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    Beowulf  - A Literary Epic There are ten basic elements that help to classify a poem as an epic. Although Beowulf does not contain all of these elements, it has enough of them to still identify it as an epic. There are ten characteristics of an epic: the central character has heroic or superhuman qualities, the action takes place on an immense scale, the action involves the fate of an entire population or the whole human race, gods or semi-divine creatures aid one side or the other, the author

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    The Literary Elements of the Epic of Gilgamesh The Epic of Gilgamesh does not have a credited author, but it is considered to be one of the oldest literary works of man. This story is made up of fragments and the oldest fragments have been dated from around 2000 B.C. The Epic of Gilgamesh takes place in the ancient Middle East. This epic begins with Gilgamesh, the heroic and ambitious king of Uruk, sobbing over the death of his brotherly friend Enkidu, who was raised among wild beasts. Now fearful

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    Beowulf: An Epic Literary Work

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    Beowulf is arguably one of the most riveting, and influential epic poems in Anglo-Saxon history. The author of this epic is still unknown as is the exact date that it was written though historians predict that it was written somewhere in between the 8th and 11th Centuries. The story is set in Scandinavia and is about a Geatish hero named Beowulf and his epics and heroics. It is a poem that follows Beowulf through his life as he comes to the aid of the king of Danes and at a relatively young age slays

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    The Epic of Gilgamesh, the first recorded story, follows Gilgamesh as he struggles to deal with mortality, loss, and his limitations as a human. As these ideas develop through the death of Gilgamesh’s friend Enkidu, a central theme around mortality emerges, refines, and develops. During Gilgamesh, readers are shown that one’s acceptance of mortality is important for recovering from a loss, and for accepting the limitations you have as a human. At the beginning of Gilgamesh, the theme of acceptance

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    Although The Epic of Gilgamesh was written nearly four millennia ago, its principle values – namely in relationships – can be seen in many contemporary works, such as the American sitcom, Brooklyn Nine-Nine. Albeit the respective mediums of the works are vastly distinct, there are three main themes that can be traced throughout each of these works. The first theme is found in a seemingly tense, yet somehow lovingly personal, relationship between the main character and an authority figure. The second

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    Great Literary Epics of the Past The Roman conquest of England in 43 AD, coinciding with the introduction of Christian values, the alphabet and writing utensils was the start of a new Era. Missionaries sent by the Roman Pope to England influenced the pagan values of the native Britanie, as exemplified in their literature. Anglo-Saxons, whom contributed the features of a literary Epic, were torn between pagan beliefs and Christian values as their predecessors had been. The first literary Epic, Beowulf

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    Summary: The Babylonian Creation Epic is a poem demonstrating the concepts and struggles of mixed cultures between various gods. This poem was assumed to have been created between the twelfth and eighteenth century B.C.E. The story reveals, Tiamat, the “Primeval female sea monster” and her tempting appeal towards others, although she is always in conflict with, fresh water, Apsu. Marduk is the chief god whose temple is not only religious, but also the political center of the world. The poem starts

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    not until the late 8th century BC that their literature was first written down. Greek literature began in Ionia with the brilliant epics of Homer, the Iliad and the Odyssey. These mature products of a long tradition of oral poetry brought together a vast body of divine and heroic myths and sagas that served as a foundation for much subsequent Greek literature. The epic view of humankind had a lasting influence on Greek thought; indeed, it has been said that later Greek literature is but a series of

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    Greek and Roman Literature

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    Roman literature such as epic and lyric poetry, rhetoric, history, comic drama and satire (the last genre being the only literary form that the Romans invented) serve as today’s backbone for a basic understanding of expression and artistic creativity, as well as history. Greek comedies such as those of Naevius and Andronicus, as well as historical writings in epic poems (First Punic War), tell the story of Rome and its conquests and served as prototypes for Aroman epics. Later poets imitated early

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    Middle Age Entertainers

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    passed from person to person through entertainment. In the third century B.C., Buddhist monks tried to win converts outside India through the use of theater and song (Burdick 97). They taught the precepts of Siddhartha and Buddha in such theatrical epics as Ramayana and Mahabharata, setting exacting rules for theater performance in the process (Burdick 99). Similarly, Irish monks established singing schools, which taught uniform use of music throughout the church (Young 31). Through chants which were

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