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    Rudyard Kiplings Kim

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    Rudyard Kiplings Kim I must say that Rudyard Kipling's Kim can be interpreted as a project that articulates the "hegemonic" relations between the colonizer and the colonized during British imperial rule in India. Kipling's novel explores how Kim embodies the absolute divisions between white and non white that existed in India and elsewhere at a time when the dominantly white Christian countries of Europe controlled approximately 85 percent of the world's surface. For Kipling, who believed it

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    Rudyard Kipling

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    Joseph Rudyard Kipling was born on December 30, 1865 to John and Alice Kipling. At the time of Joseph’s birth the Kipling’s had recently arrived in India. They had moved to the town of Bombay (now Mumbai) from England with plans of starting a new life and helping the British government run the continent. Young Joseph Kipling loved the exciting life that came with living in India. He often explored local markets with his nanny and sister, he learned the language at a young age, and fell in love with

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    Henry James once stated that “Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius that I have ever known (lifestyle.iloveindia.com).” Henry James was not alone in his train of thought. By the end of the nineteenth century, Rudyard Kipling had become a household name in Great Britain and quickly gained popularity on a global scale, much to the annoyance of contemporaries such as H. G. Wells and Robert Louis Stevenson. In 1907, Kipling garnered worldwide renown as he became the first writer

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    Rudyard Kipling Essay

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    Messages of Rudyard Kipling Rudyard Kipling born in Bombay in 1865 was a novelist, poet, journalist, and short story writer. His parents sent him to school in England to be educated. Kipling then returned to India when he was 17. When he returned to India Kipling was sure to make himself known as a writer and he did it very quickly. Kipling was known as an excellent journalist. Kipling went back to England in 1889 where he was rewarded celebrity status with his poems. Kipling was a very arrogant

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    Biography of Rudyard Kipling

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    Biography of Rudyard Kipling 1865 - Kipling is born in Bombay, India. 1871 - Kipling and his younger sister Alice are separated from their parents and sent to England to be educated. 1878 - Kipling enters public school in North Devon. 1882 - Kipling ends his formal education and returns to India to become a trainee journalist. 1886 - Publication of Departmental Ditties. Kipling begins to make a name for himself as a young writer of some repute. 1887 - Soldiers Three, In Black and

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    usually look to that artist’s past and discover inspirations or influences that may play a role in the shaping of their later work. The famous author and poet Rudyard Kipling had a rather tumultuous past, so it is only natural that one seek clarification of his works in it. Upon some inspection, one may find that in his earlier years, Kipling was influenced by a group known as the Pre-Raphaelites, not only because they were a notorious organization at the time, but also because two of his mother’s sisters

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    Kipling, Kim, and Anthropology It is widely recognised that the relatively recent sciences of anthropology and ethnology have often seemed in thrall to, and supportive of, the colonial project. Supposedly objective in outlook, anthropological discourse has often been employed to validate and justify theories of race, hierarchy, and power. So-called factual knowledge becomes a means through which racial stereotyping can be bolstered or created. The ethos of Western rationalism allied with the discourse

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    Rudyard Kiplings The Light Yhat Failed Rudyard Kipling is remembered today mostly as a children's author. Kipling's poetry and adult fiction are both worth serious examination; “The Light That Failed” is probably the most important of his adult novels, in which he apparently makes the clearest statements of his beliefs about art and the purpose of life. It's a pretty bleak picture he paints, cloaked in finery and delight but at the core full of stoic acceptance of misery, hardship and death

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    century is the inspirational piece, “If” by Rudyard Kipling. It invades the reader’s consciousness in ways that other poems can not duplicate. The ever-lasting idea of the passing on of knowledge and wisdom from one to another is easily noticed and appreciated by readers who are familiar with the ups and downs of parenting, as well as young adults who may be facing some of life’s challenges that are written in the poem. “If” by Rudyard Kipling is touching in its sincerity and is full of humility

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    In the poem “The Widow at Windsor” Rudyard Kipling uses the voice of one of the men to explain what it means to be one of Queen Victoria’s soldiers. The soldier explains how powerful the Queen is and how she uses her power over others to gain what she wants. He also talks about the soldiers that do her bidding. Any idealistic notions the soldiers may have had at the thought of being soldiers is countered by the reality of their day-to-day lives. Kipling’s own life experiences lends credence to the

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