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    The Harm of Radical Life Extension

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    “Radical [life] enhancement is a way of exiting the human species” (Agar). Radical enhancement is referring to an attempt to permanent or temporary alterations to the human body, in this case, the human life span. The social movement of supporting radical life enhancement is known as transhumanism. Within the past few years, there has been much more talk of radical life enhancement. This would mean possibly adding years to the average human life span. There is much controversy over the topic

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    fate; we all have our lives planned out, and there is a time and a place for everything. From the moment we are born to the time we die, everything happens for a reason. However, what would happen if we added life extension? In the context of this essay, life extension is the prolonging of life in which one cannot die from natural causes, where one can do things that are considered impossible in reality. However, with every good outcome there is an adverse outcome and moreover, the negative results

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    Life extension has been one of the biggest mysteries to solve throughout history, not only in America but all around the world. Throughout history, scientist tried different ways, through pills and injections, to master “life extension” and failed. However in recent studies, scientists have been trying to prolong the aging process so that humans can live up to an average of 150 years and with the advancement of technology, life extension has been becoming more realistic and more probable for mankind

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    The idea of extending life challenges the circle of life: we come into this world, we live, and we leave. It is not right for people to go against that law and it is completely unethical. Radical life extension poses many threats to our society and would disrupt our way of life. This idea has many disadvantages, especially to low income classes. This practice would emphasize the problems we already have with health care and treatments that prolong life and would set the gap between economic classes

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    Effects of Calorie Restriction

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    al., 2009; Sinclair, 2005). Typically a reduction of 10-40% of calorie intake is suggested by several authors as being effective in lengthening life, although a recent study using 30% dietary restriction was found to be ineffective in doing so in rhesus monkeys (Mattison et al., 2012). Several hypotheses exist to explain the mechanism behind life extension due to caloric restriction (CR). Some of the earliest theories that never gained much support include the following: McCay’s original hypothesis

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    Immortality

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    “It is death that gives urgency to life. It drives us to discovery, to cross oceans and reach into the emptiness of space” says the Herald Tribune columnist Rich Brooks (Thompson). The thought of being immortal is extremely alluring. To live in an ageless body, have all the time in the world to basically do whatever is something that every person has thought of. Immortality has always been a myth, but with technology continuing to advance everyday with alarming speed, it might soon be possible. Scientist

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    How Long Humans can Live

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    In the field of gerontology, there is no other issue which is as contentious as the question of how long humans can live. One school maintains that human life can be extended for any number of years. While the opposing school says that there is definitely an age limit beyond which human life cannot be extended. Aging is labeled as the accumulation of diverse harmful changes occurring in cells and tissues with advancement of age that are responsible for the increased risk of disease and death.

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    Essay On Cryonics

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    Scientific Contemporary Issues Report Cryonics What is Cryonics? Cryonics is a procedure whereby a person or living organism is frozen soon after death in order that it may be thawed and rejuvenated at a later date should a cure for the cause of death be found. A person or living organism that is preserved by the process of cryonics is said to be in cryonic suspension. In order to understand the true nature of cryonics it is wise to give a simple example of what scientists are attempting to achieve

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    Caloric Restriction Extends Human Lifespan

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    non-genetic mechanism that extends longevity (Mattison, et al., 2012). A study by McCay et al. in 1930 (Heilbronn & Ravussin, 2005) provided evidence that CR slows aging and extends human lifespan. Caloric restriction is applicable at any stage in the life cycle, but the goal should be to ensure consumption of a healthy diet. The physiological changes related to aging include cell damage and the appearance of cancerous cells. Low calorie diets in old age help to eliminate these cells (Spingler & Dhahbi

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    relatively minor, such as polydactyly (a trait involving an extra little finger) (Parens). As it gets easier to test for these genetic disorders, so does the perception within both the medical and broader communities that prenatal testing is a logical extension of good prenatal care. On the other hand, as long as in-utero interventions remain relatively rare, and as long as the number or people seeking prenatal genetic information to prepare for the birth of a child with a disability remains small, prospective

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