the Climax of Modernity: Horizons of the Cultural Future ABSTRACT: Given that any society is endowed not only with a set of institutions but also with the particular pattern of self-reflection and self-description, postmodernity should be viewed as an epoch representing the climax of modernity and its self-refutation. Parting with traditional society, modernity represents the triumph of power-knowledge, the divorce between spheres of culture, the global social relations, the

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    id that overpowers the superego in this particular case. The above excerpt was provided to make the student aware of the focus of the essay, the complete paper begins below: "...Man builds towels of the spirit from which he may survey larger horizons that those of his class, race and nation. This is a necessary human enterprise. Without it man could not come to his full estate. But it is also inevitable that these towers should be Towers of Babel, that they should pretend to reach higher than

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    Analysis of Black Holes

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    strong that nothing --not even light-- can escape. It is a place where gravity is so strong that a hole has been rent in the very fabric of space and time. Surrounding this yawning chasm is a 'horizon' in the geometry of space where time itself stands still. And inside this hole, beyond this horizon, the directions of space and time are interchanged. There are wormholes to other universes, time tunnels and time machines that would bring you back to where you started before you left. There

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    a place without time

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    a place without time From the mountains, you can see it coming. Time sits on the horizon like rain clouds, holding out. In the cities you carry it around in your pocket. Time is organized around where you have to be. You dash blindly around busy corners, always racing against it. But in the mountains, the world sits on the horizon, refusing to move. Before I ever went to the city, I used to know what that meant. Now I found myself trying to remember, waking up every morning to look at the mountains

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    The Euro

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    euro. The Euro since it's very inception has become a competitor for being one of the leading currencies in the world. Not only has the Euro lent economic stability to these countries but also it has widened new horizons and has shown these countries that, not everything is lost yet, a new day has begun with hope and brightness ahead. EURO DESIGN ----------- The European Commission (EC) was given the responsibility of developing euro symbol as part of its communications work. The three

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    Hoops Galore

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    the fact that I met an abundance of new people. Every time that I started a new recreational basketball season there were always some new kids that I had never met. Getting to know these kids was a doorway to meeting their friends and expanding my horizons socially. Along with the social benefits of participating in basketball, I found it also helped mentally. Regular participation improved my mental reaction timing. When I was playing and I saw an open lane to the basket, all those years of practice

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