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    figures, which provide mediation under tensional circumstances. As Twelfth Night is an atypical romantic comedy, the jester is not the only fool who is subject to foolery, many other characters are subject to foolery by their silly acts as well. There are two types of fool in the play, namely Feste the professional jester who is in fact quite intelligent, and the non-jester fools, who are not fools but act like fools. Since Feste is the only designed fool in the play, the role of Feste will

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    part in the play to “play” in. Yet, they all seem to meet up with each other in one way or another. One of the reasons for this is Puck, in which he led them “Up and down, up and down” (3.2.418) the ladder of society to meet each other. He, a court jester, has the power to manipulate more important characters to make mischief, with Puck laughing in the background at every mishap. He loves chaos and doesn’t care about the consequences of this actions as long as he gets a good laugh out of it. He led

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    In Twelfth Night, Shakespeare portrays several characters in a controversial way. Some witty characters are portrayed as foolish, and some foolish characters are portrayed as witty. In the beginning of the play, Sir Andrew and Malvolio are presented as smart people; however, as the play progresses, the audience is exposed to their foolish sides. On the other hand, Sir Toby and Feste are portrayed as fools, but as the plot develops the audience acknowledges their wisdom. Malvolio and Sir Andrew’s

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    William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: Feste

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    afar, waiting and observing, high up among the towering cliffs. He only chuckles and hums a tune, as he silently watches Viola mourn. He holds no facial expression, neither teary nor auspicious and his physical appearance does not represent a common Jester in Elizabethan times. In view of Feste’s silent observation of Viola, one is able to speculate some sort of connection between the two characters. Given that he is a compassionate man, he is not taken aback by what the world has evolved to nor does

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    subtle ways, as through songs, ridicule and use of wordplay, Feste fulfills his purpose without a chance of punishment or feelings of resentment hence the title “Twelfth Night.” Therefore, Shakespeare's decision to make a character such as a court jester the narrator was the perfect fit as Feste's choice of words themselves.

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    Feste and Malvolio in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night In Shakespeare's play, Twelfth Night, there are many very different characters. Feste and Malvolio are two good examples of characters, very different from each other. One is someone who acts like a puritan and scolds others when they do not act in the same way, whereas the other is someone who gets scolded for being clever with his words and for enjoying singing. This does not mean I would like the play more if one of the two characters

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    Importance of the Fool in King Lear Beginning in the late 17th century, producers of King Lear removed the Fool from productions of King Lear. He did not return until 1838. Producers greatly diminished both King Lear and Lear as a result. One should notice the importance of the Fool very early in the play. In Scene 4, Lear asks for his Fool twice. The second time is just a few lines after the first. He seems to need his Fool urgently. Yet the Fool has been pining over the loss of Cordelia

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    The Porter’s Speech

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    The Porter’s Speech At the beginning of act two, scene three, we are introduced to a drunken Porter, who gives a speech to the audience. Shakespeare used the convention of the Fool or Court Jester to great effect, especially in his Tragedies where the Fools are less identifiable and can have major parts. Like more modern versions, the continuity person on TV, the Fool offers relief from unbearable tension and keeps us busy and amused during scene changes. Unlike the modern circus

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    Essay On The Fools

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    The fool or folly is mostly associated with the theatrical profession due to William Shakespeare’s common use of the fool or jester characters in his plays. But what most people don’t know is that the fool has been present in western society well before Shakespeare was known as a playwright. The fool first appeared in literature during the 15th to the 17th century, representing the vices, grotesqueries and weaknesses of contemporary society at that time. According to encyclopaedia Britannica (2014)

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    The Noble Jester

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    As life proceeds its slow waltz, and humans live their lives, meeting countless other people in the same predicament of nearing an unavoidable end. In this cycle of monotony and conversation there can be people found that are different. Those who are never bothered by the burdens of death and monotony, and hurry through life to greet death as a lost friend they had encountered many times on their sprees of invincibility. From the handful of people who resemble these characteristics, one can be found

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