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    To define genre is to embark on a conjectural journey within a theoretical minefield. Genre theory has drawn immense debate and contemplation throughout literary history, however, several conclusions have emerged. Genre types are unfixed categories whose characteristics differ considerably among the specific genres; furthermore, the role of literary history plays a significant role in discussions of genre, for genre types evolve and shift with each new literary text. An approach to the discussion

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    Magical Realism; Natural and Fantastical

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    events” (“Magic”). Magical realism as a literary technique encompasses all literary documents that weave any supernatural elements into the natural world, has integrated itself into many modern texts, and has close cousins in the literary genre universe. For most people, the first thing that comes to mind when a person says “magic” is a group of persons with wands conjuring all sorts of fanciful images from thin air. Similarly, magical realism is a literary technique that combines a “…rational view

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    The captivity narrative genre is not often a favorite type of literature among most students. Perhaps because of the time in which they were written, students have trouble relating to characters whom lived in a setting more than two and three hundred years ago. Although the genre receives attention in many early level American literature college courses, high school English teachers rarely—if at all—teach captivity narratives. When it is used, students perceive the captivity narrative as a historical

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    Times, Eliot Fremont-Smith discusses the squabbles that occurred in the literary world over Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, squabbles that continue today. He wrote of Capote, "The author is now concerned that In Cold Blood be taken as an example of a new literary form, 'the non-fiction novel'"(8). The debate of what constitutes a novel and what constitutes non-fiction. Fremont-Smith argues that the mixing of the two genres is irrelevant: It is too bad, because this fine work raises questions

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    reputation amongst Romantic writers and readers, creating a ground-breaking genre that would remain popular within entertainment today. These literary elements, alongside the turning of a literary age and the unofficial fight for recognition between the Romantic and Gothic writers, were the key turning points that would maintain the Gothic’s literary form within history. By reviewing Walpole’s work, it can be seen where the Gothic genre was born and what elements from this writing has trickled down to the

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    Flowers from the Storm

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    plain, young woman and a misunderstood hero, who come together to develop a lasting romance. Charlotte Bronte first published Jane Eyre in 1847, under the pseudonym Currer Bell, a novel which has since become a success by earning its way into the literary canon. Bronte was born in 1816 in Yorkshire England and studied at the Clergy Daughters' School. After leaving school she became ever more interested in writing and reading Byron, after whom she later fashioned Rochester. Joyce Carol Oates relays

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    The dogs got to the gate; it was hard for them to open the door; the bolts were very high. (209) By making the reader hesitate (Todorov) about whether this is supernatural or real, this story could be placed into the Fantastic genre, but we can't put it into this genre because it also has an element of the Sublime in it. The Magical Realist technique that the author uses is the closeness or near merging (Faris) two different days. This becomes apparent when the narrator states that it was "a

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    The Metamorphosis

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    Literature. Princeton, N. J: Princeton UP, 1976 The Metamorphosis. By Kafka, Franz. Summary. 31 Jan 2001.< http://mchip00.med.nyu.edu/lit-med-db/webdocs/webdescrips/kafka98-des-html.> Todorov, Tzvetan. The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary Form. Cleveland: The Press of Case Western Reserve University, 1973.

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    Community. Ed. Lois Parkinson Zamora and Wendy B. Faris.Durham, N.C.: Duke UP, 1995. 125-144. Hodges, Margaret. Saint George and the Dragon. Boston, M.A.: Little Brown and Company, 1984. Todorov, Tzvetan. The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary From. Cleveland: The Press of Case Western Reserve University, 1973. 168-174.

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    German art critic, used the term to describe a new post-expressionistic form that was emerging. Essentially the art described as "magic realism" was realist but was simultaneously possessed of a strange or dreamlike quality. If one were to seek a literary analog - although it is probably better if one did not - the paintings were a non-verbal equivalent of defamiliarization. Essentially, the magic was derived from the painting technique employed by the associated artists rather than the actual content

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    Magical Elements in The Day We Were Dogs

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    Day We Were Dogs" has too many magical elements that are treated as normal not to be magical realism. However, I also felt that the story has some unreal elements that are not treated as normal. Therefore, I feel that the story may also fit into the genre of fantastic literature, which creates questions about the unreal elements. Given this fact that the story hovers between magical realism and fantastic literature, it can not be absolutely defined as an example of magical realism. After reading

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    Within William Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, many familiar medieval literary genres may be found. A very common tale that Chaucer uses is the fabliau, which is best portrayed in "The Miller's Tale." Another comedic genre, the beast fable, creates a moral through the use of animals instead of humans. In the Nun's Priest's Tale, Chaucer uses this fable to great effect. A third type of tale, the Breton lays, uses "The Franklin's Tale" to bring out the nobility of love. All three of these tales bring

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    Growing as a Reader

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    was just a story full of random events and nonsense, but after my realization of a deeper meaning, I grew to appreciate his efforts. From then on from Beowulf to the Fairie Queene, I have learned to see literary works as more than just stories but a... ... middle of paper ... ...y literary work looking for hidden or masked messages. I did not approach Alice in Wonderland like this, and I missed almost all of the masked messages. As I went through Beowulf, I began to look for these as I read

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    Semiotics: A Literary Genre Universal

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    of not only a plea for ceasefire but also an abject surrender. A purr from a cat, a growl of a wild beast and a long cry from a neonatal cow respectively indicating of inimicality, impending attack and a despondency to see her calf. But in various genres of literature such as prose, poetry and drama, any statement may be impregnated with an image or symbol or a cue to convey an idea not perceptible in a cursory reading. Understanding the allegorical or a sotto voce statement involves the efficiency

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    Nineteenth Century Sensational Fiction: Dime Novels In the late nineteenth century, a new form of sensational fiction emerged.  Called dime novels because of the five to twenty-five cent sale price, these pocket-sized books told short stories of American frontier adventure.  Often formulaic, these stories centered on macho heroes and damsels in distress, never venturing far beyond plotlines of capture and rescue, pursuit and escape.  Violence and lewdness became the impetus for the popularity

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    Throughout history, literature has been inspired from the culture of the time while staying true to the literary devices used in classical novels. Native Americans also used literary devices without knowledge of European usage across the Atlantic. In their literature, the Huron tribe demonstrated the use of the literary devices analogies and exaggeration while also being influenced by their culture and society. In both the standard creation myth of the Huron natives and the story of “Skunny-Wundy

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    characters and literary devices that the author may use. It creates emotion and depicts the situation. This book in particular, Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller uses a variety of literary devices to portray an intense feeling of betrayal, failure, delusion. Literary devices such as irony, symbolism, and metaphors. These three types of devices were very prevalent throughout the play and the main components in creating a significant piece of literature. One of the three main literary devices used

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    The Symbol of Sin Literary works have many literary devices in them and can include examples like themes, tones, plots, and symbols. Symbols specifically are a literary device that are very prominent in literary works and provide great meaning to the work. Symbolism can include objects, actions, or people in a story and they represent ideas that the author is trying to convey. In “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, the birthmark is a symbol that represents sin in life and the fact that no matter

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    The Misidentification of The Day We Were Dogs "The Day We Were Dogs," published in 1993 by Elena Garro, illustrates the common error of misidentification of Magical Realism. The fact that Garro is a Mexican author and that fantasy is so closely related to Magical Realism often causes the reader to associate this particular work with Magical Realism. However, this work also contains fantastic elements as well as sublime characteristics, which make it difficult to classify as a strictly Magical

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    Fantastic Elements in The Porcelain Doll

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    119-123. Roh, Franz. "Magic Realism: Post-Expressionism." Magical Realism. Theory, History, Community. Ed. Lois Parkinson Zamora and Wendy B. Faris. Durham, N.C.: Duke UP, 1995. 15-30. Todorov, Tsvetan. The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary Form. Cleveland: The Press of Case Western Reserve University, 1973. 168-174. Tolstoy, Leo. "The Porcelain Doll." Magical Realist Fiction: American Anthology. Ed. David Young and Keith Holloman. N.Y.: Longman, 1984. 33-36.

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