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    Druids

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    DRUIDS Who were the Druids? The stereotypical image of a Druid is one of a thoughtful philosopher and magician, schooled in the lore of the traditions, and in charge of the education of the chieftains as well as those who sought to obtain knowledge considered obscure by the rest of society. They were knowers of truth, able to manipulate that truth as well as inform others of it. Druids not only influenced society religiously, they also influenced it socially i.e. they took on the parts of teachers

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    a young man who leaves established society to find and create for himself a true doctrine for bliss. Raised and trained as a Brahman in a well-established religious family, Siddhartha feels vain and incomplete. He departs from his people and their lore, peacefully searching for his own dogma, what Hesse refers to as "The Self". "Siddhartha embarks on a journey of self-discovery that takes him through a period of asceticism and self denial followed by one of sensual indulgence ("Siddhartha" 255)."

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    The Use of Folklore in Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native Folklore is the study of culture, customs and beliefs based on the tradition of a society. In Victorian England an interest in folklore emerged with the official creation of The Folk-Lore Society, which published a journal and held meetings and lectures regularly. Although Thomas Hardy included folklore in his writing, there is no evidence of his affiliation with this society. Thomas Hardy's preoccupation with folklore came from

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    A Few Greek Gods

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    explained nature, set up a moral code for the people, and were just folk lore of the people. In this paper, the beginnings of myths, the Greek gods themselves, and several myths concerning morals, nature, and old lore of the Ancients will be discussed. Because the myths and details about the gods were passed along by word of mouth, some myths or gods might be interchanged or different. The Greek myths started as folk lore until it began to explain nature and storytellers integrated a moral code

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    Analysis: di Nardo, “Adoration of the Magi” The painting “Adoration of the Magi” by di Nardo portrays the three Magi approaching the baby Jesus and the Virgin Mary. However, there is much more to it than just this familiar scene from Judeo-Christian lore. When approaching this painting in order to analyze it iconographically, it is necessary to first look at all aspects of the form. If this aspect is ignored, it provides for an incomplete analysis of the painting. Once this is looked at, the iconography

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    was featured, the formalization of speech became possible through writing. More important, perhaps, the knowledge produced was easily applied to both media. Indeed, there probably was a hidden bias toward what would work that way, and certainly the lore that proved most transmissible was that which was not limited to oral speech alone. Likewise, the next major transformation in communicative technologies--printing--was accompanied by the rise of the modern linguistic sciences. As writing became printing

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    vagueness of the definition, many interpret wisdom as the accumulation of knowledge. In Greek mythology, the goddess Athena was known for her wisdom. Additionally, the personification of animals as possessing wisdom also heavily influenced Greek lore. Owls, for example, are synonymous with wisdom; likewise, foxes, with their cunning nature and ability to outsmart their prey, are considered insightful animals. Age plays a prominent part in the accumulation of learning. In many societies the elderly

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    interpreter of the oracles of nature” (110) Jim steps boldly towards manhood. Jim’s evolution is a result of Twain’s “spiritual maturity.” Mark Twain falsely characterizes superstition as an African faith but, Daniel Hoffman explains that most folk lore in Huckleberry derives from European heritage. Tying your hair into knots with thread to defend against witches who ride their prey is even referenced in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Mr. Hoffman then goes on to ask and answer “Why, then does Mark

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    Aboriginal Beliefs

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    tribe and all it contained. It was a period when patterns of living were established and laws were laid down for human beings to follow. The Dreamtime is linked with many aspects of Aboriginal practise, including rituals, storytelling and Aboriginal lore, and explains the origin of the universe, the workings of nature and the nature of humanity, and the cycle of life and death. It shapes and structures Aboriginal life by controlling kinship, ceremonial life, and the relationship between males and females

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    feeling and a sense of sharing the same feelings with the boy However, the setting is not always described from the perspective of the young boy. Malouf also describes it from the perspective of an adult. Each house has its own topography, its own lore; negotiable borders...the salient features. By making the house have a topography and changing the perspective of the description, Malouf has created a sense of mystery and adventure in discovering the rooms for the first time from a child’s point

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