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    Willy Loman Family

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    Family influences all aspects of one’s life, including, but not limited to, behavior, personality, values, and beliefs, and this holds true when analyzing Willy Loman from the play Death of a Salesman. Both Willy’s past family life and his present family lead him down certain paths that ultimately end in failure. Despite the fact that some believe Willy’s failure stemmed from his inability to be satisfied, what predominantly influenced him were his deep ties between his family and self worth. Like

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    describes a family that exemplifies a failure of the 1940s. The Loman family ultimately falls to pieces after it is evident they cannot handle the pressure in their lives. As the Lomans continue to live their life readers see the root of their issues. Some readers say that their downfall is a result of their insecurities. Strain put on the Loman family leads to their demise; this pressure stems from high expectations, unhealthy relationships, and from societal norms. The Loman family is unable to

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    we follow Willy Loman, the protagonist, as he reviews a life of desperate pursuit of a dream of success. Miller uses many characters to contrast the difference between success and failure within the play. Willy is a salesman whose imagination is much greater than his sales ability; he is also a failure as a father and husband. Biff and Happy are his two adult sons, who follow in their father's fallacy of life, while Ben and his father are the only members of the Loman family with that special

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    deserve. Other times we do not appreciate the "little things" that our loved ones do for us until it is too late. Usually these little things impact us the most. In this play, I think the "unsung hero" is no doubt Willy Loman, an aging salesman, father, and husband to the Loman Family. For example in the play, Willy is getting old and his success in business is suddenly declining. His salary was even taken away, leaving him to depend only on commission. Because of this, his two sons Biff and Happy,

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    Reality and Illusion in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman In Arthur Miller’s play, Death of a Salesman, a major theme and source of conflict is the Loman family’s inability to distinguish between reality and illusion.  This is particularly evident in the father, Willy Loman.  Willy has created a fantasy world of himself and his family.  In this world, he and his sons are men of greatness that “have what it takes” to make it in the business environment.  In reality, none of them can achieve

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    for many people. There are also many conflicts within the family; related to each characters definition of success. Willy Loman also wants his children to have a better than he has and tries to do everything he can so they will have a better life, including ending his own. One realistic situation that many people can relate to is money problems. Money is one of the main problems that Willy Loman had throughout the play. The Loman family had many purchases on payments. Linda even states “for the

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    The Midlife Crises in Death of a Salesman, Alfred J. Prufrock, and American Beauty Disillusioned and disenchanted, both Arthur Miller's Willy Loman and American Beauty's Lester Burnham share sexual frustrations and a dissatisfied longing for their respective pasts, but Willy, like T.S. Eliot's equivocating Prufrock, is unable to move beyond the failures inherent in his mediocrity and instead retreats into his delusions. On the surface, Willy and Lester have all the elements of settled

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    Death of Salesman

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    Willy’s Idea of Success is Misguided Willy Loman, the main character in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, is idealistic, stubborn and has a false sense of importance. He exhibits skewed perceptions of society that have a negative impact on him and his family. Willy believes that his philosophy of life is one that will guarantee himself and his family a life of wealth and success. Willy cannot achieve this success because his perceptions and methods to obtain it are wrong. Willy thinks that a

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    are not of noble birth nor possess a heroic nature nor experience a reversal of fortune, many of the elements in "Death of A Salesman" fulfill the criteria of a classic tragedy. The downfall and crisis points in the play are directly linked to the Loman family's combined harmartias, or personal flaws. The Loman's have unrealistic ideas regarding the meaning of success. To Willy, the foundation of success is not education or hard work, but rather "who you know and the smile on your face." Moreover

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    Importance of Self-Image in the Loman Family

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    The play depicts America as the land of opportunity as well as a place where the society has acquired a new set of values that threatens to destroy those who cannot abide by new changes. This paper discusses the importance of self-image in the Loman family and how the conceptions of self-image fuel the destruction of the characters. To begin with, the plot structure of the play does not follow a logical sense of development; rather the progression has an aesthetic appeal, which is similar to the

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    Willy Loman's Distorted Values in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman Willy Loman, the central character in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, is a man whose fall from the top of the capitalistic totem pole results in a resounding crash, both literally and metaphorically. As a man immersed in the memories of the past and controlled by his fears of the future, Willy Loman views himself as a victim of bad luck, bearing little blame for his interminable pitfalls. However, it was not an ill-fated

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    My Life according to me

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    My Life According to Me My name is Biff Loman. I had a very confusing life, now that I look back upon it. My mother, Linda was a very loving and caring person. And I have a brother, Happy also; he is a very entertaining guy. But then we have my father, Willy. Willy always had these preconceived notions about how I was going to live my life, and how I was going to be one day. I used to try and try to work at different organizations, but Willy had already poisoned my mind, by basically telling me

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    Willy Loman's Lack of Morality in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman In Arthur Miller's play, Death of a Salesman, a major theme and source of conflict is the Loman family's lack of morality.  This is particularly evident in the father, Willy Loman.  Willy has created a world of questionable morality for himself and his family.  In this world, he and his sons are men of greatness that "have what it takes" to make it in the competitive world of business.  In reality, Willy’s son Biff is a drifter

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    The Character of Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman Willy Loman, the main character in Death of a Salesman is a complex tragic character.  He is a man struggling to hold onto the little dignity he has left in a changing society.  While society may have caused some of his misfortune, Willy must be held responsible for his poor judgment, disloyalty and foolish pride. Willy Loman is a firm believer in the "American Dream:" the notion that any man can rise from humble beginnings

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    The Influence of the American Dream on Willy Loman's Life Works Cited Missing Arthur Miller was born on October 17, 1915. He began to write at a very early age and soon after graduating he began to receive recognition as an established and reputable playwright. Many of Miller's plays are based upon the dark nature of contemporary American Society and many critics regard 'Death of a Salesman' as the perfect quintessence of the modern American drama; it encompasses all the characteristics of

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    Willy Loman, An Idiot with A Dream in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman A common idea presented in literature is the issue of the freedom of the individual in opposition to the controlling pressures of society. Willy Loman, the main character in Death of A Salesman by Arthur Miller, epitomizes this type of person; one who looks to his peers and co-salesman as lesser individuals. Not only was he competitive and overbearing, but Willy Loman sought after an ideal that he could never become:

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    Willy Loman as Tragic Hero in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman The business world of today isn't all `peaches and cream'. The harsh reality of the business world is people are mostly interested in one thing, money. This reoccurring trait we have seen has plagued the business world for a millennia. As seen in the play Death of a Salesman, Willy Loman, the main-character, falls victim to this evil trait. Willy always a hard-worker was fired for his lack of profit for the company he worked

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    Miller wrote many additional plays, but is best known for Death of a Salesman. Arthur Miller was born in Harlem, New York on October 17, 1915 (“Blooms Notes” 8). Miller and his family lived in upscale Harlem for the first fourteen years of his life (8). Then after a terrible stock market crash that affected the family heavily, they moved to Brooklyn, New York (8). He attended the University of Michigan where he studied playwriting (8). Besides writing plays he wrote radio scripts, and worked as

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    Willy Loman's American Dream in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman Death of a Salesman is the story of Willy Loman, a middle-class salesman who, in the course of a single day, comes to realize that the American Dream, which he has pursued for 40 years, has failed him. Willy's relentless, but naive pursuit of success has not only affected his sense of his own worth but has dominated the lives of his wife Linda and his sons Biff and Happy. In the course of the play he realizes his true position

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    ruining the false reality he had created for himself and his family. Throughout the play, Willy Loman uses the concept of being well liked to build a false image of reality, as shown through his teachings to his son, what he considers successful, and his reasoning for committing suicide. Willy teaches Biff the concept of being well-liked, reinforcing his own belief in the ideology and furthering his false sense of reality. "Willy Loman subscribes to this view and has taught his sons to believe not

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