Free Jewish Law Essays and Papers

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Free Jewish Law Essays and Papers

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    Hur (J): Well, in my Church, we were stuck on one particular topic: Jewish law. E: Quite an interesting topic to discuss. Do we have to observe the Jewish Law? Are we required to keep all of it, some of it, or none of it? Who would like to begin to try and answer this interesting question? S: I would like to begin. In my ekkelisa, we are using the Gospel of Matthew

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    The rapid development of technology over the past few centuries has certainly left an impact on the world of halacha¸ or Jewish Law. Poskim, the formulators of the halacha, have had to make decisions on a variety of topics to accommodate fast-paced advancements in areas ranging from travel (When does one crossing the International Date Line celebrate a holiday?) to home appliances (Under what circumstances may one use a refrigerator on the Sabbath?). One issue that has been particularly relevant

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    Dietary Laws of the Jewish Religion

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    In the Jewish religion dietary laws are one of the most important parts of keeping the faith. These laws are thought to be sent from God to keep the Jewish people pure. Over the year it has became easier for Jews to eat kosher but many people have chosen to assimilate with passing time. A tradition that started around 3500 years ago that has kept its importance. Around 1275 B.C.E many of the Jewish prophets started to talk about kashrut otherwise known as keeping kosher. They talked about how God

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    Capital Punishment

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    ------------ Should Christians support the death penalty? The answer to that question is controversial. Many Christians feel that the Bible has spoken to the issue, but others believe that the New Testament ethic of love replaces the Old Testament law. Old Testament Examples Throughout the Old Testament we find many cases in which God commands the use of capital punishment. We see this first with the acts of God Himself. God was involved, either directly or indirectly, in the taking of life as a

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    Russian Jews

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    said that even the poorest Jews could find someone poorer to help and give money to. According to the Jewish religion, tzedakah is one of the most important mitzvahs you can do. The same could be said about the Jewish holidays. They were observed very strictly, but Shabbat was the most welcomed. In order to teach the importance of Jewish law, they started their own schools, their own courts of law, and their own burial societies. even though there were pogroms, religious persecution forced the Jews

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    Forgiveness and Sin

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    the Bible is simple to find, as it is on nearly every single page of it. It is that of man's sin and God's attempt to forgive him of that sin while still being absolutely holy and absolutely just. First, God gives man His Law. These are the same rules and regulations that many Jewish Orthodox follow to this very day. Next, in the supreme act of love, God sends His Son, Jesus Christ, to die for man's sins in a final act of forgiveness. Both of these acts are seen through the life of a single person,

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    first (ie. have a circumcision, and follow the Jewish Laws). Paul, being the one that defended the gentile's right to be Christians, became the apostle to the gentiles. Why would Paul, a Jew, want to be an apostle to gentiles? According to him, Jesus appeared to him in AD 32 or 36, and told him to preach the good news to the gentiles (Gal 1:16). Paul uses scripture to explain why gentiles should not be required to be circumcised, or obey Jewish Law; however, there are no direct quotes in scripture

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    Judaism

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    knowing and is in all places at all times. He is also compassionate and just. The Jewish religion is passed on via the mother of a child. If the mother is Jewish, the child is 100% Jewish. According to Jewish law, one will remain a Jew even if they don’t practice Judaism or they do not believe in God. The Israelites accepted the Ten Commandments from God at Mount Sinai therefore they devoted themselves to following a code of law which regulates both how they worship and how they should treat other people

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    Jewish Law is considered to be Divine Law due to its direct influence from God. God handed over a set of laws to the Jews and left it to adapt and flourish with them. They followed these rules, but in time they became obsolete which forced them to intervene and change the laws to better suit their society. Rabbinic judaism evolved as the philosopher king of interpreting the Hebrew Bible. These interpretations formed the Talmud. Although the interpretations were much like opinions on what the Bible

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    A Jewish Reading of Milton

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    A Jewish Reading of Milton John Milton produced some of the most memorable Christian texts in English literature. Central pieces of Milton’s work, including Paradise Lost and Samson Agonistes, specifically allude to stories that Judaism and Christianity hold in common. Historically, the anti-monarchical regime Milton supported, under the leadership of Cromwell, informally allowed Jews back into England in 1655 after Edward I exiled them in 1290 (Trepp 151). Additionally, seventeenth-century

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