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    Flatland and Little House on the Prairie Simplicity clashes with stress. Living with the bare necessities, the working class families keep themselves happy. The husband works while the wife cooks the meals and takes care of the children. No desire for excessive amounts of m oney exists, just a desire for a strong bond within the family. Upper-class families or families striving for success invite stress into their lives. Too much stress from greedy desires of power creates tension in homes

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    The Banning Of Little House On The Prairie

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    "The Banning of Little House on the Prairie" Objections to Little House on the Prairie arose in the mid 1990's. Until then, the book, as well as the rest of the series, was highly praised for children of all ages. In fact, Laura was such a highly praised author that a book award was named in her honor, The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award. It was established in 1954 by the American Library Association and was first presented to Mrs. Wilder herself for the Little House on the Prairie series. It is now presented

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    The central themes of the prairie and westwards migration in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie is presented through the perspective of a young girl, Laura, as she navigates her way through the unknown dangers of the environment. This perspective is illuminated through Laura’s vision of the prairie as a mythical and mysterious place where she must abandon the comforts she has always known to adapt to the demands of prairie life. As she uncovers the enigmatic prairie and westward

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    Gender Roles in Little House on the Prairie

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    Building an Empire through Gender Roles in Little House on the Prairie Children’s literature of the Nineteenth Century is notoriously known for its projection of expected Victorian gender roles upon its young readers. Male and female characters were often given specific duties, reactions, and characteristics that reflected society’s particular attitudes and moral beliefs onto the upcoming citizens of the empire. These embedded concepts helped to encourage nationality and guide children towards

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    Narrative Style of Little House on The Prairie When you first start reading Little House on the Prairie you notice it is told through the eyes of a little girl named Laura. Her point of view is very realistic and captivating. She pays very close attention to the details of the day to day living and the events that are happening around her. She also notices how the prairie looks and what the weather is like each day. With her descriptions you can picture everything in your mind clearly, and

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    Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House Books

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    Comparing Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House Books and the Television Series Little House on the Prairie The themes of Laura Ingalls Wilder's books are repeated in the television series Little House on the Prairie. Specific events in the television series aren't the same and don't happen in the same order as in the books. Big events, such as when the family moves, happen in both and are at similar times. The Ingalls family of Pa, Ma, Mary, Laura, and Carrie is the same in both. Themes of

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    Comparing Little House on the Prairie, written by Laura Ingalls Wilder, and Sarah Plain and Tall, Written by Patricia MacLachlan Little House on the Prairie, written by Laura Ingalls Wilder, bears some resemblance to Sarah Plain and Tall, written by Patricia MacLachlan. Within both of the texts one can find two families that are adjusting to life out on the Prairie. Even though the books are written some fifty years apart they still portray the aspects of living on the prairies in the Midwest

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    Little White House

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    As you walk up to the Little White House, one can only think that how can an important man like Franklin D. Roosevelt have built such a simple yet beautiful house. With its plain white paint and clapboard shuttered windows, it’s hard to believe that some of the most important legislative decisions to Georgia and the United States as a whole could have been thought out and planned here. As you enter the house and see the simplicity of it, you also wonder why FDR choose Georgia to do it. The vacation

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    Leo and Amber turn on their flashlights revealing a dank interior with two windows and a couple scattered wooden planks. The crunch of shattered glass echoes as Amber rushes toward the pick up truck. She opens up the door and jumps in the cab. She turns the ignition, and to her disappointment nothing happens. She gets out, pops the hood, and examines the engine with her flashlight. Leo gazes at Eve who is crouched beside the window with a 9mm in her hand. "Hey kid do you know how to use a gun

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    "bush ballads" and stories, "The Drover's Wife" being one of them. This short-story has the Australian bush or outback as its setting. This is revealed in the two first paragraphs, where the author makes a short and precise description of the little house and the surrounding landscape. To tell the time of the story is, however, more difficult. The text gives us only a few clues to when it might have happened. The most obvious one is, "The drought of 18 - ruined him". First I thought that 18 meant

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