Free John Dryden Essays and Papers

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    William Davenant, Son of Shakespeare?

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    life was interesting from the moment of his birth. His mother was Jane Shepherd Davenant, but the identity of his true father was largely disputed (“Davenant, William” 73). Was his father John Davenant, husband to Jane, owner of the town tavern, and mayor of Oxford, or William Shakespeare, the well-known writer? John and Jane raised William Davenant together, but some people suspect that Shakespeare was actually his father. When Shakespeare was in town, he often lodged at the Crown Tavern, the inn owned

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    Abstract Between the characters of Octavia and Cleopatra there exists a "moral contrast" (Bree 110) -a conflict of Roman ideals and Cleopatra's foreignness. Throughout the tradition of Cleopatra, authors, including Plutarch, Shakespeare, Dryden, and Fielding, as well as filmmakers such as Mankiewicz, have separated Cleopatra from Rome and Octavia because of her combination of political power and sexuality: "The notion of Cleopatra that we have inherited identifies her primarily as being the adversary

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    Alexander Pope and Mary Leapor write of a common theme in their lodescriptive poems “Windsor-Forest” and “Crumble-Hall,” respectively. However, the two approach at very differently angles: Pope as if in nostalgia, remembering a place of Eden and a picturesque nature that flirts with human nature; and Leapor as if in a dream, describing what can be considered a place of wonder with vast halls and grandeur scenes. While the two poems share similarities, especially regarding the intense imagery, there

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    portraying wickedness in ways that give delight, [Jeremy Collier] argued contemporary plays cultivated in their audiences the vices of their characters" (2270 Longman Anthology of British Literature). These authors include such notable minds as John Dryden, William Congreve and William Wycherley. Collier especially criticizes the profane use of language and the abuse of clergy all of which, he felt, manage... ... middle of paper ... ...sctn=1 Garrick, David. The Dramatic Works of David Garrick

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    rule closed the theatre in England in 1642. But the drama retained its hold under the Cromwell government. The playwright William Davenant obtained permission to stage a play called ¡§The Siege of Rhodes¡¨ an opera* in 1656. To this opera pattern, Dryden contributed the heroic play, ¡§The Conquest of Granada¡¨. In it he cited examples of the ancient Greek writer Ariosto, with his story of love and valour (great bravery) as to his conception of the heroic play. Thus the heroic play combined some of

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    Pope, Swift, and Aristocratic Women

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    The task of satirist is to criticise the vices and follies of their contemporary society. However, the purpose of satire is to be universal. In this case, we are going to focus our attention on the works of two major poets of the 18th century which can be subscribed within Augustan literature: Alexander Pope’s The Rape of the Lock and Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room”. In Pope’s mock-heroic verse The Rape of the Lock (1717) what is criticised is a moral fault: mainly, immoderate female

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    Robert Burns

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    Although his family struggled, Burns managed to obtain an education. At the age of six, Burns and his brother Gilbert were sent to John Murdoch’s School in Alloway. In 1768 Burns and his brother left the school and Burns briefly boarded as a pupil of John Murdoch at Ayrshire Grammar School in 1773. Through Murdoch’s influence, Burns read Shakespeare, Milton, Pope and Dryden. However, a great deal of Burns’ education took place in his own home. He was encouraged in his self-education by his father and

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    runs deeper than this. As is often the case with Western encounters with alien peoples, the representation bifurcates. What we tend to find is either the "noble savage" or the barbarous, bloodthirsty primitive. The first term here was coined by John Dryden, and conveys the idea of man in a state of nature, untainted by the perceived evils of civilisation, such as avarice or ambition. It is a projection of the fear that somehow the Western way of life has become corrupt, and is in need of redemption

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    The value of physical beauty in literature is often hyperbolized and used as a signifier for romance, ingenuity and moral goodness. The subversion of this trope however, gives forth a more nuanced conversation on the role of physical appearance in society and more specifically how it connects to intellect and destiny. The reinvention of the subversion of beauty to reveal its connection, or lack there of to intellect, and to a tragic fate, can be seen along four texts of different genres, generations

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    Hamlet: Hamlet's Sanity

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    Hamlet: Hamlet's Sanity “Great wits are sure to madness near allied, and thin partitions do their bounds divide.” Though John Dryden's quote was not made in regard to William Shakespeare's Hamlet, it relates very well to the argument of whether or not Hamlet went insane. When a character such as Hamlet is under scrutiny, it can sometimes be difficult to determine what state he is in at particular moments in the play. Nonetheless, Hamlet merely pretends to be insane so that he can calculate

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