Free Laurence Sterne Essays and Papers

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    Words and names play a powerful role in Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. In Volumes I, II, and IV, language and the effect words have on the story create an important theme, which connects the three books together. Digressions inside these books build on each other. This allows Sterne to draw the reader’s attention to the problems words create, as well as the importance of original phrasing. Names and word choice, as well as the power they possess, fill these Volumes, through Tristram’s baptism

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    father managed his affliction...indeed differently from most men either ancient or modern; for he neither wept it away...or slept it off...or hang'd it, or drowned it, nor did he curse it, or damn it, or excommunicate it...He got rid of it however" (Sterne 290). He is overcome with grief and the only way he can be rid of the pain he feels is by quoting the wisdom of death as told by many philosophers. Never once is there any mention of him shedding a single tear over the death of his son. Another

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    robert frost

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    Moraru Teodora-Bianca IIIrd year, German-English gr. I. The Psychological Origins and the Effects of the Hobbyhorse in Laurence Sterne’s “Tristram Shandy” Defying Dr. Samuel Johnson’s statement that “Nothing odd will do long”, Laurence Sterne’s eccentric masterpiece, “The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman”, an extended act of meditation upon story-telling based on John Locke’s philosophical theory of the association of ideas, became a notable forerunner of the modern English novel

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    the novel itself includes very minor detail of the protagonist’s recollected life and instead he draws more focus upon the events involving the supporting characters of the novel, and instead surrounding his earlier childhood. These, however, allow Sterne to identify the early developments of Tristram’s individual identity through hereditary and social influences upon his personality. The protagonist begins his novel by presenting the notion that it was his parent’s actions, as he formed as a homunculus

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    understandings, will not only be very pleasant, but bring us great advantage, in directing our thoughts in the search of other things.” (Locke 2). The process of this understanding is entwined in the novel, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, by Laurence Sterne. In the novel, a man recounts his life whilst deferring to seemingly insignificant tales of the people in it. Although the narrator has claimed the work to be a biography, he does not speak ofte... ... middle of paper ... ...tellect is,—that

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    Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy

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    Highlighting the reader as a character in Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy may seem trivial considering the clear use of fictional readers within the text ("sir", "madam", "lord", et al.); however, the manner in which Stern renders the reader a character, and creates the illusion of in-text participation, is far more profound than sporadic discourse with these aforementioned sirs and madams. This essay, through analysis of Volumes 1 and 2 of Tristram Shandy (with latter volumes in mind), seeks to

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    Laurence Sternes’ “Tristam Shandy”, specifically volume 1 ch: 12, holds patronage to sentimentality through a compilation of juxtaposing emotions that are exchanged between the two characters Yorick, and Eugenius. This exchange moving towards the climatic moment in the chapter where Parson Yorick’s is murdered by the ambiguous debtors who desired revenge for his sallies. However, the chapter in entirety is expressed in a particular manner. Since the time-span of the chapter itself is short, and spontaneous

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    reason," where the verb "conquered" is understood to also govern the final two phrases in the sentence (Crowley 203). The 18th century, an age of great rhetorical knowledge on the part of writers and preachers (and at least one writer-preacher, Laurence Sterne), is the heyday of zeugma. In "The Rape of the Lock" Alexander Pope speculates what may happen to Bellinda on a particularly ominous day: Whether the Nymph shall break Diana's Law, Or some frail China Jar receive a Flaw, Or stain her Honour

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    If we are to read Laurence Sterne's A Sentimental Journey, we must abandon the fixed idea about ordinary travel, which are filled with detailed descriptions of the landscapes. In Sterne's work, however, there are unique descriptions of human feelings, compared to the other ordinary travelogues. Consequently, the whole work makes readers confused at first. However, once we are absorbed in that story, we can easily follow Yorick's unique thoughts. Especially his attitude towards women is interesting

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    going to be married to Mrs. Wadman.” —Then he will never, quoth my father, be able to lie diagonally in his bed again as long as he lives.” (Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy) The eighteenth century, what a magnificent time—a contemporary critic is likely to exclaim, and indeed it was. The century of Diderot, Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Kant, Swift, Sterne, and others, whose names still make pound the sensitive hearts of many students of history, philosophy, and literature. The Age of Enlightenment

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    What we’re after, of course, is stories, and we know that history is bulging with beauties. Having found them, we then proceed to fiddle with them to make them the way we want them to be, rather than the way they really were. We get it wrong, willfully and knowingly. But perhaps you could say that the very flagrency of our "getting it wrong" points to the fact that all stories even the history "story" are made. They have an agenda, even if it’s an unconscious one. Perhaps there are many ways to get

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    Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy Perhaps it is no more than the accumulation of years, the simple passage of time that accounts for the recent turn in my thoughts towards the manner in which the events of my life have occurred and brought me to what I politely call "the current state." After all, when those accumulated years require the placement of a number with (to my thinking) the heft of a 29 in front of them to be described, and there is (again, to my thinking) so little to show in the

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    Little Women

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    we meet Laurie, the mysterious grandson of the Old Mr. Laurence living next-door. His real name it Theodore, but he prefers Laurie because he was teased in school by the girls. The girls all spend a lot of time at the Laurences home, all excepting Beth. Because she is afraid of Old Mr. Laurence, she stays away. Mr. Laurence asks if he could have Beth over to play for him. When she does, it creates a lasting bond between them. Old Mr. Laurence loves her playing so much that he gives her a small piano

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    Little Women

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    Jo and Meg attend a New Year’s party, they meet their neighbor Theodore Laurence or Laurie, as he prefers to be called. He is the grandson of their rich neighbor Mr. Laurence. Jo and Laurie established the beginning of a wonderful friendship. All the girls start visiting the Laurence home with the exception of Beth. Beth being the shy one from the sisters and afraid of Mr. Laurence decides to stay home instead. Mr. Laurence finds out that Beth is a wonderful piano player. He talks in private to Mrs

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    the plot revolving around them. Such a character is Friar Laurence. At first glance, one may overlook this character and dismiss him as only a minor player in the story of Romeo and Juliet. Upon closer examination, it becomes obvious that the Friar plays a crucial role in the development of the play. Throughout the play he attempts to guide young Romeo and Juliet through their struggles, and unwittingly causes their deaths. Friar Laurence does just this in the passage I have chosen to analyse, Act

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    World of the Novel: A Student's Guide to Margaret Laurence's The Stone Angel. Ed. Lillian Perigoe and Beverly Copping. Scarborough: Prentice Hall Inc., 1983. 36. Laurence, Margaret. The Stone Angel. Toronto: McClelland &Stewart Inc., 1988. Thomas, Dylan. "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night." The Stone Angel. Margaret Laurence. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart Inc.,1988. Prologue.

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    their absence is not missed. An imposing character in A Bird in the House, Grandfather Timothy Connor’s power over his household is also a sign of his weakness. The house that he built is “part dwelling place and part massive monument” (Margaret Laurence 3). Grandfather Connor, a pioneer in Manawaka, is a monument himself and is often associated with his architectural feat. The title of Margaret Laurence’s novel is A Bird in the House; Grandfather Connor is the house that both shelters and entraps

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    Paul Laurence Dunbar

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    Paul Laurence Dunbar Outline Thesis: The major accomplishments of Paul Laurence Dunbar's life during 1872 to 1938 label him as being an American poet, short story writer, and novelist. I. Introduction II. American poet A. Literary English B. Dialect poet 1. "Oak and Ivy" 2. "Majors and Minors" 3. "Lyrics of Lowly Life" 4. "Lyrics of the Hearthside" 5. "Sympathy" III. Short story writer A. Folks from Dixie (1898) B. The Strength of Gideon and Other Stories (1900) C. The Heart

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    This is only some of the wisdom spoken by Friar Laurence to young Romeo in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet on the decision made by him to wed thirteen year old Juliet in such hastiness. Romeo sought after the confidence of Friar Laurence when he first met Juliet as there was no one else he could turn to, especially when the couple decided they were going to be married. There are many are many instances in the play that indicate "Friar Laurence always intended the best for Romeo and Juliet."

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    Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet - Friar Laurence Friar Laurence plays a most intriguing role in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. He is a priest, and a friend to Romeo. With the absence of Montague parental scenes, Friar Laurence also becomes like a surrogate father to Romeo. Romeo seeks him out to marry him and Juliet, obviously assuming that the friar would without parental permission. The friar greets him and addresses Romeo's past love. He even tells Romeo that he mistook what he felt for Rosaline

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