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    Ben Franklin

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    Ben Franklin Ben Franklin is one of the most dynamic figures in the history of America. As a philosopher, scientist, writer, inventor, diplomat, and more he had far reaching effects on America and the world both in his time and today. Franklin was one of the first people to recognize himself as "American" and distinguish the people of the new nation as something more than British colonists. As an American, Franklin sought to improve the country through the creation of institutions and the development

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    to... ... middle of paper ... ...d Poirier and Mark Richardson. New York: Library of America, 1995. 204. Print. Frost, Robert. "Into My Own." Collected Poems, Prose & Plays. Comp. Richard Poirier and Mark Richardson. New York: Library of America, 1995. N. pag. Print. Frost, Robert. "Neither Out Far Nor In Deep." Collected Poems, Prose & Plays. Comp. Richard Poirier and Mark Richardson. New York: Library of America, 1995. 274. Print. Frost, Robert. "Nothing Gold Can Stay." Collected Poems, Prose

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    they existed in, but is still obvious in today’s culture. Even though both men are credited for their wise principles, their beliefs do not always coincide with one another. However, one thing they do have in common is that they both revolutionized America through their thoughts, actions, and distinctive opinions on how to improve the world around them. Henry David Thoreau and Benjamin Franklin had a lot of similar ways of life. The men didn’t believe in the Christian religious conviction of the time

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    My Neighbor’s Keeper?           William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily is set in the small southern town of Jefferson during the early decades of the twentieth century . At this time, vast and cardinal changes were being made by the upcoming new south to conceal and move from the horrid truths that were a part of the town's history. In lieu of this, Jefferson was at a turning point in which they were having difficulty coming to terms with these changes . Integrating Faulkner's use of character and symbols

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    Misconceived Humorous Analysis “A sense of humor is just common sense dancing.” -William James . The two stories that I am comparing are “The Weather of New England” by Mark Twain and “The Dog that Bit People” by James Thurber. These essays are both humorous essays. In “The Weather of New England” , it talks about the different , interesting types of weather in New England. In the dog story the crazy dog bites everyone even the own family. Both these humorous essays use style, tone, and perspective

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    Natural philosophers of every century of human existence have asked what we owe to each other, society or government. In The Origin of Civil Society, Jean-Jacques Rousseau argued that the only natural form of duty is to one’s family, and all other obligations are based on agreement (57). Henry David Thoreau, in 1849, wrote in Resistance to Civil Government (sometimes known as Civil Disobedience), “it is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the

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    American authors explore the ideals of human existence through aesthetic representations of nature. William Cullen Bryant, who has been called "the father of American poetry," is one of the earliest artists to capture the essence of nature in America and apply it to the human experience. In his poem "To A Waterfowl" he uses the example of a waterfowl to reach a better understanding of human existence. In the poem, the waterfowl is portrayed as a near-perfect creation, and it is treated with

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    Heroes of American Realism The American realists of the late 19th century were notably adept at creating deep, memorable characters --whether virtuous or villainous-- who are continuously developed throughout the tales in which they exist. These authors often used their protagonists for a higher purpose than mere storytelling, endeavoring to construct a critique of the times by placing the characters in opposition to their respective societies. As a result, the protagonist often becomes an unassuming

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    Black Boy1

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    Black Boy1 Frederick Douglass and Richard Wright wrote memoirs recounting their experiences with racism. Though their writing styles are completely different from one another, the subjects they discuss are similar. After reading each piece they have both made me empathize with their feelings, however different their lives are from mine. Their memoirs, My Bondage My Freedom and Black Boy, provide insightful images of the racist and cruel treatment these writers experienced. Despite all of their

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    Richard Wright, in his novel, Native Son, favors short, simple, blunt sentences that help maintain the quick narrative pace of the novel, at least in the first two books. For example, consider the following passage: "He licked his lips; he was thirsty. He looked at his watch; it was ten past eight. He would go to the kitchen and get a drink of water and then drive the car out of the garage. " Wright's imagery is often brutal and elemental, as in his frequently repeated references

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