Free John Edgar Wideman Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free John Edgar Wideman Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 2 - About 18 essays
  • Better Essays

    are not always obvious and most times there are multiple conflicts within a single story. This case is no different for Brothers and Keepers by John Edgar Wideman. Wideman’s work is memoir that focuses on a comparison between himself and his brother that works to understand how each one of them ended up where they did in life. With in this work by Wideman there exist numerous conflicts, protagonists, and antagonists. One of the main conflicts that occur throughout the novel is between Robby (the protagonist)

    • 1124 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Authorial Voice

    • 1213 Words
    • 3 Pages

    adventure of sharing ones own story can feel scary and relieving, both chaining and freeing. Harriet Jacobs and John Edgar Wideman undergo this while telling their stories, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Jacobs) and Our Time (Wideman). Each author is self-conscious throughout their stories. Both authors speak about a minority in their stories; Jacobs speaks of the female slave and Wideman speaks of the African-American gangster. Because they tell the story of a minority to a majority, they can't

    • 1213 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Wideman Vs. Limerick

    • 874 Words
    • 2 Pages

    John Edgar Wideman’s “Our Time”, and Patricia Nelson Limerick’s “Empire of Innocence”, are two very different stories about one particular theme. In these selections both authors are writing history. Wideman is writing the history of his brother’s life, and Limerick is writing the history of the old west. Although the theme is the same, the two authors’ styles, methods, and writing concerns differ greatly. In the following passage from “Our Time”, John is visiting his brother, Robby, in prison. While

    • 874 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Human Nature in Bartholomae and Petrosky's Our Time, Theft, and Music of the Swamp Why should college students read the stories that are assigned in English courses? Other than to satisfy the professor, what is the purpose of reading these difficult writings of people we don't know or care about? Many of these students find themselves asking, "What is this writer talking about?" Confused, some quickly give up trying to understand the story and make reading something just to get through, diminishing

    • 3114 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    By definition, a textual analysis shows the reader how and why an author has used certain techniques and strategies to present and develop an idea. In John Edgar Wideman’s Brothers and Keepers (1984) Wideman uses figurative language consistently in an attempt to convey tone, attitude, persona and imagery to the reader. Although this language isn’t always apparent at first glance, looking deeper into the reading will help the reader fully understand what the author really means. Figurative language

    • 1062 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Despair

    • 889 Words
    • 2 Pages

    John Edgar Wideman’s “Our Time” is an indirect narration of his brother, Robby Wideman’s life, and a parallel journey of Wideman through those times. The story is in fractions; presented in the direct point of view by Wideman, his mother and Robby: while at the same time Wideman representing all of them from his point of view. A person is more like a mid-point of a triangle, where environment, family and personality strike at him perpendicularly, while each of them is parallel to a person’s action

    • 889 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    memoir Fatheralong, John Edgar Wideman eloquently exemplifies the link between racist social structures and the development and growth of African American children through his personal experiences and relationships growing up. Memories of racial profiling and discrimination lathered in Wideman’s sentiment

    • 1643 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    John Edgar Wideman’s essay “Our Time” presents us the story of his brother Robby. The essay is unique because Wideman uses the “voices” of his brother Robby, his mother, and himself to convey the different perspectives of each person. The author uses the three different points of view in an attempt to express his emotions, and what he was going through while trying to understand the motives behind Robby’s transgressions. Wideman articulates that choices in life are often difficult to make, and other

    • 667 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Emancipating from Society

    • 1157 Words
    • 3 Pages

    "Emancipating From Society" In "Our Time," John Wideman bravely dives into the pits of a scorpion society - one that juxtaposes the poor and minorities with the rich and people in power - in an attempt to understand how society affects the lives of each individual in its clutches. Wideman's path is angular to that of his brother, Robby's. They both start off in the same situation, same locale, but their paths stray off to different ends. Wideman attempts to find an explanation for why he was

    • 1157 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In John Edgar Wideman’s article, “Looking at Emmett Till” shows Emmett’s horrific murder as the living proof of the racism that occurred at that time in history and how it has revived its way back to distress our country with the same racism that existed 61 year ago. Today, more than ever, African Americans are facing another battle for equality. It seems as if the phrase, “history eventually repeats itself” has been prove by the continuous breaking news of African Americans been murder by white

    • 1847 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
Previous
Page12