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    Lech Walesa's Fight

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    by war just years ago in World War II. The strong nationalistic Polish people constantly dealt with burdens forced upon them by more powerful nations. The Polish people needed a strong leader to bring them independence. Lech Walesa was born as if to answer this plea. Lech Walesa was no different than any other working class man in post war Poland. He loved his family, his mother, and his country just like any other good Catholic. He however had such a patriotic gravitas that he would eventually spark

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    it started in the first place that makes it important. There was no doubt that Lech Walesa was a great man, a noble speaker, and a powerful leader. However, his life was not always bliss. Though Walesa had a gift for words, he was only fortunate enough to get a mediocre education. With the education he had, he got a job as an electrician at the Lenin Shipyard in Gdansk. When the strike started, Lech Walesa was only too eager to jump into action. He literally jumped over the shipyard wall

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    history will have his fingers crushed” -Lech Wałęsa (www.brainyquote.com). He was born the son of a simple carpenter, but much like another famous carpenter’s son, his impact upon the world was far greater than the circumstances of his birth and childhood. Though he never intended to become such an important figure on the grand stage of world history, and though he is still living, Mr. Wałęsa has already entered the pantheon of the world’s greatest leaders. Lech Wałęsa became very active in supporting his

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    crushed because communism was anti religious but they could not do so in Poland because nearly all the Poles were Catholics. The head of the Catholic Church was a pole that made an influential visit home to Poland during the height of Solidarity. Lech Walesa was the man behind all of these new and ‘capitalistic’ ideas. Throughout his working career he fought the powers that were. Having led the strikes in the Gdansk shipyard in the summer of 1980. He then eventually founded solidarity in August of 1980

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    several attempts by different countries to expel it, into Poland in 1945. Pope John Paul II and Ronald Reagan were very distinguished figures in the expulsion of Communism in Poland. The Gdańsk Agreement, the formation of the Solidarity Party, Lech Wałęsa, and the Workers' Defense Committee were major components of the beginning of the fall of Communism in Poland. The Communist government saw that the Polish people were beginning to rebel against them and took action by outlawing Solidarity, imposing

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    The Solidarity Movement

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    spread to the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk on August 14th, everything was about to change. The strikers were backed by waves of support from other industrial centers, and the Communist Party was forced to negotiate with them. Under the leadership of Lech Walesa the strikers emerged victorious and the formation of an independent trade union called Solidarity was born. To begin, one must look at why the Solidarity Movement in Poland succeeded where so many other revolutionary movements across the Eastern

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    The Fall of Communism: Poland 1980-1992

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    Communists attempted to constrain the Polish from living their way, the Solidarity Party became more unified and longed for, and the Solidarity Party won the first supposedly free election. The Gdańsk Agreement, the formation of the Solidarity Party, Lech Wałęsa, and the Workers' Defense Committee were the major components of the beginning of the fall of Communism in Poland. The Communist government saw that the Polish began to rebel against them and took action by outlawing Solidarity, imposing martial

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    The Fall of Communism in Poland

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    century despite several attempts by different countries to expel it. Pope John Paul II and Ronald Reagan were very distinguished figures in the expulsion of Communism in Poland. The Gdańsk Agreement, the formation of the Solidarity Party, Lech Wałęsa, and the Workers' Defense Committee were major components of the beginning of the fall of Communism in Poland. The Communist government saw that the Polish began to rebel against them and took action by outlawing Solidarity, imposing martial law

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    The Three Ways of the Independence of the Countries of the Pact of Warsaw: Poland If towards the United States the Soviet Unionhad a very active behavior, it cannot be said the same for that that it concerns the relationships inside the Pact of Warsaw. While for the whole postwar period, every attempt to detach from Moscow had been punished with the military intervention (Czechoslovakia 1948, Hungary 1956, still Czechoslovakia 1968), with the advent of Gorbacev and his perestrojka, there

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    The Solidarity movement in Poland The Solidarity movement in Poland was one of the most dramatic developments in Eastern Europe during the Cold War. It was not a movement that began in 1980, but rather a continuation of a working class and Polish intelligentsia movement that began in 1956, and continued in two other risings, in 1970 and 1976. The most significant of these risings began in the shipyards of the 'Triple City', Gdansk, Sopot and Gdynia in 1970. The first and by far the most violent

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