Free Khmer Rouge Essays and Papers

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Free Khmer Rouge Essays and Papers

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    Khmer Rouge

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    Insert Intro here! Thesis: The turbulent history in Cambodia and its neighbor, Vietnam, led to the rise of Pol Pot as head of Khmer Rouge, and this continued climate of political unrest led to mass genocide and insurgence that continues to contribute to the instability of Cambodia today. The Cambodian struggle against the ninety years of French colonization played a big role in the uprising of communism in Cambodia. In 1863, the French declared Cambodia would be a protectorate of France. In 1941

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    The Khmer Rouge

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    The country of Cambodia almost went down into ruins during this time period. Yet, this harrowing occurrence is overlooked upon. This genocide is commonly referred to as the Khmer Rouge. Society of southeast Asia came to ruins during the Khmer Rouge. One of these problems involve the population of Cambodia. Due to the Khmer Rouge, there was a massive decrease in population. This was caused by either mass killings or the large numbers of immigration (Carney). The population that remained were obligated

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    A History of the Khmer Rouge

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    A History of the Khmer Rouge [insert introduction here] The Khmer Rouge, also known as the Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK), was a group led by Pol Pot that dictated Cambodia from 1975 to 1979 (Time). This massacre has roots back to the 1940s, when France had its own colonized countries such as Cambodia and Vietnam. In 1954, Vietnam defeated France at war and won its independence. The new country of Vietnam was divided into two sections: “communist North Vietnam and pro-Western South Vietnam (backed

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    The Khmer Rouge was the name given to Cambodian communists and the followers of the Communist Party of Kampuchea in Cambodia who famously carried out the Cambodian genocide later. The Khmer Rouge was led by Pol Pot, Nuon Chea, Ieng Sary, Son Sen, and Khieu Samphan. The Khmer Rouge's armed force was gradually developed in the jungles of Eastern Cambodia amid the late 1960s and was carried by the North Vietnamese Army, the Viet Cong, and the Pathet Lao. The Khmer Rouge came out the Cambodian Civil

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    Khmer Rouge And Genocide

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    Khmer Rouge What is genocide? Genocide is when violent crime is done against groups intending to destroy its existence (Genocide). Not many know about the Cambodian genocide, committed by the Khmer Rouge. The Khmer Rouge or also known as the Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK), took ownership of Cambodia. The CPK established the political party of Democratic Kampuchea in 1976 and administered the country until January 1979. In 1975 Khmer Rouge declared Year Zero, where all culture and traditions in

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    bombs never came, the walk continued, and what waited for them was a true horror. Leading up to the communist takeover, lasting from 1975-1979, was the formation of the Khmer Rouge in the 1950s. The Khmer Rouge was an assemblage of angry peasant farmers seeking salvation in communism. In the 1960s, Pol Pot became head of the Khmer Rouge and organized the overthrowal of Cambodia’s government, headed by Lon Nol. By 1975 they had complete control and began their regime of reforming Cambodia into a classless

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    and tyranny. During the Khmer Rouge era, Buddhism was nearly destroyed. Monks were tortured, killed and forced into lay life. Buddhist temples were destroyed and used as a prison area. After the defeat of the Khmer Rouge, Buddhism remained repressed within Cambodia. Some Buddhist monks or leaders responded with forms of social engagement. That being said, Maha Ghosananda is one the monks who played a key role in rebuilding Buddhism in Cambodia after the fall of the Khmer Rouge. His work, Dhammayietras

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    The Khmer Rouge were ruthless monsters that, under Pol Pot, created the Cambodian genocide. They were evil and diabolical. They manipulated the public, Tortured the prisoners, and tried to completely change Cambodia. I will explain to the best of mine and my sources knowledge the dark times of year zero. During the beginning of the genocide, after the war, the Khmer Rouge were able to manipulate the public with their clever thinking and brutal ways. It helped that the Cambodians wanted peace at

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    The Khmer Rouge years was a period of time that devastated all of the small country Cambodia, a story that was so well told by Loung Ung about the Pol Pot regime. The Khmer Rouge years was from 1975 to 1979 (http://www.cambodiatribunal.org). The Khmer Rouge, otherwise known as Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK), conquered Cambodia for four years. The Khmer Rouge forced people to work in the fields including children. To make matters worse, the people that were forced to work were also malnourished

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    difficulties brought on by WWI came a need for change that implemented power to questionable leaders. As a result two different nations Cambodia and Germany experience similar radical approaches to reform, in the form of genocide. Both the Nazi and Khmer Rouge regimes attempted to build these idealistic nations under totalitarianism, but only managed to commit atrocities that will never be forgotten. Through these genocides, survivors Chanrithy Him and Elie Wiesel give us an inside view of what life was

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