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    The Harm of Radical Life Extension

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    “Radical [life] enhancement is a way of exiting the human species” (Agar). Radical enhancement is referring to an attempt to permanent or temporary alterations to the human body, in this case, the human life span. The social movement of supporting radical life enhancement is known as transhumanism. Within the past few years, there has been much more talk of radical life enhancement. This would mean possibly adding years to the average human life span. There is much controversy over the topic

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    fate; we all have our lives planned out, and there is a time and a place for everything. From the moment we are born to the time we die, everything happens for a reason. However, what would happen if we added life extension? In the context of this essay, life extension is the prolonging of life in which one cannot die from natural causes, where one can do things that are considered impossible in reality. However, with every good outcome there is an adverse outcome and moreover, the negative results

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    Life extension has been one of the biggest mysteries to solve throughout history, not only in America but all around the world. Throughout history, scientist tried different ways, through pills and injections, to master “life extension” and failed. However in recent studies, scientists have been trying to prolong the aging process so that humans can live up to an average of 150 years and with the advancement of technology, life extension has been becoming more realistic and more probable for mankind

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    The idea of extending life challenges the circle of life: we come into this world, we live, and we leave. It is not right for people to go against that law and it is completely unethical. Radical life extension poses many threats to our society and would disrupt our way of life. This idea has many disadvantages, especially to low income classes. This practice would emphasize the problems we already have with health care and treatments that prolong life and would set the gap between economic classes

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    Effects of Calorie Restriction

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    al., 2009; Sinclair, 2005). Typically a reduction of 10-40% of calorie intake is suggested by several authors as being effective in lengthening life, although a recent study using 30% dietary restriction was found to be ineffective in doing so in rhesus monkeys (Mattison et al., 2012). Several hypotheses exist to explain the mechanism behind life extension due to caloric restriction (CR). Some of the earliest theories that never gained much support include the following: McCay’s original hypothesis

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    Immortality

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    “It is death that gives urgency to life. It drives us to discovery, to cross oceans and reach into the emptiness of space” says the Herald Tribune columnist Rich Brooks (Thompson). The thought of being immortal is extremely alluring. To live in an ageless body, have all the time in the world to basically do whatever is something that every person has thought of. Immortality has always been a myth, but with technology continuing to advance everyday with alarming speed, it might soon be possible. Scientist

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    How Long Humans can Live

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    In the field of gerontology, there is no other issue which is as contentious as the question of how long humans can live. One school maintains that human life can be extended for any number of years. While the opposing school says that there is definitely an age limit beyond which human life cannot be extended. Aging is labeled as the accumulation of diverse harmful changes occurring in cells and tissues with advancement of age that are responsible for the increased risk of disease and death.

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    Essay On Cryonics

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    Scientific Contemporary Issues Report Cryonics What is Cryonics? Cryonics is a procedure whereby a person or living organism is frozen soon after death in order that it may be thawed and rejuvenated at a later date should a cure for the cause of death be found. A person or living organism that is preserved by the process of cryonics is said to be in cryonic suspension. In order to understand the true nature of cryonics it is wise to give a simple example of what scientists are attempting to achieve

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    Caloric Restriction Extends Human Lifespan

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    non-genetic mechanism that extends longevity (Mattison, et al., 2012). A study by McCay et al. in 1930 (Heilbronn & Ravussin, 2005) provided evidence that CR slows aging and extends human lifespan. Caloric restriction is applicable at any stage in the life cycle, but the goal should be to ensure consumption of a healthy diet. The physiological changes related to aging include cell damage and the appearance of cancerous cells. Low calorie diets in old age help to eliminate these cells (Spingler & Dhahbi

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    relatively minor, such as polydactyly (a trait involving an extra little finger) (Parens). As it gets easier to test for these genetic disorders, so does the perception within both the medical and broader communities that prenatal testing is a logical extension of good prenatal care. On the other hand, as long as in-utero interventions remain relatively rare, and as long as the number or people seeking prenatal genetic information to prepare for the birth of a child with a disability remains small, prospective

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    on the part of the aged, about being taken to the hospital - where the doctor may have the last word about life and death. This essay digs into this evolutionary process of voluntary euthanasia evolving into the non-voluntary type. Advocates of legalised euthanasia almost always insist that they only want voluntary euthanasia (VE) - a they say they are as opposed to the taking of life without the subject's knowledge or consent, that is, non-voluntary euthanasia (NVE), as anyone else. Some do

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    show how the gay is related to two of the most potent archetypal images: those of Dionysos and Apollo. Secondly, to demonstrate that the Wildean gay is profoundly afraid of life, and that his interest in form and aesthetic proportion rests on a principle of "evasion." Thirdly, to contend that the humor in this novel, and by extension also in Wilde's plays, is a symptom of the author's fascination with an archetypal "gay." The Picture of Dorian Gray revolves around Dorian's dual nature. On the one

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    Lies in Heart of Darkness After declaring his passionate hate of lying it is odd to see the complete reversal of character in Marlow by the end of the book.  Then perhaps it is not a change but merely an unexpected extension of his character that gives a different dimension to his personality. His statement "You know I hate, detest, and can't bear a lie...it appalls me.  It makes me miserable and sick, like biting something rotten would do" (Longman 2210) gives what one may rightly consider

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    Cushan-rishathaim." The Hebrew word for "Spirit" is ru^ach, and the entry in Strong's Concordance for this word is as follows: From H7306; wind; by resemblance breath, that is, a sensible (or even violent) exhalation; figuratively life, anger, unsubstantiality; by extension a region of the sky; by resemblance spirit, but only of a rational being (including its expression and functions): - air, anger, blast, breath, X cool, courage, mind, X quarter, X side, spirit ([-ual]), tempest, X vain, ([whirl-])

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    Nietzsche's relationship to his country of birth. In this paper, I carry out such an investigation with a focus on the late period (the writings after Thus Spoke Zarathustra) in order to clarify Nietzsche's view of his own project regarding German (and by extension European) culture. I show that in the late period Nietzsche created a portrait of Wagner in which the composer was a worthy opponent; meaning someone with whom Nietzsche disagreed but viewed as an equal. Nietzsche himself took on several worthy opponents

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    Humanism

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    responsibility. It           advocates the extension of participatory democracy and           the expansion of the open society, standing for human           rights and social justice. Free of supernaturalism, it           recognizes human beings as a part of nature and holds           that values--be they religious, ethical, social, or           political--have their source in human experience and           culture. Humanism thus derives the goals of life from           human need and interest rather

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    Indigo

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    "Indigo did not tell her mother about Mr. Lucas being so evil, nor did she mention that her new fiddle could talk."(Norton 43) With in the first few lines of the story Indigo’s violin begins its transformation from merely and instrument to an extension of her soul. Symbolically Indigo’s violin is representative of her soul. With her violin Indigo pursues the passions of her soul as she struggles to find her place somewhere between childhood and womanhood. Indigo’s mother begs her not to play the

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    The Big Sleep: Movie vs. Novel

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    The Big Sleep: Movie vs. Novel Film and literature are two media forms that are so closely related, that we often forget there is a distinction between them. We often just view the movie as an extension of the book because most movies are based on novels or short stories. Because we are accustomed to this sequence of production, first the novel, then the motion picture, we often find ourselves making value judgments about a movie, based upon our feelings on the novel. It is this overlapping

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    Characters Hidden Values and Needs in To The Lighthouse Woolf's chosen role as an author is to uncover the hidden values and needs of her characters' psychologies, and by extension of this, those of her readers — each frequent realization of the character's is a real and vividly personal epiphany, the like of which 'real-life' persons do not have such a feel for on a day-to-day basis; the characters are in a very real sense perhaps too self-aware to be considered 'real'. (Tansley and Lily at the

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    references to both Poe and “The Fall of the House of Usher;” however, Carpenter’s analysis proves itself to be inaccurate. Carpenter repeatedly writes statements of which he claims are true, but then argues contrary points. His use of “evidence” is an extension of his self-negating arguments. Based on the inescapable presence of contradictions and “evidence” that does not support his opinion, Carpenter’s essay is an inaccurate review of “The Fall of the House of Usher.” In his essay, Carpenter writes

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