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    biblical tales of Christianity, when Jesus, the son of God, comes to resurrect a man named Lazarus. Lazarus, or Lazarus of Bethany, or in the later years after resurrection, Saint Lazarus of Bethany, is a pivotal figure in the Christian religion as well as in art culture and media. In biblical stories, Lazarus starts out as a follower of Jesus Christ and lives a city named Bethany near the city Jerusalem. Lazarus gets deadly ill and is bedridden; therefore, his two sisters, Mary and Martha travels to

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    The Struggle in Lady Lazarus Lady Lazarus repeats the struggle between Nazi and Jew which is used in Daddy, with the Nazi atrocities a background across which the amazing, self-renewing speaker strides. The speaker orchestrates every aspect of her show, attempting to undermine the power an audience would normally have over her. She controls her body, instead of being a passive object of other eyes. The speaker orders her enemy to Peel off the napkin, telling the audience that there is a charge

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    Sartre's Theories and Sylvia Plath's Poem Lady Lazarus After reading Sartre's Essays in Existentialism, I evaluated Sylvia Plath's poem "Lady Lazarus" according to my interpretation of Sartre's philosophy, then used this aesthetic impression to evaluate the efficacy of Sartre's theories as they apply toward evaluating and understanding art. If you have not read the poem in question, I suggest you go here to check it out before reading this essay. "We write our own destiny -- we become what

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    Lady Lazarus and Stings Sylvia Plath's works are known for their extremes. Much of the influence of her poems came from the males in her life that had the most effect on her; her father, Otto Plath and Ted Hughes, who she married and later it fell apart when Ted began having an affair. The effects of these men on her were mostly negative, making her poems to have loathing and suffering. Otto Plath published a book about bees early in Sylvia's life, and he kept bees, which was an n activity later

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    Rebirth in Lady Lazarus, Fever 103, Getting There, and Cut The Ariel-period poems of Sylvia Plath demonstrate her desire for rebirth, to escape the body that was "drummed into use" by men and society. I will illustrate the different types of rebirth with examples from the Ariel poems, including "Lady Lazarus," "Fever 103," "Getting There," and "Cut." "Lady Lazarus," the last of the October poems, presents Plath as the victim with her aggression turned towards "her male victimizer (33)." Lady

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    Tone in Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus" In “Lady Lazarus” by Sylvia Plath, the speaker’s tone is revealed through many different poetic aspects. Throughout her writing, the speaker’s attitude towards death appears to be happy but, when looking more closely at Plath’s use of poetic devices her attitude is bitter. Shown mainly through the diction, images, sounds and repetition, this depressing tone emphasizes the speaker’s feelings about death. First, diction or word choice used throughout this

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    Empowerment of Women in Sylvia Plath's Lady Lazarus and Eavan Boland's Anorexic Although the title foreshadows an extrinsic approach, this essay mostly features intrinsic analysis. Eavan Boland's "Anorexic" seems descendent from Sylvia Plath's "Lady Lazarus": the two share common elements, yet have significant differences. An examination of the poems' themes reveals that self-destructiveness can serve as empowerment for women. Plath explores Lady Lazarus' nontraditional view of suicide in her

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    Portrayal of Suffering in Plath's Ariel, Stings, Lady Lazarus, Wintering, and Fever 103° Sylvia Plath's poems evoke the worst of subjective fallacies. Probably some of our charged reactions are symptomatic of the times and the culture; but more of them seem to stem from the always-too-easy identification between troubled poet and what might be the tone of imagery and rhythm of the poem considered. Because Plath worked so intensively in archetypal imagery (water, air, fire as bases for image

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    repent. Raskolnikov is an example of someone who, despite lack of compassion and sound judgment, was able to achieve rebirth through religious inspiration and influential relationships. Dostoyevsky teaches his readers that, in order to be reborn like Lazarus and Raskolnikov, one must take the necessary steps of suffering and punishment to get there. Annotated Bibliography

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    The poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” written by T.S. Eliot is a depiction of sadness and a disillusioned narrator. While reading this poem, one senses that the narrator is disturbed and has maybe given up hope, and that he feels he is just an actor in a tedious drama At the very beginning of the poem, Eliot uses a quote from Dante’s “Inferno”, preparing the poem’s reader to expect a vision of hell. This device seems to ask the reader to accept that what they are about to be told by the

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    In "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," T. S. Eliot reveals the silent insecurity of a man, for whom the passing of time indicates the loss of virility and confidence. Throughout the poem, Prufrock struggles with his fear of inadequacy, which surfaces socially, physically and romantically. The desire to ask some "overwhelming question," of the one he wants is outweighed by his diffidence, reinforcing his belief in his shortcomings. Ultimately, this poem is the internal soliloquy of someone who

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    Analysis of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" J. Alfred Prufrock constantly lived in fear, in fear of life and death. T. S. Eliot divided his classic poem into three equally important sections. Each division provided the reader with insight into the mental structure of J. Alfred Prufrock. In actuality, Prufrock maintained a good heart and a worthy instinct, but he never seemed to truly exist. A false shadow hung over his existence. Prufrock never allowed himself to actually live. He had

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    indeed there will be time...yet for a hundred indecisions and for a hundred visions and revisions..."meaning that he is under the impression that he still has a chance to make his life the way it was in his dreams.  The unfinished statement  "I am Lazarus, come from the dead/ come back to tell you all, I shall tell you all-..." explains this.  Some of his dreams/"illusions of grandeur"(Solo, 104) are of the sort that contain "arms that are braceleted and white and bare..." (women) while others are

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    who feels similar to not being worthy enough to talk to a woman. He repeatedly puts himself down because of what he assumes the woman will say to him or about him if he talks to them. Prufrock compares himself to multiple people in the poem such as Lazarus, and Prince Hamlet as a way of saying his life is meaningless. In the general public today people are so judgmental about the way an individual looks, dresses, and smells. It is discriminating and it is not right, no one should ever have to be ashamed

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    Explication of T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" In T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," the author is establishing the trouble the narrator is having dealing with middle age. Prufrock(the narrator) believes that age is a burden and is deeply troubled by it.. His love of some women cannot be because he feels the prime of his life is over. His preoccupation with the passing of time characterizes the fear of aging he has. The poem deals with the aging and fears

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    “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” In modernism, fragmentation, open form, and themes of hopelessness take priority over the fixed form and meter of the previous era. It is about bold strokes and individuals whose writing style encompassed the changing world. T. S. Eliot is no exception. With his 1915 poem, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”, he uses new modernist ideals as an expression of the pessimistic feelings of society and a shift away from traditional writings. With a variety of literary

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    rich man and Lazarus, a beggar covered with boils. The rich man did not help Lazarus one bit, even though Lazarus’s condition was so bad, being covered in sores, that “even the dogs came and licked his sores” (Luke 16:21). The rich man daily “was dressed in purple and fine linen and lived in luxury every day” (Luke 16:19), but would not spare some food for Lazarus who “[longed] to eat what fell from the rich man’s table” (Luke 16:21). Eventually both Lazarus and the rich man died, Lazarus was received

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    The Woes of an Aging Poet

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    The Woes of an Aging Poet T. S. Eliot once said, "Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go." He does not have this mindset when creating his character for his poem "The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock". Prufrock is an aging bachelor longing for the love of a woman, but his timidness prevents him from uttering a word beyond his double-sided conscience. Prufrock's lack of self-confidence, disbelief in finding a moral woman, and fear of rejection shows us the internal

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    Prufrock Vs. Dante T.S. Eliot once said, “Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.”  When you become so immersed in a type of writing and types of stories you tend to reflect and talk about these works as well and this may be why both of the characters in Dante’s “Inferno” And Eliot’s “A Love Song” were so similar, yet different. The first six lines of the poem “The Love Song of J.

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    Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society. Vol. 2.2. Web. 2013. Lowe, Peter. “Shelleyan Identity in T.S. Eliot’s ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” International Publication Center. P. 65-74. Web. 1999. Campo, Carlos. “Identifying the ‘Lazarus’ in Eliot’s ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” English Language Notes. September 1994. Print. McCormick, Frankie J. “Eliot’s ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’ and Shakespear’s Hamlet.” Eastern Illinois University. P. 43-47. Print.

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