Free John of England Essays and Papers

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    “Sir John the First, he was the worst.” This is a child's rhyme and yet a sentiment emulated by many well respected pieces of literature not only today but throughout history. Nearly eight hundred years later and he is still possibly the most notorious king in English history. However, was he really as bad as he is presumed to be? Stories such as Robin Hood and Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe would have you think as much. But, if these were wholly accurate then why would Winston Churchill have said “When

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    How and Why Was King John portrayed in history? King John was born on the 24th of December in the year of 1167 to King Henry II and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine. John was the youngest of five sons to his father, and had been nicknamed “Lackland” by Henry as all of his elder brothers had received a certain share of dominion apart from John alone, however, John seemed to be his father’s favourite. In 1173, a marriage proposal was set up by Henry for his beloved youngest son to Humbert III’s daughter

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    Known as John Lackland (in French, Jean sans Terre), additionally count of Mortain, King John was the child of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, and the more youthful sibling of Richard I. Amid his rule, he was compelled to acknowledge the Magna Carta and lost a large portion of England's land holdings in France. John was Henry's most loved child, however, Henry was not ready to present to him the grounds he had trusted; this is the place John's handle of "Lackland" started. He was given the lordship

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    Magna Carta Ideology

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    group of people or way of life. It details how society should be organised and the methods of which to achieve this society. The Magna Carta can be recognized as an ideological document as it lays out the system if beliefs held by the free men of England in the 13th Century. It also forms a foundation for contemporary understanding of political ideologies, such as neo-Liberalism, however also offers a point of argument for many political ideologies. Count Antoine Destutt de Tracy, a French materialist

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    one of the most important historical documents in deciphering the idea of human freedom and equality in England. On June 1215, after his inability to “contain” an insurrection, King John signed the Magna Carta, under the pressure of a group of Norman barons. Unlike his predecessors, John was unsuccessful in war; his military was a failure both at home and abroad. John angered the barons in England by abusing his power of patronage. He induced high taxes on his subjects paradoxical to the feudal system

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    Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine In the year 1122, soon to be Duke William X of Aquitaine was informed that his bride of one year, Aenor, daughter of the Viscount Aimery, had bore him a daughter. She was christened Alia-Aenor, or Eleanor. Since Aquitaine consisted of more than a third of the entire land of France, she was a heiress of some esteem. Soon after, Aenor gave birth to another daughter, Aelith (Petronella) and then to the heir that William so desired, William Aigret. Unfortunately, when

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    King John Research Paper

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    Born in Beaumont Palace, Oxford December 24, 1166 King John was the youngest son of King Henry II and Eleanor. John was Henry's most loved child however Henry was not give him everything else he could offer to his other four sons. As a child he was always forgotten about and overshadowed by his older brothers. When his father first split up the provinces to all of his five sons, John received no share therefore he received the nickname “Lackland”. He grew up among family problems and fights, and

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    European Kings Essay

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    see what difficulties they faced in trying to increase their control and what strategies they used that yield gains and losses. In England there were more instances of kings encountering difficulties in their quest to increase their control over their territories and subjects more so than the French kings. In England, William of Normandy was crowned King of England in 1066. Under his reign, he merged Anglo-Saxon and Norman

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    England and France were evolving in the 1000s, while the Holy Roman Empire and papacy were engaged in their struggle. Strong monarchy came earlier to England than to France, and it was the English who were most successful in dictating constitutional limits on the crown. English parliamentary and French royal absolutism are both rooted in the High Middle Ages. Since the end of England’s Anglo-Saxon period came to and end in 1066, France and England were involved with each other until the mid-sixteenth

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    William Marshall

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    outstanding ambassador for England during the turbulent twelfth and thirteenth centuries. From a virtually obscure beginning, William evolves into one of the most dominant stately figures of the time in England. During his brilliant military and political career, William served as knight for the courts of Kings Henry II, Richard (the Lion-hearted), and John. William was born around 1147 to John Marshall and Sybil of Salisbury during the reign of King Stephen. His father, John Marshall, served as a court

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    Eleanor of Aquitaine

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    Eleanor of Aquitaine In an age when men were considered to be superior to women, Eleanor of Aquitaine proved that conclusion wrong by becoming one the greatest queens ever known in history, first as the Queen of France and later as the Queen of England. But many queens during the medieval ages were not able to accomplish what Eleanor did in her lifetime. How did Eleanor become such a powerful queen during the period in which she lived. Eleanor was the eldest of three offspring of William X, the

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    essay I explore the decisions and policies by John that led up to one of the most dramatic periods in early medieval history and earned him the reputation of a bad, unlucky and cruel King. John became King in 1199, he owned nearly as much land in France than he did in England. But unfortunately for John he lost lots of this French territory, including Normandy. Richard the Lion heart was the main reason for this loss. Richard was king before John and had made his nobles in France very angry

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    The Reign of King John

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    only remaining heir to the throne was his younger brother John. Regarded as one of the worst kings of England, John’s reign was no doubt unpopular. As hated as John was, there was no denying that he was a hard worker, competent general and able king. It was not John’s failure as a strategist that made his reign crumble, but rather his underlying character flaws, such as his unyielding cruelty, pettiness and lack of sympathy for his people. John was raised in a family of liars and cheaters, laying the

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    King John, also known as John Lackland, was born in December 24, 1167 and belonged in the High Middle Ages. He was the youngest son of King Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. They had eight sons together. When King II assigned provinces to his sons, King John received no share, which is why people in England stared to refer him as John Lackland. King Henry II died then his older brother, King Richard inherited the kingdom. Not long after he mysteriously died then King John inherited the throne. King

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    Pope Innocent III began a sequence of changes that influenced the face of secular and ecclesiastical Europe through careful use of law and political manipulation. It has been remarked that the papacy acquired and retained the most power under the leadership of Pope Innocent III during the late 12th and early 13th centuries. I plan to examine sources primarily pertaining to the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 and secondly to a collection of Innocent III’s papal letters. In my analysis, I hope to draw

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    the ideas and laws it placed in England during the time. Many of these ideas are still carried and used in not only England, but the majority of Europe and other World Powers today. “Great Charter” is the direct translation of the phrase “Magna Carta.” The Manga Carta was proposed by Barons to King John. It was proposed primarily due to the abuse of power and failure of the King. King John had lost many battles with France, and ultimately ignored the people of England. The Pope at the time, Pope Innocent

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    back to the year 1215. The document defined the rights of King John, who ruled England at the time. Throughout history the document's meaning has expanded to include all people, not just nobles. King John ruled at the beginning of the 13th century. As John reigned, he was hated by many commoners. He lost English land to France and was losing money revenue. To compensate for the loss, he demanded higher taxes from the people of England. The English barons were not happy about this, not just because

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    Evolution of Law

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    Evolution of Law The government our nation has established today has come a long way from its roots. Starting with the Napoleonic Code and eventually ending with the Ratified Constitution of the United States. Rome came to England bringing the Roman Code, thus law begins. The Roman Code was a rigid code that in reality did not change much. It required ample detail and was difficult to understand at times. For example, if there where five different murders all using five different colored knives

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    they have been changed by the generations to fit their context and ideas of a hero. One example is the legend of Robin Hood and His Merry men. Legends claim that Robin Hood lived during the reign of both King Richard and King John, and was outlawed during the reign of King John. One of the most famous of legends, this story is typically about Robin Hood and his men robbing rich fat friars, and people of nobility to help the poor. However, often overlooked is how Robin Hood became an outlaw. The 2010

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    The Decline of Feudalism

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    problem like this to be solved violently. (BOOK) In the end though, four major crusades, excluding small other ones, ... ... middle of paper ... ...g land now which boosted the wool and cotton industries. All the peasants on the outskirts of England soon moved into the city after the epidemic had swept. The serfs started to gain power because of all the people ahead of them on the feudal system that had died. This messed up the feudal order and lead to the final blow that destroyed feudalism

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