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    Leo Strauss

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    In 1899–1973, American philosopher, b. Hesse, Germany. Strauss fled the Nazis and came to the United States, where he taught at the Univ. of Chicago (1949–68). Strauss is known for his controversial interpretations of political philosophers, including Xenophon and Plato. Strauss wrote an influential critique of modern political philosophy, i.e., philosophy since Machiavelli, arguing that it suffers from an inability to make value judgments about political regimes, even about obviously odious ones

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    Leo Strauss and Reinhold Niebuhr

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    Leo Strauss and Reinhold Niebuhr represent two giants of twentieth century political philosophy. The Jewish classicist and Christian theologian contemporaries articulated profound thoughts on political philosophy and earned recognition for their work on the subject of international relations. Indeed, their prominence within the field of international relations continues into modern times and contemporary debates. The Bush administration’s Straussian policy and President Obama’s favoring of Niebuhrian

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    a product of the Italian Renaissance in that it attempts to explain how things really are rather than how they are perceived. WORKS  CITED Machiavelli, Niccolo.  The Prince.  Trans.  Christian E. Detmold.  New York:  Airmont, 1965. Strauss, Leo.  "Machiavelli the Immoralist."  The Prince:  A Norton Critical Edition.  New York:  W.W. Norton, 1977.  180-185.

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    Kephalos defines justice as returning what one has received (Ten Essays, Leo Strauss, page 169). On the other hand, Kaphalos’ son, Polemarchus, states that justice is found in harming one’s enemies and helping ones’ friends (Republic, 332D). The final opinion in the discussion is given by Thrasymachus as he says: “justice is nothing

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    Plato's Book I of The Republics presents three fundamental views on justice which are exemplified in Thucydides' On Justice, Power and Human Nature. Justice is illustrated as speaking the paying one's debts, helping one's friends and harming one's enemies, and the advantage of the stronger. In both their works, Plato and Thucydides write of the view that justice is honoring one's debts. In The Republics, Cephalus asserts that justice is "the truth and giving back what a man has taken from another

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    The Importance of Thrasymachus in Plato’s Republic Dr. Malters’s comments: This student does two things quite remarkable for an undergraduate student. In his compact essay, not only does he display an in-depth understanding of complex perspectives on justice put forth by the protagonist Socrates, he deftly explains how Plato has artfully made rude objections by a seemingly minor character early in the dialogue function as a structuring device for nearly all the important ideas examined thereafter

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    Plato's Vision Of The Ideal State As Presented In The Republic The concept of questioning meaning of life, the universe and everything has become debauched in modern society. But there is an exigency for and a value in the procedure of reasoning through aspects of our experience beginning with moral principles to existence. It can, for ordinary peoples as much as for professional philosophers, enlivening, vivid, and developmental. Plato is one of the most influential thinkers in human history. His

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    An Analysis of Plato's Republic

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    Explain the passage’s meaning in context. Societies hold value in the respect and virtuous abilities over others often times put justice on a pedestal and hold tight to it. In the eyes of Socrates is Plato’s Republic, Book VI he states that “In a suitable one [constitution], his [a philosopher's] own growth will be fuller and he will save the community as well as himself” (Plato “Republic”, p. 177, 497a). When you break it down this quote means when abiding by the laws held by the community each

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    Of the many important texts in our world’s history, Plato’s Republic is among the best of them. This text has been used countless times and for countless reasons. Jon Dorbolo states, “The Republic is considered by many to be Plato’s masterwork. It certainly is one of the most important texts of political theory. In the Republic, Plato reasons his way to a description of the perfect political system.” So many people used the Republic when making important political decisions and writing important

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    Cassirer, Nietzsche and Niccolò Machiavelli's The Prince When the word "Renaissance" is mentioned, an image of love for antiquity learning and fine arts usually springs to one's mind. Yet this perception, however legitimate it may be in many areas of Renaissance human achievements, shatters in the face of Niccolò Machiavelli's masterpiece The Prince. Unlike his contemporary Baldassare Castiglione who exemplified subtlety, Machiavelli was ruthlessly practical, nonchalantly callous, and admirably

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