Free Last Day of the Last Furlough Essays and Papers

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Free Last Day of the Last Furlough Essays and Papers

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    A closer look inside Salinger's eyes

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    while the other was Catholic. With Holden’s father being Catholic, it raised some hardships in Holden’s life when he was questioned about his religion because of his last name being the same as his fathers. Salinger writes, “HE QUIT, THOUGH, WHEN HE MARRIED [HIS] MOTHER” (112). Holden wasn’t pleased with others asking him about his last name, as he began to question his acceptance towards Catholics. He thinks about himself and his sister as atheists, WHICH MOST LIKELY STEMS FROM HIS PAREN’TS RELGIOUS

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    catch

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    significant to him. A novel that’s symbolistic and makes the reader think from a different perspective; Catcher In the Rye distinguishes itself by providing a clear insight to Holden’s mind. This novel follows the 16 year old boy through a couple of days within New York by himself, all the while contemplating his life and everyone/everything around him. Most of the literary themes and elements that are present can cater to the exquisite depth that this novel possesses and help the reader develop their

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    Alienation is the isolation for your indifferences. The main character, Holden Caulfield isolates himself from society and those in it, especially adults who he describes to all be ‘phony.’ Although his isolation, Holden is on a constant search for companionship, but his indifference deprives him of this. Through his alienation, we are shown Holden’s perception of the characters in the text, and this is how we perceive them. This ultimately helps the author, J.D. Salinger to shape the characters

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    Growing up is something that everyone experiences, and along with growing up comes the loss of innocence. In J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the protagonist Holden Caulfield wishes to be the “catcher in the rye” so that he can preserve the innocence of individuals. As Holden travels the streets of New York City, he realizes how ugly the adult world really is. As a troubled teenage boy, Holden does not want to grow up but soon concludes that he cannot stop himself from this process. Because

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    To be young is to be full of bliss, ignorance, and innocence. The world is whatever the child wants it to be. The child is happy living in a pristine world, until one day when that pristine world gets shattered. Death brings the child to reality like a shovel cutting into wet cement. It is hard to overcome for a child because it is so foreign to them. Death leaves a scar on every person, but fo a child the wound is harder to mend because of their ignorance of death and innocence. In The Catcher

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    Catcher In The Rye

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    characters; however that is twisted for accepting the tortured, hypocritical notions that seem to dominate religion, education and politics. Given the attention and notoriety that J. D. Salinger's books continue to receive up and until the present day, it is a wonder that the author has done little for over four decades to bring notice to himself or his literary works. Instead, Salinger has attempted to shield himself as well his literary motives by taking up an almost hermit-like existence. Despite

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    Childhood is crucial to the lives of teenagers and young adults. The experiences, advice, influences that people receive during their formative years is what they carry with them through the rest of their lives. Any emotional turmoil during this period of growth can have serious implications on individuals as they grow older. The book, The Catcher in the Rye, and the movie, Good Will Hunting; tell about the lives of two emotionally troubled young men: Holden and Will. Both of them suffer from emotional

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    Some people have special tokens in their lives, which they hold dear to their hearts. In The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger shows Holden Caufield’s special object to be his red hunting hat, which he bought at a local store for a dollar. This hat holds symbolic meaning throughout the novel. Although it simply is a red hat, in The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger shows that it is so much more, for it acts as Holden’s security blanket, allows him to show his inner confidence, and his homesickness

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    very special place to Holden because it offers him an escape from the tedious responsibilities, as well as the tragedies of the adult world, because unlike reality, nothing in the museum ever changes and nothing bad can ever happen. Later on in the day, while Holden watched Phoebe ride the carrousel, he thought to himself, “I felt so damn happy all of a sudden, the way old Phoebe kept going around and around” (213). Similar to the museum, Holden appreciates how the carrousel will ne... ... middle

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    J.D Salinger’s 1951 colloquial classic novel ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ and Stephen Chbosky’s 1999 epistolary novel ‘The Perks of being a Wallflower’ are texts that seamlessly connect to each other through the concept of preserving one’s innocence. J.D Salinger’s protagonist Holden Caulfield, and Stephen Chbosky’s protagonist Charlie Kelmeckis are youths which are strikingly similar due to their suffering of angst and ambivalence throughout their teenage years. Both Salinger and Chbosky’s characters

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