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    Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes On February 1st, 1902, arguably the greatest African-American poet of all time was born. He spoke for an entire race, and his words had a huge impact on the treatment of black people and the manner in which they were viewed. He gave hope to those who felt the same way as he did. Although we look back on his work and study it, at the time it was released it had a very real impact to many people. He was Langston Hughes. I believe Langston Hughes's name should be considered

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    Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes James Langston Hughes was born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. He was named after his father, but it was later shortened to just Langston Hughes. He was the only child of James and Carrie Hughes. His family was never happy so he was a lonely youth. The reasons for their unhappiness had as much to do with the color of their skin and the society into which they had been born as they did with their opposite personalities. They were victims of white attitudes and discriminatory

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    Langston Hughes

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    James Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. His parents divorced when he was very small, and his father (who found American racism made his desires to be a lawyer impossible) left the family and emigrated to Mexico. Hughes' mother moved with her child to Lawrence, Kansas, so she and he could live with his grandmother, Mary Langston. Langston Hughes' mother moved to Topeka in 1907, leaving the five-year-old with his grandmother. Langston came from a family of African-American

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    Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes Throughout many of Langston Hughes' poetry, there seems to be a very strong theme of racism. Poems such as "Ballad of the Landlord", "I, Too", and "Dinner Guest: Me" are some good examples of that theme. The "Ballad of the Landlord" addresses the issue of prejudice in the sense of race as well as class. The lines "My roof has sprung a leak. / Don't you 'member I told you about it/ Way last week?" (Hughes 2/4) show the reader that the speaker, the tenant, is of a much lower class

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    Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. He was named after his father, James Hughes, but was known as Langston. He was the only child from his parents James and Carrie Hughes. His parents were not married for long because of an unhappy marriage. When they separated, Langston was left with his mother, who left him behind to move from city to city to find work. Langston ended up living with his 70 year-old grandmother in Lawrence, Kansas. He lived

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    Langston Hughes

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    Cullen, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale, and James Johnson, mainstream American now had a unique window into the plight of African Americans all over the country. One individual though stands out as one of the most prominent figures of the Harlem Renaissance. Langston Hughes defined himself by his ability to pursue the true essence of “black folk” at a time when black identity, culture, or art was considered an oxymoronic concept. Hughes sought to explore the true identity of Black America even amidst criticism

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    Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was an African-American writer of the Harlem Renaissance era. Born in Joplin, Missouri, in 1902, Langston Hughes had a rough upbringing because of all the changes that were occurring at the time. A major upset in his life was when his father left to Mexico to continue his studies in law. When Hughes was seven or eight, he lived with his grandmother who told him stories of important historical African American heroes, such as Frederick Douglas, Sojourner Truth, and

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    Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes People always listen to music, watch movies or plays, and even read poetry without once even thinking what is could be that helps and artist eventually create a masterpiece. Often times, it is assumed that artists just have a “gift”, and people just do not consider the circumstances and situations that gradually mold a dormant idea into a polished reality. This seems to be the case with nearly every famous actor, writer, painter, or musician; including the ever-famous Langston

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    Langston Hughes

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    stating that Langston Hughes was the narrator of black life in the early to mid nineteen hundreds. Not simply because he wrote about the lifestyle of the black Jazz movement, not only because he wrote about the oppression and struggles, but because he lived it, and brought it to a main stage for all to live the experiences through his writings. Langston Hughes' role as a writer is vital to the history of black and American culture and I think he understood this role and embraced it. Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes

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    Langston Hughes is a key figure in the vision of the American dream. In his writings his African-American perspective gives an accurate vision of what the American dream means to a less fortunate minority. His poetry is very loud and emotional in conveying his idea of the African-American dream. Most of his poetry either states how the black man is being surpressed or is a wish, a plea for equality. He does not want the black man to be better than everyone else, but just to be treated equal. Able

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