Free Journey Into Night Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Eugene O'Neill's "Long Day's Journey into Night" As the fog descends around the Tyrone’s summer home, another fog falls on the family within. This fog is that of substance abuse, in which each of the four main characters of Eugene O’Neill’s play, Long Day’s Journey into Night face by the end of Act IV. Long Day's Journey into Night is a metaphoric representation of the path from normalcy to demise by showing the general effects of substance abuse on human psychology and family dysfunctions through

    • 1728 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    American Religion in Long Days Journey into Night The modernist sentiments throughout Long Days Journey into Night, by Eugene O'Neill, are apparent in many different ways.  Among the methods he used was the portrayal of America's withdrawal from traditional religion and modes of behavior.  He used his immigrant Irish family, the Tyrones, as a pedestal for this idea by highlighting their departure from traditional Irish beliefs and their struggle to form new, uniquely American, ones.  O'Neill

    • 873 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    	In the play Long Day’s Journey Into Night by Eugene O’Neill, the Tyrone family is haunted not by what is present in flesh facing them, but by memories and constant reminders of what has been the downfall of the family for years. " No it can never be now. But it was once, before you-" (72) [James Tyrone referring to the Morphine addiction of his wife, Mary, which attributed to the undoing of the family]. Their trials and tribulations are well documented by O’Neill through the proficient

    • 775 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Symbolism is used throughout O¹Neill¹s Long Day¹s Journey into Night, a portrayal of the  author¹s life.  The three prominent symbols, the fog, the foghorn, and Mary¹s glasses, represent the characters¹ isolation from reality.  The symbols in ³Long Day¹s Journey into  Night² are used to substitute illusion for reality.  Although Mary is the character directly associated with living in illusion, all characters in the play try to hide from the truth in their own ways. At the beginning of the

    • 659 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Long Days Journey: The Significance of Fog (8) A Long Day’s Journey Into Night, by Eugene O’Neill, is a deeply autobiographical play. His life was rampant with confusion and addictions in his family. Each character in this play has a profound resemblance, and draws parallels and connections with a member of his own family. The long journey that the title of the play refers to is a journey into his past. Fog is a recurring metaphor in the play; it is a physical presence even before it becomes a crucial

    • 1737 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night The pre-Socratic Greek philosopher Heraclitus said in his theory of the Universal Flux that "everything flows and nothing abides; everything gives way and nothing stays fixed. You cannot step twice into the same river, for other waters and yet others go ever flowing on... Time is a child moving counters in a game." (Allen 103) And so it is with the characters in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night. Time is little more than a game

    • 1733 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    champion liar,” Jessica Lange says in her foreword to Long Day’s Journey Into Night concerning the character of Mary Tyrone (Lange, viii). In Eugene O’Neill’s play Long Day’s Journey Into Night, the mother character of Mary often is viewed as a victim, a creature subject to the poison she is addicted to. However, Mary Tyrone proves to be more complex than an addict spiraling back into her addiction. In Long Day’s Journey Into Night, Mary Tyrone proves she is manipulative and cunning and that she

    • 1449 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Long Day’s Journey Into Night Analysis

    • 1327 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 16 Works Cited

    Eugene O’Neill’s play, Long Day’s Journey Into Night is not morbid, full of despair and hopelessness or unpleasant. James, Mary, Jamie, and Edmund Tyrone all had the opportunity to change their ways. The Tyrone family had opportunities of redemption to help each other and help themselves but they chose to not to take them, even though they all loved each other they couldn't help one another as much as they needed but the opportunity of hope was still present. O’Neill’s play is not morbid because

    • 1327 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 16 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Day’s Journey into Night. The three most notable symbols, the fog, the foghorn and Mary’s' glasses, interpret the author’s life at best. There is double meaning to fog in this play because it is seen as the substance abuse issue and the atmosphere of the family. These are representations of illusions and the family as a whole not wanting to face actuality. The Tyrone family appears to progress during the day and possess a sense of normality, but pulled into the past and the essence of night they are

    • 1155 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Long Day's Journey into Night Eugene by O'Neill - Character Analysis of Mary In the play ¡°Long Day¡¯s Journey into Night,¡± by Eugene O¡¯Neill, the writer depicts a typical day of the Tyrone family, whose once-close family has deteriorated over the years for a number of reasons: Mary¡¯s drug addiction, Tyrone Jamie and Edmund¡¯s alcoholism, Tyrone¡¯s stinginess, and the sons` pessimistic attitude toward future. In the play, all of the four characters are miserable about life, and they all remember

    • 1437 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Best Essays

    Long Day’s Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill is a complicated story. It shows a day in the life of a dysfunctional family. This family is made up of four extremely different personalities. Tyrone is the sympathetic father. Mary is the morphine addicted mother. Jamie is the difficult older son and Edmond is the sick younger son. Everyone in this family has their strengths and weaknesses. In Tyrone’s case his strengths and the weight of his family’s weakness makes him the most sympathetic

    • 1919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Ending to Eugene O'Neil's Long Day's Journey Into Night It is understandable that so many people in our class did not find the last act of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night a satisfying one; there is no tidy ending, no goodbye kisses or murder confessions; none of the charaters leave the stage with flowers in their hands or with smiles on their faces and none of the characters give explanatory monologues after the curtain falls, as we've become accustomed to by reading so much

    • 824 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    strong, protective, and decisive” while woman as “emotional (irrational), weak, nurturing, and submissive” (Tyson 85). Because of such system, women are indoctrinated into the mentality that they are inferior to men. In the play, Long Day’s Journey into Night, Eugene O’Neill portrays Mary Tyrone, the female protagonist, was being oppressed socially and psychologically by her family. Her husband, James, and two sons, Jamie and Edmund, attempt to support her and keep her stable. However, their remedies

    • 1131 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Character Profiles from O'Neils Long Days Journey Into Night Description: James Tyrone is 65 years of age, but looks to be in early 50’s. He is about 5ft 8inches tall, is broad-shouldered, and deep-chested but appears taller and more slender due to his soldierly posture. Walks tall, head up, chest out, stomach in and shoulders squared. Very attractive for being older, he has deep set dark brown eyes and thinning gray hair. Sports a full white beard. Personality can be described as cheap, penny-

    • 1240 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    during this generation’s younger years were the precedents by which their offspring lived. Beverly Weston and James Tyrone both committed questionable acts in the past that affect the lives of everyone else in their families. All throughout Long Day’s Journey Tyrone is reproached for being cheap; his family believes that that stinginess is what led to Mary’s morphine addiction. This accusation plagues Tyrone and when he and his wife begin discussing it, he beseeches her, “Mary! For god’s sake, forget the

    • 1944 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Man’s Struggles of Fate by the Curse of Birth in Eugene O'Neill's A Long Day's Journey into Night Eugene O’Neill’s A Long Day’s Journey into Night deals with tragedy and its attendant focus on character rather than plot. Another emphasis on the play is on the past that ceases to haunt his characters. O’Neill’s characters of A Long Day’s Journey into Night struggle with the past. These characters all seem to agree with Mary Tyrone who claims that a person “can’t help being what the past made

    • 1475 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    can function as individuals or come together to function as one entity. There is always at least one person in a family that is the glue of the family, what causes it to function properly or improperly in some cases. In the case of Long Day’s Journey into Night written by Eugene O’Neill, it is Mary Tyrone that is the proverbial family glue that causes the family problems through and through. Since Mary blames everyone but herself, that seems to point out that perhaps she herself is the one to blame

    • 765 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    alienated, low-class stoker named Yank. Yank’s life becomes a whirlwind when Mildred, the daughter of a wealthy steel owner, looks at Yank like he is a hairy ape. This action creates the withdrawal Yank exhibits. The remainder of the play is Yank’s journey to find his place in society’s realms. He searches for his place in a stokehole, at Fifth Avenue, and in jail. Ultimately Yank’s trek ends as a gorilla squeezes the life out of Yank—O’Neill’s suggestion that Yank can only belong in death (O’Neill

    • 1768 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Events Of The Year 1952

    • 2028 Words
    • 5 Pages

    dramatists still held audiences and won new admirers. Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, and Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman were written in the 40's but were still very popular in the 50's. Eugene O'Neill finished Long Day's Journey into Night in 1952. Williams wrote Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and Baby Doll. Musicals were very well received. Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II, and Joshua Logan won acclaim with South Pacific in 1952. One of the most emotionally charged plays of 1952

    • 2028 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    One of the most interesting is the Night Journey. The story of the Night Journey begins with Muhammad being awakened by the Angel Gabriel (Stewart, 61). Gabriel was not alone but in the company of a magnificent horse who had wings (Stewart, 61). Muhammad rode upon the horse to the “Temple of Jerusalem” (Stewart

    • 1557 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays