Free Jungian archetypes Essays and Papers

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Free Jungian archetypes Essays and Papers

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    Jungian Archetypes and Oedipus the King

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    Jungian Archetypes and Oedipus the King The play Oedipus the King by Sophocles has multiple examples of collective unconscious archetypes from the theories of Carl G. Jung. In general Jung's theories say that there are archetypes that define the world, its people, and why people participate or commit certain activities. Jung explains that these archetypes are harbored in the collective unconscious of every person's mind. The archetype of the hero is one of them. The middle of Oedipus the King

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    that is humble and wise to the dangers that he was one vulnerable to. This development in his personality did not happen until he underwent the conflicts of certain archetypes and the personal conflicts that he had with himself when he was depressed and trapped in his unconscious. Semyon was able to overcome his struggles with each archetype and his struggle in his unconsciousness when he was with the Sea King. Freudian Analysis A psychologist that was famous for his theories regarding the unconscious

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    also known as individuation. According to Carl Jung there are four main aspects to completing the journey of self-awareness, they are, the Persona, the Shadow, the Anima, and the Self. Each aspect, better known as an archetype is crucial to reaching self-awareness and each archetype relies on the one before it. This view on self-awareness was widely publicised and had an impact on many people, one of whom was Robertson Davies, the author of the fictional memoir “Fifth Business”. Davies used this

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    strong reoccurring archetypes within human myth, religion, and folklore. They work together to epitomize one of Jung’s Cores of Personality: the Principle of Opposites. The Principle of Opposites states that both sides of opposite pairs—good and bad, light and dark, joy and despair, et cetera—are present to complete the other. In this way, Marlow and Kurtz are opposite replications of each other in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness; they are doppelgängers that complete each other, as in Jungian theory. Marlow

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    A Psychological Analysis of "Of Mice and Men"

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    psychological aspect of literature but the two most recognized are the Freudian and Jungian approach. The best approach to use when critically analyzing the novel Of Mice and Men, written by John Steinbeck, is the Jungian approach. Because the novel’s main theme is a struggle with the idea of “self”, using this approach allows the reader to understand the main character, its influences, and ultimately his actions. The Jungian approach was brought about by Carl Jung. He believed in the concept of individuation

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    the significance of dreams to the Hindu God-image of Shiva, where he is a personification of the Absolute in a universal and personal sense. This paradoxical, multi-faceted image serves as a grand metaphor for the realignment of the Self through a Jungian unveiling of one’s hidden, inner dynamics. "Gods are metaphors of archetypal behaviours and myths are archetypal enactments" (Samuels 27). The rebirth process is commonly bestowed within dreams because "the dream is the personal aspect of myth"(Transformations

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    The Neverending Story

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    Michael Ende’s The Neverending Story is a timeless tale of adventure, imagination, and self-discovery. The story revolves around Bastian Balthazar Bux, an innocent but awkward, socially outcast, and greatly misunderstood pre-teen boy of a widowered father who finds himself metaphorically and literally lost within the pages of a magical book entitled The Neverending Story. Inside the book, Bastian discovers a terrible affliction has befallen the enchanting land of Fantastica, a mystic world full

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    developed the concepts of the archetypes. The term archetype is not one of his invention, but he used it in an elaborate way in his theories of psychology and culture, giving it his own specific meaning. Archetypes are images and thoughts which have universal meanings across cultures which may show up in dreams, literature, art or religion. They represent fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolved; consequentially, they evoke deep emotions. Jung 's main archetypes are not types in

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    from Italy was the forerunner to the Grimm version. The Italian version, Petrosinella, written by Giambattista Basile, is an example of how culture has an influence on literature. Although this is the case, both fairy tale versions portray jungian archetypes that are often misinterpreted by mainstream portrayals of these fairy tales. Rapunzel is an old fairytale that shares some differences with the Italian version. In the German version the father of Rapunzel is present and is the one in the

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    therapist needs to interject with their own knowledge to complete the gaps in the dream for the dreamer. Evaluation The Jungian Theory is utilized in the drama “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolf” where a young couple are invited to party. Falsafi, et al (2011) reviews the movie in depth and outlines the Archetypes in the movie. This is a perfect example of the Jungian Theory in practice. First one must understand the move and the effects of the middle age crisis. There is a conflict between

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