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    Obason, by Joy Kogawa

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    down upon due to an American fear of retaliation. In Joy Kogawa’s novel, Obason, the narrator is a young Japanese Canadian girl recalling her forced relocation to internment camps. It was a time filled with stereotypes and a great deal of prejudiced behavior. Kogawa makes great use of point of view, selection of detail, and figurative language in order to reflect to narrator’s naive attitude of her past. Through her use of point of view, Kogawa is able to provide simple and clear details on the narrator’s

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    Obasan, by Joy Kogawa

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    and peace. In reality, the war was not as black and white as that. Though the Axis Powers committed heinous crimes against humanity (I.E Holocaust, Murder of millions, Attempt at world domination etc.), the allies also had their own dark moments. Joy Kogawa displays the horrors of the allies’ dark side accurately in the book “Obasan”. The book talks about the impact of a loathing society and internment on Japanese-Canadians during and after World War II. A Japanese woman named Naomi narrates the book

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    Obasan by Joy Kogawa

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    Obasan is a powerful novel written in first person under the eyes of Naomi Nakane, who is the protagonist of the novel. The book centers on the memories and experiences of Naomi. The setting is Western Canada and the novel frequently goes back and forth between 1972 and World War II. The year 1972 is the year which Naomi is currently in and World War II is the point of time where Naomi and many Japanese Canadians had to deal with onerous difficulties and injustices. Naomi resides in the West part

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    Obasan, by Joy Kogawa

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    Obasan, by Joy Kogawa Today, society has become a boisterous world of communication. From telephone conversations to live Internet chat and e-mail, the world has never before been quite so in touch. In the novel Obasan, by Joy Kogawa, Naomi Nakane does not have technology to communicate. Instead, she faces the dilemma of communicating at all. From her family, Naomi is shown the many faceted truths of speech and communication. From strong, silent Obasan, to stubborn, resolute Aunt Emily, Naomi

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    Obasan By Joy Kogawa

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    The book Obasan by Joy Kogawa is a good example of how racial prejudice against people can hurt and deeply wound those oppressed for life. We will look at 3 family members and how the events during World War Two effected them, first Stephen. The Bias Stephen Endured was enough to make him hate himself and his own culture. In Stephens's life the extreme bias towards him caused him to hate himself. He creates games in which the Japanese are weak even if they outnumber their attacker. "There are

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    Joy Kogawa's Obasan

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    Canadians were afraid to speak. She does so by becoming informed of the events through the many conferences Naomi describes her to be a part of and the research she compiles for a paper she authored about Japanese sufferings during the internment (Kogawa, 33; 39). Likewise, when the movement of redress for became a possibility, third generation Japanese Canadian (Sansei) university students, who also did not experience the direct effects of internment, began to advocate for reparation – a movement

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    n

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    Research: Joy Kogawa was born in 1935 in Vancouver, British Columbia. She was sent to an internment camp when she was very young. After World War II ended, her family moved to Alberta where she would graduate high school. In 1954 she attended the University of Alberta, where she studied education. She would later study music at the University of Toronto, followed by studies at the Anglican Women’s Training College and the University of Saskatchewan (Beeler). In 1957, she married David Kogawa. They had

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    The Nature of Power

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    In the book, Obasan, Joy Kogawa uses imagery to convey different symbolic meanings in Naomi's life. Naomi goes through a journey in the novel to uncover the truth of her past. One of the many literary elements that the novel possesses is animal imagery that emphasizes meaning and contributes to the novel's theme. Several animals are mentioned throughout the novel to represent Naomi's emotions and her journey. Kogawa utilizes the several instances of animal imagery in her novel, Obasan, to reveal

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    hardships and unfortunate events that may cause them distress and trauma. In Joy Kogawa's novel about a family of Japanese Canadians, Obasan, it is seen that traumatizing experiences that one faces can carry a burden on them for the remainder of their lifetime. This is conveyed through internal conflicts faced by various characters in the story, the style the story is written in, and the setting the story takes place in. Kogawa conveys that past events can impact an individual's life due to the traumatizing

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    Joy Kogawa's Obasan

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    Since its publication in 1981, Joy Kogawa's Obasan has assumed an important place in Canadian literature and in the broadly-defined, Asian-American literary canon. Reviewers immediately heralded the novel for its poetic force and its moving portrayal of an often-ignored aspect of Canadian and American history. Since then, critics have expanded upon this initial commentary to examine more closely the themes and images in Kogawa's work. Critical attention has focused on the difficulties and ambiguities

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