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    Phantom Limbs

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    Phantom Limbs Phantom Limb Pain (PLP) is a serious condition that occurs when a person who has lost a part of their body though amputation, trauma (brachial plexus), or loss of nervous connections in an appendage, perceives that the limb is still there and experiences sensations coming from this area. It was first described in 1866 by S. Weir Mitchell, an American neurologist, through a short story published in Atlantic Monthly. While Mitchell may then have wondered if this was specific to wounded

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    Almost all patients who have lost a limb due to an organ amputation, paralysis, or were born with inherited birth deficiency would undergo a mysterious phenomenon called phantom limb. Within this syndrome, patients would have a perception of their missing limb and would receive sensations from it. Limb loss could be due to many factors, such as congenital deficiencies, spinal cord injuries, and amputation of a limb. Although phantom limb sensation and phantom limb pain are strongly correlated, they

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    Describing Phantom Limb Experience

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    Describing Phantom Limb Experience Of people who have had body parts amputated, about 80 percent experience some sort of phantom limb sensation. This experience, which can range from severe shooting pain to merely feeling the presence of the absent limb, most often occurs in amputees but sometimes manifests itself in individuals whose limbs have been missing since birth. The sensations patients experience are not necessarily of the same strength, location, or duration from occurrence to occurrence

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    The Experience of Phantom Limbs

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    A phantom is a persistent image or memory of a body part, generally a limb, for a period of time after its loss that can last months, even years. Silas Weir Mitchell studied this phenomenon during the Civil War. For amputees, phantom limbs are essential to regaining use of limbs following prosthetic procedures, without this sensation the recovery and reanimation of limbs can be disastrous. Positional phantoms, a type of phantom that leads to proprioceptive illusions and ever changing distorted images

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    The Invention of Prosthetic Limbs

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    Since the invention of Prosthetic Limbs, many people are able to re-cooperate through their life again. People with artificial replacements are given hope and a second chance by allowing them to use their new prosthetic body part at life. The main goal of rehabilitation with prosthetic limbs is the successful fitting and use of the artificial limb. With a prosthetic limb people will be able to improve their independence and not rely on others for care since they will be able to move or grab objects

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    Prosthetic Limbs History

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    who are in need to replace a limb due to being malformed, congenitally missing or trauma. Things are constantly changing right in front of us throughout time, the scientist is always trying new things to help others by changing prosthetics forever. For most of human history prosthetic limbs were a piece of wood or metal roughly shaped like a hand or leg. Even through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries prosthetics were mainly designed to look like our natural limbs, but they are not actually functioning

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    Limb Transplants -- Modern Miracle or Future Frankenstein? We all know that transplants save lives. Liver, heart, renal, and other organ transplants are hardly controversial. But what happens when transplants do not save lives? What happens when they actually endanger them? At least twenty-one hands and arms have been transplanted since 1998 (and one in 1964) (1). Sure, the cosmetic and functional value of having a new hand could seem like a miracle to those without hands or arms, but do these

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    Phantom Limbs, Phantom Pain, And The

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    Phantom Limbs, Phantom Pain, And The "I-Function" The so-called "I-function" which describes the brain's sense of self takes on interesting connotations when discussing phantom limbs and associated phantom pain. The loss of an arm or leg through amputation is not an easy experience to endure, and is even more difficult when the patient begins to feel sensations in their now missing limb. These feelings, sometimes referred to as "stump hallucination", is the subjective sensation, not arising

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    Phantom Limbs: A Neurobiological Explanation Severely injuring a digit or limb can result in unrepentant damage and amputation. However, the painful sensations experienced in regard to that limb do not necessarily cease after amputation. The concept of feeling sensations in a limb that is no longer attached to the body is referred to as feeling a "phantom limb." This phenomenon is experienced by approximately 80%-100% of all patients who have lost a limb (1), and has therefore sparked wide interest

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    Helping Phantom Limb Pain

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    Helping Phantom Limb Pain Over the years scientists have noted many complaints of a strange form of pain called phantom limb pain. This pain is strange because it is located in an appendage that no longer exists. By many of the amputees the pain is described as totally unbearable. Phantom limb pain has even driven some victims crazy. For the amputee population this is a very real problem that definitely needs to be solved. After James Peacock had his right arm amputated last December, he

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