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    masculinity and standing amongst one's peers. These expectations and requirements for manhood are constantly reinforced by society. The prevailing stereotype of the classic "Marlboro Man" along with movie heroes such as James Bond, Indiana Jones, and John Wayne give the impression of the adventurous ladies' man who laughs in the face of danger and can do no wrong. Arthur Conan Doyle's tale of adventure, The Lost World, is an excellent example of the search for manhood and glorification of masculinity

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    diligence.  John Steinbeck uses three seemingly different characters to convey the same message, one of hope and perseverance. When I first read East of Eden, nothing about Cal Trask's personality or his mannerisms made him likable. He was introverted, cold, and hard.  I could not help but sense th... ... middle of paper ... ...EINBECK(1902-1968).  San Jose State University.  17 Jan. 2001.  <http://www.library.sjsu.edu/staff/harmon/steinbec.htm>. Levant, Howard.  The Novels of John Steinbeck:

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    A Subtle Metamorphosis in The Grapes of Wrath The spirit of unity emerges as the one unfailing source of strength in John Steinbeck¹s classic The Grapes of Wrath. As the Joad family¹s world steadily crumbles, hope in each other preserves the members¹ sense of pride, of courage, and of determination. A solitary man holds a grim future; with others to love and be loved by, no matter how destitute one is materially, life is rich. This selflessness is not immediate, however; over the course of the

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    The True American Spirit of The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck's novel, The Grapes of Wrath is an excellent portrayal of the common and true Americans. While it is of course a book of deep thought and incredible symbolism, most of all The Grapes of Wrath gives these common American workers a voice and a distinct identity, and doesn't just turn them into a stereotype or cliche. Steinbeck's book could be regarded as one of the best books from America and perhaps the best on the subject

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    Camaraderie in The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men, two novels published concurrently by John Steinbeck, both depict camaraderie between dust bowl migrants. The main characters in Of Mice and Men, George and Lennie, form a bond, while struggling to reach their goal, a small farm. Similarly, Jim Casy of The Grapes of Wrath befriends Tom Joad, a friendship eventually uplifting the whole migrant community. Outwardly, the two relationships may seem to

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    complex but passionate ideals about good and evil. Some relish in the power that this manipulation of reality wields; others are more innocent in that they are simply yielding to a universal longing for something in which to believe. In both John Gardner's Grendel and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, creation is a central theme. Victor Frankenstein is inexplicably driven to make a creature like himself, though he doesn't have any external reason for doing so. The monster himself enacts a kind

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    Migrant Workers in The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men John Steinbeck wrote about what surrounded him. At the time he was writing, the nineteen-thirties, a great depression was plaguing the United States. Many people were out of work. Many farmers were losing their farms and homes. An extreme drought had also wrecked the farms of the Midwest and made them into what is now referred to as the "dust bowl". It was a terrible time to be poor, and most were. People died of malnutrition every

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    is a novel that was written by John Steinbeck. This novel explores the predicaments that families faced in the "Dust Bowl" of Western America. The story shows how the Joad families, like many other families, were made to leave their homes because big business took over and the little man was left to fend for himself. Times were changing and families had to adjust even if that meant starting a whole different life in a brand new place. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck portrays the drawbacks

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    The Implicat of Sin in The Scarlet Letter Sin is the transgression of a moral code designated by either society or the transgressor.  The Puritans of Boston in the novel, The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, establish a rigid moral code by which to purge their society of deviants.  As this society is inherently theocratic, the beliefs and restrictions established by religion are not only incorporated into law but constitute all law.  In this manner, the moral code of the Puritan

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    Pearl's Contribution to The Scarlet Letter In Hawthorne's epic novel, The Scarlet Letter he discusses Pearl, a main character, and her contribution in making the novel a romantic one. Hawthorne uses three types of romantic topics relating to Pearl. Stereotypical characters, supernaturalness of characters, and the imaginary aspect of characters are all qualities of romantic language Hawthorne uses to better develop Pearl's character.  Over the course of the novel Hawthorne uses all of

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