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    John Coltrane

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    John Coltrane John Coltrane was born on September 23, 1926, in Hamlet, North Carolina. This particular day had important astrological significance. It was the day of the autumn equinox, one of only two days through the year where night and day are perfectly equal (Fraim 7). Shortly after his birth, Coltrane's family moved to High Point, North Carolina. He lived in a nice neighborhood sharing a house with his mom and dad, aunt and uncle and cousin, and his grandparents, the Blairs (7). Even

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    Biography on John Coltrane

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    John Coltrane was a jazz saxophonist from 1955 to 1967. He was born in Hamlet, North Carolina on September 23, 1926. A few years later he moved to Highpoint, North Carolina.(D) As a child he was surrounded by a musical family. When he turned thirteen he started to play the alto saxophone. 1939 was a life changing year for Coltrane because his father, uncle, and grandparents died.(C) In the middle of that same year he graduated from grammar school.(D) Sadly when his family started to split and go

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    John Coltrane

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    John Coltrane: An Experimental Musician Jazz, which evolved from African American folk music, has developed and changed over the last century to become an art form in America. It places particular importance on inventive self interpretation. Rather than relying on a written piece, the artist improvises. Jazz has taken many forms over the past seventy years; there is almost always a single person who can be credited with the evolution of that sound. From Thelonius Monk, and his bebop, to Dizzy Gillespie’s

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    John Coltrane

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    search for the incorporation of his spirituality with his music. John Coltrane was not only an essential contributor to jazz, but also music itself. John Coltrane died thirty-two years ago, on July 17, 1967, at the age of forty. In the years since, his influence has only grown, and the stellar avant-garde saxophonist has become a jazz legend of a stature shared only by Louis Armstrong and Charlie Parker. As an instrumentalist Coltrane was technically and imaginatively equal to both; as a composer he

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    Spirituality and John Coltrane

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    and John Coltrane After being fired from Miles Davis's band in 1957 for his chronic use of heroin, John Coltrane was hurt tremendously. He decided it was time he quit using heroin. He took a month off from music while he went "cold turkey." During this month in the early spring of 1957, Coltrane had a momentous religious experience (Nisenson, 40). Coltrane asked God to give him "the means and privilege to make others happy through music" (Coltrane, 1995, 2). As time went on, Coltrane felt

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    The Life And Music Of John Coltrane

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    A Brief Look Into The Life and Music of JOHN COLTRANE John Coltrane was born in born in Hamlet, North Carolina on September 23, 1926. John Coltrane was an only child. His father, John was a tailor who played the violin and ukulele, and his mother Alice played piano and sang in the church choir. This was a great environment to foster his love of music. Coltrane soon moved with his family to the town of High Point, where his grandfather was the pastor of the A.M.E. Zion Church. His family was

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    John Coltrane: A Visionary of Modal Jazz

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    The legendary saxophonist John Coltrane made a lasting impression in North American jazz music by pioneering a new subgenre known as “modal jazz.” By examining Coltrane’s personal life, professional career, evolving style of music, and his legacy that endures to this day, one can better understand the importance of this individual’s contribution to American culture and reflect upon his creative genius. On September 23, 1926, John Coltrane was born in Hamlet, North Carolina, to a family of ministers

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    John Coltrane Influence

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    biggest impacts can help people everywhere feel more connected to the upcoming of many important musical genres. As many genres have shaped everyday lives of humans, one genre in particular created an amazing musical revolution, jazz. A contributor, John Coltrane, influenced a major innovation in the jazz genre and upbringing. It is thanks to him along with many others, that jazz has become one of the most influential genres that connects people from every culture. New Orleans, the birthplace of the jazz

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    Saxophone Essay

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    Saxophones. This led to its unpopular demise in the beginning of its musical journey, but Sidney Betchet believed in its potential as a primarily played saxophone and stood behind, the “underdog” of the saxophone family. In the 1950’s, a man named John Coltrane adopted the instrument, and from there it began to increase popularity and is still a beloved instrument in today’s modern music. The designer of the Soprano Saxophone would be Wayne Shorter, who is an astounding sopranoist. The Soprano Saxophone

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    Jazz

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    if it were not for the Jazz musicians of the 40s and 50s. These Jazz musicians serve as influences for all musicians to follow, in both their innovations in musical styles, but also in their lifestyles. We have men like Charlie “Bird” Parker, John Coltrane, and Thelonious Monk to thank for the music we enjoy today. Each of these men contributed in their own great way to music. While none of them are still wildly popular today or were in their own time, they undeniably helped usher in a new era of

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