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    Laos Essay

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    Laos Introduction The Lao People’s Democratic Republic, or Laos, is a politically stable and peaceful landlocked country in Southeast Asia, centrally located in the Mekong sub-region. The country occupies about 236,800 square kilometers and almost half the length of the Mekong River that flows through it. It is bordered by China to the north, Myanmar and Thailand to the west, Cambodia to the south and Vietnam to the east. The country has a tropical monsoon climate with a rainy season from May to

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    LAOS NATION REPORT

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    Introduction My country is Laos. It is a small, poor country in Southeast Asia. The population is about five million. It is 91,400 square miles and the officail language is Lao but french and english is only spoken for buisness purposes mainly. The currency is Kip. Human beings began living in the present territory of Laos more than 10,000 years ago. Stone tools and skulls were discovered in the Huaphan and Luang Prabang provinces. They did carbon dating on these artifacts and test say there around

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    Life of Fear: Laos

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    Asia of just over six and a half million people called Laos. (“Laos Demographics Profile…”). The six and a half million residents of Laos live in a country where human rights violations occur frequently. The Lao Peoples Democratic Republic is a country under a one party communist rule (“Laos Country…”). Laos is a coutry still developing, with most of the population in small areas. Often instead of cities you will find people in villages. In Laos, disappearances of human rights activists are worryingly

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    The People of Laos

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    Laos is considered one of the poorest countries in the world however it has not experience the problem of famine, debt and slum that are associated with many third world and developing countries. Approximately 80% of the Laos population lives in rural areas with the remaining population residing within Laos’s capital city of Vientiane and a few other capital provinces (Laos Cultural Profiles, 2009). In these urban areas of Laos, there are markets and administrative centers of trade and communication

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    nations that have been studied are Indonesia and Laos. The Republic of Indonesia is a developing nation, the fourth largest country in the world by population and the world’s third-largest democracy. The nation faces challenges with improving their health system and the health of their people. The second nation Laos is known as the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), a Marxist-Leninist state ruled by the Lao People’s Revolutionary Party (LPRP). Laos a low-income nation has endured social and economic

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    Genocide of Hmong People in Laos

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    people in the world have not heard of the genocide going on in Laos today. Most people have not taken notice, read about it or bother to spend more than thirty seconds of their lives learning about it. The world has managed to almost entirely ignore the genocide of the Hmong people in Laos for over 30 years and still allows this crime against humanity to continue. Since the 1970s, the ethnic Hmong people in the Southeast Asian country of Laos have been persecuted by the Laotian government (Malakunas,

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    Immigration of the Lao Iu Mein I thought it would be an interesting idea to enlighten and inform people about the Lao Iu Mein and our process of immigrating to the U.S. as well as the challenges we have to overcome. I interviewed my parents, Lao Iu Mein refugees who immigrated to the United States from Thailand. Through this interview, I had a chance to hear for the first time the story of my parents' struggles and experiences as they journeyed to a place where they became "aliens" and how that

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    Lao Tzu

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    Born in the Chinese province of Henan, Lao Tzu lived from c. 604-c.531 BCE. He was a philosopher attributed with the writing of the Tao-Te-Ching and the reputed founder of Taoism. ("Tao" meaning the way of all life, "Te" meaning the fit use of life by all men, and "Ching" meaning text.) Lao Tzu was not his real name but rather an honorary title given to him by his followers meaning "Old Master". Lao Tzu believed that human life is constantly influenced by outer forces; not unlike everything else

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    The Secret War in Laos: Why Was It a Secret?

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    In the beginning of the Vietnam War, Laos was declared a neutral zone at a conference in Geneva by the United States and the Soviet Union (Jones, 2007). As the disputes about Laos’ future government structure continued, the United States believed it was time to take action and continue their fight against communism (Young; Buzzanco, 2006). The Americans were fighting the Cold War for the containment of communism and to make the world safe for democracy. If Laos became a communist country, communism

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    Ruling a country effectively is executed through a variety of methods. Lao-Tzu, a follower of Taoism, expresses his belief on the most efficient way to govern. "The more prohibitions you have, the less virtuous people will be. The more weapons you have, the less secure people will be. The more subsidies you have, the less self-reliant people will be" (25). This quote from Lao-Tzu can be interpreted many different ways. The author discusses what he feels the role of a leader should be, the restrictions

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