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    Juries

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    Juries Juries have been used in our legal system for over 1000 years since the Magna Carta which recognised the right to trail by “the lawful judgment of his peers.” Since 1215 juries became the usual method of trying criminal cases. The independence of the jury was recognized in Bushell’s case (1670) when it was established that the judge could not challenge the decision made. Juries are used in both Criminal and Civil cases although the use of juries is very small. Juries are used in

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    jury

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    Neuschatz, Payne, Lampinen, and Toglia (2001) found that instructing jury members that they may have heard pre-trial publicity and that they were not to use that information to make a judgement may assist in their ability to distinguish between information obtained in court and information obtained through publicity. Another thing to consider with pre-trial publicity is that critical source memory errors tend to increase as the time between encoding and retrieval of that memory increases (Frost,

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    Summary The movie Runaway Jury starts with a shooting in a business office. The movie then continues to people receiving jury summons and people taking pictures of them. It goes on to show Rankin Fitch and the defense committing electronic surveillance during the jury selections. This movie shows how Fitch and the defense attempt to influence the jury to vote for the defense. The movie continuously shows a person by the name of “Marlee” who talks to Fitch and Rohr trying to persuade them to

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    Role Of The Jury In most cases Jurors are predominantly used in criminal trials and only in major civil cases. They have the responsibility of deciding the accused guilt based on the facts presented in the court. Not all criminal cases have jurors you can chose a judge trial but usually people believe the jury will be more sympathetic than the judge so more often than not it’s a jury trial. Advantages of having a Jury When twelve people sit and watch the same trial with the same information

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    Juries in NSW

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    Juries in NSW The jury system plays a very important part in the running of the courts. The jury system is needed in both criminal and civil cases. There are advantages of the jury system as well as disadvantages. However, the jury system is still very important to the justice system. The role of the jury in NSW A jury is a group of people from the community with all sorts of backgrounds, beliefs, religions, education levels and ages, who listens to the evidence of the cases and

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    The Anonymity of Juries

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    The Anonymity of Juries The American criminal justice system has traditionally made the identities and addresses of jurors known to the judge, the prosecution, and the defense. That tradition began to erode with the unprecedented sua sponte trial court decision to use an anonymous jury in the case of United States v. Barnes, a highly publicized criminal trial of notorious organized crime figures in New York City. Since "Barnes," Federal prosecutors in New York have requested and been

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    Jury Duty

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    on a jury is a civic duty and an American tradition. However, some people view jury duty as a chore or as an event that negatively interrupts their lives. Some independent studies have shown that even jury duty has a devastating effect on married life. Due to this and other extraneous situations, there are only a few people who actually want to serve on a jury. This may lead to efforts by potential jurors to, in some way get out of their duty in a jury. What we know of as the current jury duty

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    jury

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    Having a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury of ones peers is a constitutional right given to all in the United States (U.S. Const. amend VI). Jurors are chosen for their ability JURY DECISION MAKING !54 to be unbiased. Both the prosecution and the defense have a hand in choosing jurors. Where one side may be in favor of a sympathetic mother of three the other may choose to select another juror in order to provide the best chance possible for their side of the argument. The process of being

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    The Jury System

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    a trilby jury is one of the main freedoms guaranteed in the Bill of Rights of the US Constitution. In criminal cases, a jury of twelve citizens decides the guilt of the person being accused. The government cannot take someone’s right to life, liberty, or property until those twelve citizens are convinced of the accused person’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. In civil cases, the jury represents common sense and the community’s conscience when resolving disputes. The story of the jury, from its

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    The Jury System

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    The right to trial by jury in the modern times originates from twelfth century England during the reign of King Henry II. This system may originate from an “ancient right for an accused to be tried only “by the lawful judgment of his equals or by the law of the land”” (Thomas). In the United States, trial by jury is mentioned in Article Three of the Constitution and the Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Amendments. For many people, the jury system seems to be the fairest system and most unbiased way of determining

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