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    Celebrities and Gossip

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    vulgar tastes. Also, as the journalistic use of subject matter that appears to vulgar tastes. This can be applied to a variety of news-gathering media. Print: be it newspapers, tabloids, or magazines, audio and visual: be it TV specials, daily and weekly shows, or through the radio with shows such as Howard Stern, or even electronic: through the World Wide Web, can all involve “the journalistic use of vulgar subject matter”. It is nearly impossible to avoid “journalistic sensationalism”. But lets

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    Who Is Kurt Vonnegut

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    In this piece, the sardonic and biting wit often seen in Kurt Vonnegut’s works melts into New England colloquialisms and purported journalistic observation. The narrator mentions the details of each murder grippingly and often nearly too closely, bothering the reader and muddling the possibility for these observations to be truly journalistic, for such lurid detail is already unseemly to the academic psyche, let alone the public’s. The frequent hyperbole used, as word-of-mouth and the narrator filled

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    political/ideological communities, and re-appropriating dominant cultural narratives from hegemonic governments. But it can also polarize communities, and debilitate political discussion. It can also be a forum for faulty information unscrutinized by anyone with journalistic expertise can be made wholesale,

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    Language Analysis in a Text Text 1 An extract from chapter 18, ‘Population, health and ageing.’ By Anthony Giddens (London Polity Press, 1993, pp. 602 – 605.) This is a purely academic text. Its main aim is to inform and educate its audience. To achieve this he employed features that are typical of academic writing. The sentences are straight to the topic. He also employed sequential development of the theme of the essay, leading his audience through the history of health and illness

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    The roles of science, the media, and politics greatly influence public opinion and understanding of the world around us. These three spheres of information and action are invariably linked when discussing complex global issues like climate change. However, the presentation and resolution of disagreement within the three spheres is incredibly independent. The many ways that climate change, specifically the debate on the existence of climate change, is portrayed within these spheres can greatly affect

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    more like a novel, considering that he wasn’t there for almost all of the back stories and he had to use his imagination and work around what has been said to create an actual story. In order to create more of a fiction novel, Capote mixes his journalistic elements with fictional elements, he inserts in his own opinion and creates a story. And finally, I think Capote’s main purpose in writing this book is to put out to the readers a different perspective on criminals and convince them to be more

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    journalism is to create a learning type of community. A community that discusses issues, not just based on emotion, but based on facts about how things work. Switching from a traditional platform of journalistic objectivity to public journalism may not be a bad thing if we can use objectivity in our journalistic methods. It's a better standard anyway, and it can keep people honest. So we shouldn't throw out public journalism as an approach. Investigative reporting and editing has its place. The focus

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    historian Theodore H. White for LIFE magazine’s December 6, 1963 issue. The author’s personal interview of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy – conducted at her behest exactly one week following President Kennedy’s assassination -- forms the basis for the journalistic essay and is part of a series of pieces by White known historically as the “Camelot Documents.” That White penned this essay with editorial suggestion and oversight from the grieving First Lady was reported around the time of the piece and is

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    Frontline

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    “Frontline” exposure of current affairs programs makes a mockery of journalistic integrity. Through humorous portrayals of important issues, and clever imitation “Frontline” makes veiwers aware of ridicule towards journalistic integrity. While current affairs programs are based on real life stories, which are enhanced to ‘make good news’, Frontline is based on the making of these stories. Frontlines purpose is to inform the audience of the life behind a current affair program but more importantly

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    1. What were the critical strategic decisions made at the Washington Post during Katharine Graham’s tenure as President, CEO, and Chairman of the Board? The most critical decision was the one to pursue journalistic integrity as a strategy for achieving a sustainable newspaper. It does not logically follow that if one were to release a news publication, particularly a publication in Washington, D.C., that it should necessarily choose to follow a policy of antagonism toward the White House. As this

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