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    Justice John Paul Stevens initially took a moderate stance on abortion rights prior to and immediately after joining the Supreme Court. When President Gerald Ford nominated then-Judge Stevens, abortion rights were not as politically controversial as they are today. In a sense, Justice Stevens did not have to take a strong stance on abortion in order to make it onto the Supreme Court. As his time on the Supreme Court went on, Justice Stevens developed a more pro-choice stance in deciding abortion

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    gsgfd

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    or religions, those of other beliefs are made to feel like outsiders” (Chemerensky). After all inclusion is part of what this country was established on. Former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens agrees with Chemerensky’s view that neutrality and accommodation are not desirable approaches. According to Stevens these two approaches would “replace Jefferson’s “wall of separation” with a perverse wall of exclusion – Christians i...

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    Gregory Lee Johnson was convicted for desecration of a venerated object; a violation of a Texas Statute in the County Criminal Court No. 8 of Dallas County by Judge John C. Hendrik. He sentence was one year in prison and a fine of $2000. The respondent appealed with the Dallas Court of Appeals, Fifth Supreme Judicial District, 706 S.W.2d 120 (1986), Judge Vance affirmed the conviction, and a rehearing was denied. The defendant subsequently petitioned for a discretionary review with the Texas Court

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    Texas Vs Johnson Case

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    The Texas vs Johnson case didn't drastically change the way people viewed things. Yes, the trial caused a lot of uproar, especially in Texas because of its patriotism, but it wasn't a case in which a law or amendment needed to be changed but rather was a case in which an amendment needed to be understood. Johnson’s act of burning the American flag in front of Dallas City Hall, in order to protest the Reagan administration during the Republican National Convention, was deemed as a sign of “symbolic”

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    Retardation and Capital Punishment One can agree (or not) with the recent ruling by the Supreme Court that the death penalty should not apply to retarded citizens because it violates the Eighth Amendment's prohibition against "cruel and unusual punishment," and still be troubled by the twisted road the court took to reach its destination. Reading the history of the Eighth Amendment shows that it proceeded from concerns over the methods the state could use to take the life of a convicted criminal

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    Stevens’ dissent claims that this decision made by the court is sort of backpedaling on what the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was meant to uphold, mainly eliminating employment practices that have discriminatory effects. This case, according to Stevens, rejects a lot of which Title VII is supposed to uphold. Stevens brings up a court case called Griggs v. Duke Power Company, in which the ruling was that the

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    rulings of the Court. The Brethren shows the flowering of Nixon's four judicial selections: Warren E. Burger, Harry A. Blackmun, Lewis F. Powell, Jr., and William H. Rehnquist. The final chapter introduces President Ford's only appointment, John Paul Stevens. Burger was Nixon's first appointee, replacing retiring Chief Justice Earl Warren. By the late 1960s, federal courts and school districts were struggling with court ordered busing. Once Burger joined the court, the longtime Nixon friend clearly

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    Free Speech in Cyberspace ABSTRACT: Reno v. ACLU, the 1997 landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court providing sweeping protection to speech on the Internet, is usually discussed in terms of familiar First Amendment issues. Little noticed in the decision is the significance of the ontological assumptions of the justices in their first visit to cyberspace. I analyze the apparent awareness of the Supreme Court of ontological issues and problems with their approaches. I also argue that

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    By the second half of the 20th century, as more federal laws protected against gender discrimination and the national zeitgeist turned more towards gender equality in the public sphere, decisions in landmark Supreme Court cases began striking down more statutes that were discriminatory based on gender. However, for a while the Court refused to place a higher level of scrutiny on claims of gender discrimination under the Equal Protection Clause. In 1971, the Supreme Court examined a challenge to the

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    The Pledge Of Allegiance

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    First, I would like to talk about the history of the Pledge of Allegiance. Many people today recite the Pledge of Allegiance but do not know the history that took place behind it. The Pledge of Allegiance was originally written more than a century ago. The original pledge was: I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic, for which it stands, one Nation, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all . The flag serves as a symbol of our country and its proud traditions of freedom and equal opportunity

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